2-year-old shot dead in Philadelphia day after 11-month-old survives being shot 4 times

first_imgWPVI(PHILADELPHIA) — A 2-year-old girl is dead after being shot in the back of the head when someone opened fire on a house in North Philadelphia on Sunday. The shooting came less than 24 hours after an 11-month-old survived when shot four times in the city. The child was pronounced dead at the scene, according to police.The shooting took place at about 3:30 p.m. Sunday. The mother of the child, 24, was also struck by gunfire in the head and back and is in stable condition. A 33-year-old man is in critical condition after being struck in the stomach, police said.Authorities said the house seemed to be targeted in the shooting, with someone shooting from outside the home.Police are looking for surveillance video from the area to help in the investigation. No one has been arrested and no description of a suspect has been released.The 11-month-old was struck at about 8 p.m. Saturday while in the back of a vehicle being driven by the child’s stepmother, police said. The child was struck in the head, chest and back in the shooting and taken to Einstein Medical Center in critical condition.No arrests have been made in that shooting either.Phildelphia’s Fraternal Order of Police is offering $5,000 for information leading to an arrest. Philadelphia Mayor Jim Kenney said he was “disgusted” by the violence Sunday afternoon.“Outraged, disgusted, and heartbroken by the violence this weekend that claimed the life of an innocent 2-year-old and left another infant fighting for his life,” he said in a series of tweets. “My prayers are with their families and communities during this tragic time.”“Philadelphians should not live in fear of violence that could take away a child’s life,” he continued. “But for too many, this is a sad reality. With the unabated flow of illegal guns and drugs, we must do whatever we can locally to address violence and help residents.”He added, “We’ll have teams in the neighborhoods impacted by this weekend’s violence to provide support and trauma-informed care. The @PhillyPolice department is conducting a full investigation and will have whatever resources they need to bring these perpetrators to justice.” Copyright © 2019, ABC Audio. All rights reserved.last_img read more

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Assessment of soil moisture fields from imperfect climate models with uncertain satellite observations

first_imgWe demonstrate that global satellite products can be used to evaluate climate model soil moisture predictions but conclusions should be drawn with care. The quality of a limited area climate model (LAM) was compared to a general circulation model (GCM) using soil moisture data from two different Earth observing satellites within a model validation scheme that copes with the presence of uncertain data. Results showed that in the face of imperfect models and data, it is difficult to investigate the quality of current land surface schemes in simulating hydrology accurately. Nevertheless, a LAM provides, in general, a better representation of spatial patterns and dynamics of soil moisture compared to a GCM. However, in months when data uncertainty is higher, particularly in colder months and in periods when vegetation cover is too dense (e. g. August in the case of Western Europe), it is not possible to draw firm conclusions about model acceptability. For periods of higher confidence in observation data, our work indicates that a higher resolution LAM has more benefits to soil moisture prediction than are due to the resolution alone and can be attributed to an overall enhanced representation of precipitation relative to the GCM. Consequently, heterogeneity of rainfall patterns is better represented in the LAM and thus adequate representation of wet and dry periods leads to an improved acceptability of soil moisture (with respect to uncertain satellite observations), particularly in spring and early summer. Our results suggest that remote sensing, albeit with its inherent uncertainties, can be used to highlight which model should be preferred and as a diagnostic tool to pinpoint regions where the hydrological budget needs particular attention.last_img read more

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Biotic interactions as a structuring force in soil communities: evidence from the micro-arthropods of an Antarctic moss model system

first_imgCurrent meta-community theories postulate that the structure of local communities depends on dispersal, environmental filtering, and biotic interactions. However, disentangling the relative effects of these factors in the field and for diverse assemblages is a major challenge. A solution is to address natural but simple communities (i.e. with low numbers of species in few trophic levels), wherein one of these factors is predominant. Here, we analyse the micro-arthropod community of a moss-turf habitat typical of the Antarctic Peninsula region, and test the widely accepted hypothesis that this system is abiotically driven. In the austral summers 2006/7 and 2007/8, we sampled nearly 80 units of moss from four islands in the Argentine Islands. Using variance partitioning, we quantified the relative contribution of: (1) multiple scale spatio-temporal autocorrelation; (2) environmental effects; (3) the island effect. Little variance (1 %) was accounted for by sources 1 (1 %, significant) and 2 (<1 %, not significant). The island effect significantly accounted for the largest amount of variation (8 %). There was a relatively large effect of spatially structured environmental variation (7 %). Null models demonstrated that species co-occurred less frequently than expected by chance, suggesting the prevalence of negative interactions. Our data support the novel hypothesis that negative biotic interactions are the most important structuring force of this micro-arthropod community. The analysed system is a good proxy for more complex communities in terms of taxonomic composition and the functional groups present. Thus, biotic interaction might be a predominant factor in soil meta-community dynamics.last_img read more

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I know my rights! Increase in awareness of redress drives significant increase in complaints

first_imgHome » News » I know my rights! Increase in awareness of redress drives significant increase in complaints previous nextRegulation & LawI know my rights! Increase in awareness of redress drives significant increase in complaintsThe annual report from the Property Redress Scheme reveals a significantly increased workload created in part by more people knowing about their right to compensation.Nigel Lewis23rd May 20190696 Views More and more consumers are now aware of their right to compensation when things go wrong in the property market which has helped double the number of cases handled by the UK’s leading redress scheme last year.The Property Redress Scheme (PRS) says it issued 77 final decisions during 2018, up 103% from 38 the year before, and awarded £300,000 to complainants.The most common grievances against sales agents were about misleading or incorrect information and bad communications, while for letting agents it was breach of duty of care and poor service and complaint handling.“Our scheme continued to grow steadily in the first three quarters of 2018 and this reflected a still expanding market, better enforcement of the regulations and much higher awareness of the legislation,” says Sean Hooker, Head of Redress at the PRS (left).“2018 was a fundamental year for the Property Redress Scheme, and this was mirrored in the wider sector, as further developments in the Government’s “project” to reform the housing market started to take shape”.The PRS is the largest redress scheme in the UK with close to 11,000 estate agency branches signed up, helped by the closure of rival Ombudsman Services: Property in August last year.PRS has released its annual report, which reveals that out of all the agents it expelled from the scheme last year, 48% came from London and 14% from the North West.Its average award was £1,102 but last year it also made an award of £25,000 in favour of one landlord whose agent had failed to pass on rent and behaved unprofessionally.Read more about redress schemes.Sean Hooker Property Redress Scheme PRS May 23, 2019Nigel LewisWhat’s your opinion? Cancel replyYou must be logged in to post a comment.Please note: This is a site for professional discussion. Comments will carry your full name and company.This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.Related articles BREAKING: Evictions paperwork must now include ‘breathing space’ scheme details30th April 2021 City dwellers most satisfied with where they live30th April 2021 Hong Kong remains most expensive city to rent with London in 4th place30th April 2021last_img read more

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Vanderburgh County Courts to Implement Electronic Filing as Part of Statewide Project

first_img FacebookTwitterCopy LinkEmailShare at: http://www.in.gov/judiciary/4287.htm. Evansville, Ind.—Clerk of the Courts Carla Hayden confirmed today that Vanderburgh Circuit and Superior Courts will begin accepting electronic filing of court documents (commonly known as e-filing) on Monday, February 20th. Hayden stated, “Ironically, we will begin e-filing on Presidents Day, a day when our office is actually closed. That is part of the beauty of e-filing. The office is never really closed. Users will be able to file documents 24/7.” “On February 20th, e-filing becomes an option in Vanderburgh County, but it will not be mandatory. Paper filings will still be accepted. On April 21st, e-filing will become mandatory for attorneys for subsequent filings in cases that have already been opened with the Court. When e-filing becomes mandatory in initial filings, it will only be required for attorneys and only in case types available for initial filings,” Hayden said. The date for mandatory e-filing of initial filings has not yet been determined.The Evansville Bar Association has scheduled several seminars to educate local attorneys and their staffs on the e-filing process. “Interest in e-filing has been high and the response has been positive. It is my understanding that they scheduled three sessions and have filled them all. But, if you can attach a PDF to an email, you can e-file,” Hayden said. To aid non- lawyers who frequently file cases pro se, such as government offices, property managers, etc., Hayden has arranged for the Trial Court Technology Division of the Office of Judicial Administration to hold a training session on Friday, February 10th at 9:00 a.m. in Room 301 of the Civic Center. The session is free and no registration is required, but space is limited.In 2014, the Indiana Supreme Court announced the implementation of statewide e-filing, which reduces paper copies, postage, and trips to the clerk’s office. E-filing began in Hamilton County on July 29, 2015, with plans for statewide implementation by the end of 2018. More information about e-filing, including the rules and implementation schedule, list of service providers, and details about training sessions, can be found at courts.in.gov/efile. The E-filing Rules and Implementation Schedule are also availablelast_img read more

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99 Percent of O.C. Teachers Pass New Evaluations

first_imgOcean City High SchoolThe state Department of Education released its new teacher evaluations on Wednesday with plenty of warnings to take the results of a developing new program with a grain of salt.Starting in the 2013-14 school year, teachers and school leaders across the state were evaluated based on “multiple measures including observations, student growth goals set by educators and supervisors, and, for some, student growth on state assessments (test results).”The first set of results were made public on Wednesday for more than 113,000 teachers statewide.“As expected, the majority of New Jersey educators earned the top two of four possible ratings, Effective or Highly Effective, but districts now know much more about the outcomes of their work with students,” the state Department of Education said in a news release. “In addition, approximately 2,900 teachers were identified as Ineffective or Partially Effective – and these teachers provided instruction to more than 180,000 New Jersey children last year.”In prior years, teachers typically received a rating of “acceptable” or “not acceptable,” often based on a single annual classroom visit by a supervisor.The aim of the new evaluation program is to provide individualized feedback to teachers and to help districts tailor support for those who need it most.Of 187 teachers evaluated in the Ocean City School District in 2013-14, 185 (or 98.9 percent) were rated “effective” or “highly effective,” leaving just two teachers rated “ineffective” or “partially effective.”The ratings were broken down by school as follows:Ocean City High School: 103 teachers were evaluated, and since all fell in the same performance level (presumably “effective”), the breakdown is reported only with asterisks.Ocean City Intermediate School: 49 teachers were evaluated, and 46 were rated “effective.”Ocean City Primary School: 35 teachers were evaluated with 23 rated “effective,” 10 “highly effective” and presumably two rated “ineffective” or “partially effective.”In an effort to prevent the public from trying to identify scores of individual educators, the state reported only with asterisks:Records that have n-size < 10 are suppressed, e.g., if 9 or fewer staff received a rating of Ineffective, the record will be suppressed (the record will not be part of the data file). The total will always be displayed irrespective of n-size.When one performance level is suppressed due to n-size, and all 4 performance level ratings are present, the next lowest staff count will be suppressed (record will not be part of the file), to disallow roll-up to find the rating count for the first level suppressed and thus potentially identify educators.Records with 100% staff in one performance level are suppressed, as per state law (since in this case, any viewer would know each educator’s evaluation rating). In such cases, only the total staff count record will be provided as part of the data file.“The real story of the first year of AchieveNJ,” said Peter Shulman, Assistant Commissioner of Education and Chief Talent Officer, “is that educators have risen to the challenge of improving feedback for all teachers and leaders. While one year of this new data is insufficient for identifying sustained trends or making sweeping conclusions about the state’s teaching staff, we are proud of this significant improvement and the personalized support all educators are now receiving.”The full report is available online. To learn more about AchieveNJ, visit www.nj.gov/education/AchieveNJ.last_img read more

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Zoogma Announces Indefinite Hiatus

first_imgToday, the festival staple Zoogma announced that the group will be going on an indefinite break. With the Atlanta- and Nashville-based jam act entering its 10th year, the quartet composed of Brock Bowling, Matt Harris, Justin Hasting, and Ryan Nall will be splitting amicably, assuring fans in their Facebook announcement that “we still love each other and there are no internal struggles between any of us in the band.” The band also notes that the break will serve as a time for Zoogma’s individual members to “seek new opportunities as musicians, professionals, and adults.”Before going their separate ways in the future, Zoogma will finish out the handful of shows left on its calendar in addition to adding a “little ‘final run’ to send us off on a high note soon.” The band has called upon fans for suggestions on where to play, noting “you guys have been the backbone of this whole thing from the very beginning and we want to try and do what we can to rage with as many of you as possible one last time.” The announcement continued, “Thank you to everyone that has been supportive of us over the last decade, it has been truly remarkable what we have accomplished together.”Thus far, Zoogma has an upcoming three-night run in Florida scheduled, with performances in Gainsville on April 12th, Jacksonville on April 13th, and Tampa, on April 14th. The band will follow this Florida run with a performance at Atlanta’s Aisle 5 on April 19th, which will also serve as a late-night post-party for String Cheese Incident. In April and May, the group also has festival sets scheduled at Backwoods at Mulberry Mountain, One Vibration Music Festival, and Summer Camp Music Festival.You can read the full announcement below, and stay tuned for more tour dates from the group as they’re announced.last_img read more

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A tribute to Robert Levin: The practice of performance

first_img“A composer puts a mirror to the audience and asks us to recognize ourselves. It’s the same as with great plays. Music is no less serious just because it is composed of tones, not words.” — Robert LevinRobert Levin, the inaugural Dwight P. Robinson Jr. Professor of the Humanities at the Department of Music at Harvard, will retire from the University in 2014. As a tribute to his contribution to musical life at Harvard, the Music Department will honor him with a concert in Sanders Theatre on Sunday, January 26, at 3 p.m. Internationally renowned pianist Levin will perform pieces that he commissioned, premiered, or that have been commissioned for him. These include Bernard Rands’ 12 Preludes, John Harbison’s Piano Sonata No. 2, Hans Peter Türk’s Träume, and Straccio vecchio and Sauce 180 by Yehudi Wyner. Knowing Levin’s skill with improvisation, there may some surprises as well.If it weren’t for a tiny post office in a Black Forest German town, though, Levin may not have spent the past 20 years teaching performance at Harvard.“I was senior professor of piano at the Musikhochschule in Freiburg,” recounts Levin. “One morning I was heading towards the post office—it was very small, with just one window—and I saw a man with a stack of packages heading in the same direction. I thought, ‘I’ve got to get there first or I’ll be here all morning.’ As I got closer I recognized him. It was Christoph Wolff.”last_img read more

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Carrie Fisher of ‘Star Wars’ fame continues the battle

first_imgCarrie Fisher is best known as Princess Leia in the “Star Wars” saga, but the actress, author, and screenwriter is also a master of the one-liner, especially as a device to address her own battles with addiction and bipolar disorder.“I’ve never been ashamed of my mental illness; it never occurred to me,” she told an audience of several hundred people at Harvard’s Memorial Church Monday evening. “Many people thank me for talking about it, and mothers can tell their kids when they are upset with the diagnosis that Princess Leia is bipolar too.”Fisher was honored Monday with an Outstanding Lifetime Achievement Award in Cultural Humanism by the Humanist Hub and the Harvard Community of Humanists, Atheists, and Agnostics. This is the 10th year for the event and past recipients of the award include former U.S. Rep. Barney Frank, comedian Eddie Izzard, author Mary Roach, and entertainer Seth MacFarlane.Fisher, 59, was escorted into the Memorial Church sanctuary by a cast of costumed “Star Wars” characters including Han Solo, Chewbacca, Princess Leia, and a small platoon of storm troopers. The Harvard Pops Orchestra played the iconic theme music from the epic sci-fi film series as a tribute to Fisher’s work.“This is as close to a college education as I will ever get,” she said after receiving the award. “I want to thank you for playing the music from ‘Star Wars,’ and I was really worried that you were not going to play my theme. Not many people have a theme, but I do.”Princess Leia may be her most beloved role as an actress, but it is Fisher’s roles as an author and screenwriter that have touched the lives of many people living with addiction and bipolar disorder. She wrote about her struggles in her books “Postcards from the Edge” and “Wishful Drinking.”Fisher’s trials with the mental disorder were also featured in an Emmy Award-winning BBC documentary called “The Secret Life of the Manic Depressive.”Sarah Chandonnet, a 2009 Harvard Divinity School graduate and program director of the Humanist Hub, said Fisher was nominated in part because of her efforts to destigmatize mental illness.“To me, Carrie has always been the indestructible Princess Leia,” Chandonnet said. “But in that documentary I learned that she is so much more than that. She is a compassionate, funny, deeply flawed, deeply brave, slightly inappropriate, big-hearted, bipolar human.”Ditching her notes early in the speech, Fisher spoke openly about her battles with addiction and the emotional swings of bipolar disorder. Symptoms of the mental illness appeared when she was in her teens, she said. But Fisher was not diagnosed as bipolar until she became clean and sober.“I don’t call it bipolar because manic-depressive sounds like what happens to me. I was diagnosed a year after sobriety, but I did not believe it,” Fisher said. “I came out of rehab with some other folks … But as the year went on they all seemed to [get better] and I did not. I was so excited because I thought I was an alcoholic and that would explain what was the matter with me, but it didn’t.”Learning to cope with bipolar disorder takes a sense of humor, perspective, medication, and the ability to tap into a community of people with the illness for information and support, Fisher said. People who suffer from  mental illness should not be afraid to seek the help they need, she said.“I like to remind myself that I am self-medicated, dessert and food obsessive-compulsive, overly talkative … with no formal education,” Fisher said. “I think it’s OK to say, if some of you find out [you are bipolar], that Princess Leia is bipolar, too. It seems to relax people.”last_img read more

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Harvard-Yenching Institute names new visiting scholars, fellows

first_img Read Full Story The Harvard-Yenching Institute (HYI) is pleased to welcome more than 50 visiting scholars and fellows from major universities in Asia. Affiliates will spend the 2019-20 academic year in residence at HYI.Established in 1928, the Harvard-Yenching Institute is an independent foundation dedicated to advancing higher education in Asia in the humanities and social sciences, with special attention to the study of Chinese culture. The group of visiting scholars and fellows includes faculty members and advanced graduate students in the humanities and social sciences.Since 1954, nearly 1200 faculty and more than 600 graduate students from Asia have received Institute fellowships, including more than 400 doctoral and M.A. students who have received their degrees with Institute support. For more information, please visit www.harvard-yenching.orglast_img read more

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