Work relationship key to motivation

first_img The next most important factors are interesting work (57 per cent) followed by level of pay (45 per cent) and job security (40 per cent). A further 36 per cent cited opportunities for training.The quality of supervision or management (19 per cent), physical working environment (19 per cent), and opportunities for promotion (15 per cent) were considered less important.• 020-7529 5930 www.cbi.org.uk Previous Article Next Article Related posts:No related photos. Comments are closed. Work relationship key to motivationOn 4 Jul 2000 in Personnel Todaylast_img read more

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Former New Zealand Navy ship delivered to new owner

first_img Photo: RNZN file photo of HMNZS Manawanui Share this article More than 75 years after the Second World War, decommissioned Royal New Zealand Navy (RNZN) diving support vessel Manawanui will soon be fighting environmental hazards at key sites across the southern Pacific.Decommissioned from the RNZN in February 2018 after 30 years of service, former HMNZS Manawanui has been handed over to her new owners at HMNZS Philomel, the Devonport Naval Base, the navy said.The ship was bought by the parent company of Major Projects Group, an Australian company that intends to use her for research, education and the prevention of potential oil spill damage.The foundation will use the ship to do research into slowing the corrosion of shipwrecks to determine out how much bunker oil remains. Its mission is to preserve maritime heritage, protect dive sites that generate national income and circumvent potentially catastrophic oil spills.Key to the foundation’s work will be ships sunk in Second World War battles across the Pacific. Some of them are leaking oil, 75 years after the war that raged across the Pacific.Renamed MV Recovery, she will be sailed to Australia in mid-July by Australian volunteers for a refit. She will then spend several months on shakedown research missions off the Australian east coast before heading into the Pacific to work on maritime and environmental conservation efforts, according to the navy.Commissioned into the navy in 1988, Manawanui was originally built in 1979 as a diving support vessel, the Star Perseus, for North Sea oil rig operations.She was the third ship of this name to serve in the RNZN. View post tag: Royal New Zealand Navy View post tag: MANAWANUIlast_img read more

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Psychiatrist Specializing in Geriatric Medicine

first_imgRowan University School of Osteopathic Medicine (RowanSOM) iscurrently seeking a talented Psychiatrist to join our dynamicDepartment of Geriatrics and Gerontology within the New JerseyInstitute for Successful Aging (NJISA) located in Southern NewJersey.This position is for a full-time academic faculty adultpsychiatrist with a focus on Consultation Liaison Psychiatry. Thesuccessful candidate will have experience in adult inpatient andoutpatient care. Responsibilities include teaching medical studentsand residents and leading an interdisciplinary team.NJISA is a patient centered behavioral health departmentspecializing in Geriatric Psychiatry with a warm and collegialatmosphere. This is a great academic opportunity as well as a greatmix of work/life balance.Applicants must have an MD or DO degree, be able to obtain orcurrently have a valid NJ Medical license, CDS and DEA and beAOBNP/ABPN Board Certified/Board Eligible.Salary is competitive and is accompanied by a generouscomprehensive State of New Jersey benefits package.Our clinical campus is located in Southern New Jersey, which iswithin the Philadelphia metropolitan area approximately eight milesfrom Center City Philadelphia, one hour from the Jersey Shore, andhour and a half from NYC and two hours from Washington, DC.Rowan University values diversity and is committed to equalopportunity in employment.Advertised: Oct 11 2019 Eastern Daylight TimeApplications close:last_img read more

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Wilton Select Board discusses next step for Forster Mill

first_imgWILTON – Members of the select board met virtually Tuesday evening to discuss updates with the former Forster Mill site; Town Manager Rhonda Irish and select persons Keith Swett and Tom Saviello recently met with Ransom Consulting to discuss the next steps for the former Forster Mill site. The consulting firm has been used consistently throughout the process of appropriately demolishing the abandoned mill.Though the majority of the building has been taken down, several piers remain as well as a concrete slab. Originally, the town had been looking at the option of having the piers removed but have opted to hold off and have requested that Ransom conduct a “geo-technical” survey of the site. The purpose of the investigation would be to determine how much weight could be put on the concrete slab, such as storage units or construction vehicles. The results would help determine the scope of project that could be completed at the site by future owners.Irish reported that all of the grant and loan funds from the Androscoggin Valley Council Of Governments have been used, but funding from the Maine Department of Economic and Community Development and Department of Environmental Protection still has a grant balance of $5,398.35 and an available loan amount of $100,000.Ransom estimated the project to cost roughly $26,000.The town currently owes $50,000 on the DEP loan for the project, and $75,000 on the AVCOG loan which they will pay off over the next two years.Saviello moved to use the remaining $5,000 grant money and cover the rest of the $21,000 with a loan.“This seems like an investment in order to get the most out of the property and get it back on the tax roles,” Select person Tiffany Mauiri said.The motion was passed unanimously.last_img read more

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Students write, perform new Fighting Irish hype song

first_imgClaire Kopischke | The Observer Jim Small didn’t expect much to come of his conversation with Jay Rivera-Herrans last November. Rivera-Herrans, a senior and film, television and theater student, was looking to write a song. Small, the University’s associate vice president for storytelling and engagement, suggested that he write it about the history of the term “the Fighting Irish.”“We had this conversation last November and six months later he stops in my office and plays a demo of the song — it was a great surprise,” Small said. Now, that song, “The Fighting Irish (Of Notre Dame, Y’all)” is for sale on CD and available for streaming on Amazon and Spotify. Rivera-Herrans created the song, which is part rap and part ballad, with his classmate, Teagan Earley, a Notre Dame senior and vocalist.Rivera-Herrans and Earley publicly performed the song for the first time on Friday afternoon at the Eck Visitors Center, followed by a CD signing at the Hammes Bookstore. At the Notre Dame Pep Rally on South Quad that evening, they again performed the song, which featured lyrics telling the story of how Notre Dame overcame anti-Irish discrimination.For many years, Irish immigrants endured discrimination in the United States by facing stereotypes and hostility.“Many companies openly advertised ‘Irish Need Not Apply’ — that’s how difficult it was,” Small said. “For many years in our country, the term ‘Fighting Irish’ was a derogatory slur to define Irish people as violent, drunk and prone to poverty and crime.”Small said he has a personal connection to that story.“As an Irish Catholic, my grandparents educated all of us as to the struggles the Irish had when they first immigrated to America in the mid-1800’s,” he said. “The only jobs they could get, if any at all, were the most dangerous or lowest paying.”In 1909, a sportswriter at the “Detroit Free Press” used the slur “Fighting Irish” directed at Notre Dame, mocking the school for its association with Irish immigrants.The University, however, soon embraced the term. In 1927, University President Matthew Walsh issued a statement proclaiming that University officials welcomed the spirit “embodied in the term ‘Fighting Irish.’”Rivera-Herrans said he was inspired by how “we ended up embracing [the term] as this badge of honor to unify us.” With that spirit in mind, he and Earley began putting that history into song, he said.After Rivera-Herrans and Earley decided to take on the project, the actual writing process took months. Rivera-Herrans said he and Earley went through many drafts before arriving at the final product.“At one point, I had written an entire song and we just scrapped the entire thing,” Rivera-Herrans said. “Like started from scratch, a totally different vibe and everything. But it was a lot of fun.”The song isn’t Rivera-Herrans’ first major project. He wrote and starred in the musical “Stupid Humans,” which premiered February at the DeBartolo Performing Arts Center. This year, Rivera-Herrans said he’s in “development mode,” working on a wide array of projects.Although Rivera-Herrans said he’s excited about the new song, he doesn’t want it to replace Cathy Richardson’s “Here Come the Irish,” the popular Notre Dame hype song that plays before football games.“That’s not it at all — I’d never try to do that,” Rivera-Herrans said. “If it just becomes another little piece of the Notre Dame story, then that’s more than enough for me.”He and Small encouraged Fighting Irish fans to download and stream the song.“I hope our students, alumni, parents and fans will like it enough to download the song and add it to their Notre Dame playlist — for many years to come,” Small said. “I can tell you I used to have 10 songs on my Notre Dame playlist. Now I have 11.”last_img read more

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Is talking holding you back?

first_img ShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblr continue reading » It’s easy to talk. But you have a problem when your words don’t have a purpose or don’t lead to action. There are reasons teams might defer to talk instead of action: Ideas are just ideas, whereas action puts your intelligence and capabilities in the spotlight. No one wants to seem incompetent, so sticking to talking can seem safe.But doing so eliminates a sense of responsibility. Leadership guru Dan Rockwell recently wrote a blog to help teams overcome too much talking to achieve more. Here are some benefits of action worth considering:Openness to listen and learn. People who are constantly talking – sharing their opinions but not getting input from others – seem self-centered. We each have limitations on our knowledge; it’s important to acknowledge the value that others bring to your team.Momentum. You can’t reach your end goal if you don’t take that first step to get there.last_img read more

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West Sulawesi turtle conservation island allegedly sold for Rp 2 billion

first_imgThe police have also requested information from the two residents who allegedly sold the island. They have said that the transaction was with North Penajam Paser Regent Abdul Gafur Masud.“We have the down payment receipt of Rp 200 million, the nominal value of Rp 2 billion, and the transaction was carried out in Balikpapan,” Syamsuriansyah said, adding that it remained unclear whether the transaction was for the whole island or part of it.Regent Gafur dismissed the issue. He acknowledged that he had visited the island recently but said his visit was to monitor its condition in his capacity as the chairman of the Indonesian Archipelago and Coastal Government Association (Aspeksindo).“I don’t know much about the issue, but I was indeed recently in West Sulawesi. I used my own [boat] to go to the islands of Sabakatang, Salisingan, Kepongonan and then Malamber, where I went diving as well,” he said.The regent noted that East Kalimantan and West Sulawesi had had a history of territorial disputes. “Maybe the officials in West Sulawesi are worried because I am the regent of East Kalimantan,” said Gafur.Muhammad Ridwan Alimuddin, a maritime researcher at Hasanuddin University in Makassar, South Sulawesi, said that Malamber Island had been home to 12 families, but some had moved out because of a dispute, leaving only four families.Ridwan, who had recently researched the island cluster, said that Malamber was a promising investment site and had the potential to be developed into a tourist area because the island was close to the country’s future capital. “But the island has been designated a turtle conservation center by the governor,” he said.National Police spokesperson Sr. Comr. Argo Yuwono was not available to comment when contacted by The Jakarta Post on Monday. (syk)Topics : Two residents of Malamber Island, West Sulawesi, have allegedly sold the island to an East Kalimantan regent for Rp 2 billion (US$140,800).Malamber Island is a sparsely populated turtle conservation center and is part of the Balabalakang island cluster in Mamuju regency, West Sulawesi.Balabalakang district head Juara said the East Kalimantan regent had given down payment of Rp 200 million to a person named Rajab, one of the two residents who reportedly sold the island. “I just learned the information from the [Mamuju] regent. I was surprised because they had not notified district officials of the sale,” Juara told kompas.com recently, adding that Mamuju Regent Habsi Wahid had reprimanded him for the oversight.Mamuju Police criminal investigation unit head Adj. Comr. Syamsuriansyah said he had requested information from local officials and the National Land Agency (BPN) office in Mamuju to clarify the rights to and ownership of Malamber Island. However, Syamsuriansyah said, local officials and the BPN had not been able to provide a statement on the first call. They had promised to visit the Mamuju Police headquarters at a later time to provide the information.“If, later, we find a criminal element, we will decide whether the case meets the requirements to be upgraded to a higher level [of investigation],” he said.last_img read more

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Joseph Mariathasan: Nuclear safety, bad science, and climate change

first_imgSource: International Atomic Energy AgencyAn inspector visits the Fukushima Daiichi power plant in 2013The LNT model and ALARA force levels of safety that may appear to be worthwhile, but come at the expense of increased risks elsewhere. The evacuation of the area surrounding the Fukushima nuclear power plant in the immediate aftermath of the earthquake and tsunami in 2011 reportedly killed more people in the prefecture than the natural disasters themselves, according to a Japanese newpaper cited by NBC. However, there appeared to be no evidence that anyone died from exposure to radioactivity.More worryingly, the underlying philosophy in terms of the LNT model could be based on what Calabrese and others claim is fraudulent science.As Calabrese states: “The story of cancer risk assessment as told by regulatory agencies such as the EPA is really a profound example of flawed science – the product of errors, deception, perverse incentives from academic grants, and ideology.”However, the fear of radioactivity is so deeply ingrained in the popular psyche that any attempt to question the assumptions creates controversy itself – as demonstrated in this article by American news website Mother Jones and the Center for Public Integrity. Scientific issues are obscured by political stances that degrade attempts to develop a rational discourse on understanding what actual risks are being faced.It may seem reasonable to say that, until the health risks are fully understood, we should continue to employ the most conservative approach to dealing with exposures to radiation. However, the medical evidence already seems strong – see, for example, this Feburary 2018 paper from physics and health experts, published in the Journal of Nuclear Medicine.Meanwhile, if humanity faces an existential challenge through global warming, there has to be objective assessments based on actual science rather than reinforcing prejudices. This suggests advocates of environmental and sustainable investing approaches would be wise to not reject nuclear power out of hand. Source: Cato Institute“The story of cancer risk assessment as told by regulatory agencies is really a profound example of flawed science – the product of errors, deception, perverse incentives from academic grants, and ideology”Edward Calabrese, University of MassachussettsCurrent approaches to nuclear safety are based on the LNT model, which in turn leads to the objective of ensuring radiation is “As Low as Reasonably Achievable” – abbreviated to ALARA. The adoption of LNT and ALARA as the guiding principles of safety means radiation levels are set within a small fraction of naturally occurring levels.According to Wade Allison, emeritus professor of physics at Oxford University, this measurement is unrelated to any risk. Instead, he argues, it comes from a political wish to say that the effects of radiation have been minimised.Opponents of the LNT model argue that radiation can be a potential source of cancer – although it is actually very small, and it does this by damaging DNA at any given dose of radiation or a given dose over a given time. However, from human and animal studies, we know a given dose of radiation (or a given dose over a given time) below certain levels allows living creatures to repair DNA damage – not just from radiation, but from much greater DNA damage due to a creature’s own metabolism.Some scientists subscribe to the theory that such radiation damage and its repair by the body can actually stimulate decreased DNA damage throughout the body – known as radiation hormesis. More significantly, there are thresholds of radiation dose and dose over a given time, below which no increased cancer incidence can be observed. Allison often argues that life evolved in the presence of radiation and is adapted to its presence in the form of background radiation. What is the impact of low dose radiation on living creatures? This may seem an esoteric question only of interest to medical clinicians and animal rights activists, but the answer has enormous ramifications on the economics of nuclear power – and hence on the ability to successfully reduce the impact of climate change.  Life on Earth arose and evolved in the presence of background radiation. Clearly, all life must be able to tolerate radiation levels below some minimum threshold, or else life would never have evolved. However, public acceptance and the economics of nuclear power are affected by current safety regulations, which in turn are based on what many scientists believe is flawed – and potentially fraudulent – science.In a recent article for the Cato Institute’s Regulation journal, Edward Calabrese, a professor of environmental health sciences at the University of Massachusetts, looks at the origin of the Linear-No-Threshold (LNT) model – the fundamental plank of radiation safety.The LNT model essentially states that a low dosage will cause commensurately less, but still some, damage. It also leads to the conclusion that if millions of people are exposed to radiation, no matter what the level, there is an expectation that there will be a certain number of deaths arising directly from the radiation exposure and the number will be a function of the dose.center_img Calabrese argues that the LNT model is based on the judgment and passion of Hermann Muller. Muller, an American scientist and Nobel Prize winner, was the first to claim that x-rays induced gene mutations. Muller made a momentous breakthrough in 1926 when he found a way to produce alterations in the size, colour, or shape of fruit flies, which he interpreted as being the result of gene mutation.In 1930, he announced that the nature of the dose response for x-ray-induced mutation was linear, all the way down to the smallest dose. That meant, he claimed, there was no safe exposure to radiation.last_img read more

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Rothesay Life to raise £500m in preparation for DB insurance deals

first_imgRothesay has only publicised one of its deals completed since the start of July: a £520m buy-in with the Cadbury Mondelēz Pension Fund.Rothesay Life CEO Addy Loudiadis said: “Rothesay Life has a strong history of being disciplined but agile in both investment markets and in new business origination. Balance sheet strength and considerable shareholder support allow us to execute on our conviction that there is an exceptional opportunity to write business in the defined benefit de-risking market this year.“While the political and economic backdrop clearly presents challenges, we believe there will also be opportunities for strong institutions which are risk managed well. We expect this to be a record year for new business for Rothesay Life and to finish 2019 as the third largest annuity provider in the UK.”As of 30 June 2019, the group had £37.7bn of assets under management through insuring DB schemes, making it the fifth largest pension provider in the UK by assets, according to IPE’s Top 1000 Pension Funds survey. L&G insures law firm’s DB fund US law firm Edwards Wildman Palmer was a fiduciary management client of L&GLegal & General (L&G) has agreed a £35m buyout for the UK DB scheme of US law firm Edwards Wildman Palmer.The scheme was a client of L&G’s fiduciary management business, part of Legal & General Investment Management (LGIM), which allowed the scheme to invest in “buyout aware” funds offered by LGIM.Philip Bush, chairman of the scheme’s trustee board, said: “We have worked closely with the fiduciary management and buyout teams at Legal & General to develop our asset strategy to target buyout and their support allowed us to achieve our objective in a timely, efficient manner. We look forward to continuing to work with Legal & General as they take on responsibility for paying our members’ benefits.”Julian Hobday, director of pension risk transfer at L&G added: “This transaction is an example of our teams working seamlessly together to ensure that our customers can easily benefit from the full range of services we offer.“Combining our buyout and fiduciary management propositions enabled us to leverage the breadth of Legal & General’s capabilities to achieve the trustees’ objectives and smoothly transition to buyout.” Specialist defined benefit (DB) pension insurer Rothesay Life plans to raise £500m (€561m) from its shareholders to fund a bumper period for new transactions, it announced yesterday.The insurance group said it expected to write more than £10bn of new business during 2019, having “several significant bulk annuity transactions” in the pipeline. It completed £3.7bn of bulk annuity business since the start of July, bringing its total new business volume for 2019 so far to £4.4bn.If it hits this target, it would mark a record year for new business for Rothesay Life. “Balance sheet strength combined with substantial new equity capital being contributed by our shareholders will help Rothesay Life to take advantage of unprecedented opportunity in the defined benefit buy-in and buyout market,” the company said. “Rothesay Life’s shareholders will contribute at least £500m in new equity to support this.”last_img read more

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