‘There are still things to be done, but Haiti has improved a great deal.’

first_img Lieutenant General Luis María Carena: I have been on other missions, where the environment is different. For example, in the Middle East that problem isn’t going to be resolved because Syria, or Israel, or Egypt have their governmental structures and their economic structures. The problem is a different one. One is going to achieve a certain easing of tensions among the parties. And with that easing of tensions, the military objective is then fulfilled. Here the goal has been met, but there were others that extend beyond the military part, that are the ones about which one would say, “if that were achieved, then we would be done.” Haiti will not need a United Nations mission again, which would be the goal of all of us who participate. In one way or the other that is what we hope for, isn’t it? To leave the problem resolved. Diálogo: Has peace been restored to Haiti? One of the Argentine Air Force’s mobile military hospitals has been in Haiti since January of 2010, after the devastating earthquake that shook the country. In the days following the earthquake, there were more than 15,000 people who were potential patients for the hospital, due to new contingents that were arriving or increasing. To talk about this and other humanitarian aid initiatives provided by Argentina to other countries, Diálogo spoke with Lieutenant General Luis María Carena, Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff of the Argentine Armed Forces, during the 4th Annual South America Defense Conference (SOUTHDEC 2014) held in Santiago, Chile from August 11–14. Lieutenant General Luis María Carena: To a much larger degree than before. Today one sees a peaceful Haiti. Of course, that doesn’t mean that gunshots are no longer heard. Of course they are; periodically one hears shooting, since there is a part of the population that is violent and armed; that is true. But fortunately, now there are no groups that control zones of Haiti, that have territories, as there were before. Are there some violent groups? Yes, there are violent groups. Do they have weapons? Yes, they have weapons, but there is no state of quasi-civil war, nor anything similar. It’s pretty tranquil and friendly. Diálogo: Are there other countries where the Argentine Armed Forces are present on peace missions? Lieutenant General Luis María Carena: There may not be any super hospitals to be seen, but what can be seen are hospitals in operation, routes in certain conditions… Much is still lacking, but when compared to 2004, it is much better. Back around 2004, it was horrific, the poverty and the number of malnourished children, who didn’t eat. Malnourished children… I’m not saying that they no longer exist, but now it’s an exception to see a malnourished child. Before, it was massive; there were several per block. The situation is much better, although there still is a lot lacking, quite a lot. What the peace missions do not do is bring economic development; that is no longer a military issue. If there were more sources of work, that would be the ideal accompaniment to say “the situation in Haiti is changing for good, it will never go back,” but, well, that issue is not a military one. One realizes that is the part that’s missing. The State improved, as did the Police. The country is more orderly, but it is still lacking economic development; the shortage of jobs is evident. It would be good if people could earn money and thus live better, wouldn’t it? Diálogo: And as far as other peace missions? Lieutenant General Luis María Carena: Well, in Haiti there is the battalion that is in Gonaïves, that fulfills functions that are more security-related. Right now the hospital is in Puerto Príncipe and it is being relocated to another area near the capital. There is also an air group composed of two helicopters that provide support for troop movements and work on rescue efforts. They collaborate on a number of tasks. The mission in Haiti is one of the most complicated peace missions due to its environment and to the country’s fundamental situation. I think that in these ten years that the mission has lasted, much has improved. There is still more yet to be done, but things have improved a great deal. Diálogo: How? Diálogo: Could you tell us about the hospital model used in Haiti? What other examples can you give us?center_img Lieutenant General Luis María Carena: Yes. We have a complete battalion in Cyprus, and there is also the one that we have together with Chile. The southern ones are two battalions with naval and air components. We are assuming that in this coming year and the next one we will be finalizing this mission in Haiti. We hope that will be the case. Options are being studied in Africa and in those places that are currently a bit complicated and that surely… There are several countries that need help. But always within the framework of what the United Nations resolves when an agreement is reached and also, logically, to the degree that we can, because it is one thing to have a battalion when we are six thousand kilometers away, and it’s another thing to go to the middle of Africa; we have eight thousand kilometers of water and three thousand of land to get to where the battalion is. It’s a topic that needs to be studied militarily; it needs to be dealt with. It has a different logistical and human complexity as well, doesn’t it? If I have a problem with somebody in Haiti, in hours I can have that person in Buenos Aires, or that person can be sent to the United States. However, if I’m in Mali, the situation would be different. It’s not a question of saying “tomorrow I’ll go to Sudan,” and then afterwards, what do I do with eight hundred or a thousand men in Sudan? It’s not a trivial issue. Going to those places has its military complexity. There also needs to be a political agreement. Diálogo: General, to wrap up, what is currently the main challenge for the Argentine Armed Forces? Lieutenant General Luis María Carena: If we manage to get the Haitian authorities to hold elections for Congress this year and for the presidency next year, then the president would take power with a Congress. That would be a very important step for Haiti as a nation, to have the ability to organize themselves politically and legally. I think that would establish the conditions needed to make favorable progress. I also think that after these ten years, the military part of the mission is coming to its end. I’m not saying that all of the problems have been resolved, but I maintain that elections for Congress and the new president would be a sort of final stage in the process. After that it would be necessary to determine the exact appropriate moment to withdraw the troops. Nevertheless, Haiti is reorganizing its institutions, and that is work that takes time. Diálogo: Have there been improvements, in comparison to 2004? By Dialogo August 29, 2014 Lieutenant General Luis María Carena: I think that the history of humanity says that there is a constant activity that is called war… Since there have been writings, from what can be read in hieroglyphics… there were always wars. So I think that the concept of State is indivisible from the concept of monopoly of force. The Armed Forces exist because the State keeps the monopoly of force for itself. On a side note, I don’t think that we have a military conflict with any of our neighbors. The circumstances are not those necessary politically, economically, or socially for that to happen. But any State requires the support of the armed forces to exist. And the monopoly of force is called “armed forces.” That’s why we are in the Constitution. It seems that the authors of the Constitution knew something about what goes along with founding a country; they said that the Argentine Republic’s Armed Forces were Argentina’s Navy, Air Force, and Army. That’s why we are institutions that are present in the Constitution. It’s not that we’re in just any old book, no. We are constitutional institutions, given that we form part of the State to create order in society, and within this social ordering lies appropriating and keeping the monopoly of force. It’s something intrinsic, characteristic of the State.last_img read more

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Milner’s late penalty maintains Reds’ perfect start

first_imgA bold and patient sequence of passing in the left-back area ended with Milner injecting verticality into the move with a superb left-footed ball down the line.Mane, temporarily back in his usual position down Liverpool’s left, surged clear of Jonny Evans and casually slotted home his 50th Premier League goal for the club on the occasion of his 100th top-flight appearance.The Senegalese could have added to that impressive tally quickly too, but his connection on Firmino’s cut-back was not clean enough to beat Schmeichel as the hosts ended the half strongly.Second halfSchmeichel was forced into action inside the opening minute of the second half, the Leicester goalkeeper parrying away Salah’s shot on the slide from Alexander-Arnold’s cross.A double one-two between Salah and Mane then appeared to have afforded the latter the task of scoring from close range, but Jonny Evans’ last-ditch tackle denied him.Liverpool’s search for a second was gathering momentum and Firmino’s wonderful first touch bought him space to shoot after collecting Alexander-Arnold’s punched pass forward, though the No.9 dragged his attempt wide.The Foxes, however, kept themselves in the game and Liverpool need Adrian’s alertness, the ‘keeper gathering at Jamie Vardy’s feet as the striker bore down on goal, to keep them in front midway through the half.Dennis Praet drove an effort wide from 20 yards after Andy Robertson had blasted straight at Schmeichel at the other end and, 10 minutes from time, Leicester drew level.Ayoze Perez slipped a through-ball into Maddison’s path and the midfielder’s low shot beat Adrian.There was to be late, late drama, though, as Milner sent Schmeichel the wrong way from the spot to spark delirious scenes of celebration inside Anfield.******SOURCE: LIVERPOOL FCShare on: WhatsApp Milner. PHOTO via @LFC Liverpool 2 Leicester 1Liverpool, UK | THE INDEPENDENT |  James Milner’s stoppage-time penalty extended Liverpool’s 100 per cent winning start to the Premier League season by earning a 2-1 victory over Leicester City at Anfield.The Reds took the lead five minutes before half-time through Sadio Mane’s 50th top-flight goal for the club, but James Maddison’s 80th-minute equaliser appeared to have snatched a draw for the visitors.However, Milner kept his cool from 12 yards after Marc Albrighton had felled Mane in the box deep into injury time to ensure Jürgen Klopp’s team head into the international break with eight wins from eight Premier League outings this term.Pos. P W D L GF GA GD Pts1 Liverpool 8 8 0 0 20 6 14 242 Manchester City 7 5 1 1 27 7 20 163 Leicester City 8 4 2 2 14 7 7 144 Burnley 8 3 3 2 11 9 2 12Team newsDejan Lovren came in for his first Premier League start of the season as one of two changes made by Klopp.Milner also started in place of Jordan Henderson, who dropped down to the bench along with Joe Gomez. Harvey Elliott was also named among Liverpool’s substitutes.First halfA strategic tweak by Klopp saw Mohamed Salah start the game at centre-forward, with Mane on the right and Roberto Firmino on the left of Liverpool’s front three.And the No.11 had the game’s first sight of goal just four minutes in, rolling Caglar Soyuncu and attempting to steer a low shot into the far corner that was saved by Kasper Schmeichel.Brilliance from Trent Alexander-Arnold created a more presentable chance for the Reds in the 13th minute.The right-back nutmegged Ben Chilwell on the byline before standing up an inviting cross for an unmarked Milner at the back post, only for the captain to miscue his half-volley into the Kop.Leicester enjoyed their best spell of the half thereafter, although the visitors could not convert improved spells of pressure into goalscoring opportunities and Liverpool remained the more threatening team.Another fine delivery from Alexander-Arnold found a stretching Firmino, but the No.9’s volley cleared the crossbar. However, five minutes prior to the break, the Reds had their lead.last_img read more

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Lancashire offer to stage Test cricket during crisis as they post strong earnings

first_imgAustralia and Pakistan are also scheduled to tour England in the coming months.Old Trafford was originally due to host the second Test against Pakistan, which was scheduled to start on August 7.Should the current lockdown be relaxed sufficiently to allow cricket to go ahead, Tests could be played behind closed doors at “bio-secure” grounds with on-site accommodation such as Old Trafford.That would allow players and officials to be monitored while restricting their access to the outside world.“We have made a formal expression of interest to the ECB,” said Gidney. “We believe we have the capability, the experience and facilities on site in supporting them put on a bio-secure event.”Lancashire are also thinking big for when cricket can return in earnest — including plans to promote themselves in the game’s biggest market.“David’s legacy is to complete the ground redevelopment, a new stand, another hotel and work with the local authority on a leisure centre,” said Gidney.“We also decided after last year’s World Cup match between India and Pakistan to look east and an Indian growth strategy — to make Lancashire the second Indian team so if the fan say supports Mumbai Indians then their English team is us.“We are looking at both building the fanbase and players playing for Lancashire.“The objective is definitely getting more Asian voices involved in English cricket — it can only be a good thing for the game.” Fans watch a match between England and Afghanistan at Old Trafford during the 2019 Cricket World CupLondon, United Kingdom | AFP |  The coronavirus has left the English cricket season in limbo but Lancashire were dealt a devastating personal blow when they lost their chairman, David Hodgkiss.Just weeks later the Manchester-based county have returned record financial results — a fitting legacy for Hodgkiss, who died in late March at the age of 71 after contracting the virus.And they have put themselves in the frame to host Tests during the English summer.Lancashire, who chose not to follow other counties in furloughing players during the COVID-19 crisis, have announced their highest-ever annual turnover of £34 million ($41 million).EBITDA (earnings before interest, tax, depreciation, and amortization) for the Red Rose county in 2019 were £7.6 million, a 10-fold increase since 2015 and a record for a first-class county.“Excluding minority interests and one-off legacies it is absolutely a record,” CEO Daniel Gidney told AFP. “It’s a very proud day for the club.“A hundred percent it is David’s legacy. He was a mentor, a friend as well as a boss. With his construction background, without him the £60 million redevelopment (of the ground) would not have happened.“The board was the driving force but he was the centre of that.“For me a business problem to solve is like any other problem such as a recession but when you lose a friend it is an emotional kick in the gut.”– Test hosts? –Gidney said Lancashire, with a Hilton hotel on the site of their Old Trafford ground, were still in a position to host Tests this year.The England and Wales Cricket Board (ECB) hope they can kickstart a season delayed by coronavirus by rescheduling the three-Test series between England and the West Indies that was meant to take place in June, in July. Share on: WhatsApplast_img read more

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Late birdies see Stow pip his England pals

first_img28 Jun 2014 Late birdies see Stow pip his England pals It requires something special to win major championships and Ben Stow delivered that aplenty to win the Brabazon Trophy in record style in front of a cheering crowd at Seaton Carew. Birdies at the final two holes for a record-equalling 66 gave the Wiltshire man an aggregate of 278, 14 under par, and left him just a shot ahead of his England team-mates Ryan Evans and Ashley Chesters. “This is an amazing feeling after an amazing round,” he said. “This is a massive win for me. Apart from the Amateur Championship it doesn’t come much bigger than to win this English title. “Some days it is your day and it was mine today. I putted phenomenally. It just looked like the ball would drop in all day long. I had no idea how many I was under par but today was up there with some of the best golf I’ve ever played.” Stow (image © Leaderboard Photography) is back from college in the United States but did his experience there help provide this triumph? “I won in South Carolina in a playoff and to have that experience certainly helped over those last few holes.” The leaders certainly enjoyed the better conditions. The day began dull with a chilly wind but as the sun broke through to the birdies began to flow. Stow started tied on seven under with Evans and Ireland’s Cormac Sharvin. But he took a grip early on with birdies at the first two holes, set a hot pace by going out in 30 strokes and was soon the man to chase. His biggest threat seemed to come from Chesters. The European champion had three birdies in a front nine of 32 and after another at 11 he reeled off four-in-a-row from the 13th. That put him on 14 under and he might be the Brabazon champion now if it hadn’t been for a lone bogey at the par four 17th. “I was between clubs and pulled my shot into heavy rough which proved costly,” he said. “But I holed a couple of key putts. The one for birdie at 15 from 50 feet was probably heading off the green until it dropped. Then at 16 I sank a 20-footer for birdie. “I thought Ben, playing behind me, was also making birdies so I just tried to get as low as possible. If it wasn’t for that bogey at 17 that was the best round I’ve played. When I won the European I shot 65, seven under, and didn’t hit a bad shot. But there were one or two iffy ones today.” Evans, who had seven birdies in his 67, was naturally disappointed but he paid tribute to his team-mate. “Hats off to Ben, it was a great finish by him,” he said. “Coming down the last I heard the cheering but I didn’t know if it was Ben or Craig Ross had holed for birdie. “If I had shot 67 anywhere else I’d expect to win but if someone had offered me second place before the start I’d have taken it. “I felt it was going to be my week but not winning could put me out of the running for a place in the Eisenhower Trophy team. That’s important but we’ll have to see.” Scotland’s Craig Ross maintained his good form by returning a closing 70 for 283, nine under par, for fourth place while his compatriot Daniel Young was one of three in fifth on 284. Apart from Stow and Chesters, there was another 66 produced by Irish international Gary Hurley which saw him storm through the field and also finish in fifth place. “The felt more comfortable on the greens today,” he said. “They were less were more receptive after the rain and I managed to hole a few putts.” The 21 year old from West Waterford certainly did, finding an eagle on the 11th to go with his seven birdies. England’s Michael Saunders finished in equal 12th place on 288 and won the Scrutton Jug for the best aggregate from the Brabazon and Berkshire Trophies, while Ireland’s Moynihan, the other to finish fifth, collected the Henriques Salver for the best performance by a player from Britain and Ireland aged under 20. But the week belonged the Stow. He was always on the leaderboard and his victory meant he kept the trophy in Wiltshire hands by succeeding county team-mate Jordan Smith as champion.last_img read more

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Fynn Valley is England’s Most Welcoming Golf Club

first_img There’s a very warm welcome at Fynn Valley Golf Club in Suffolk – and they have a national award to prove it. The club was presented with the Most Welcoming Golf Club Award, sponsored by american golf, at last night’s 2017 England Golf Awards at Lord’s. The event shone the spotlight on great moments and achievement at all levels of English golf and the club was honoured alongside Olympic champion Justin Rose, Masters champion Danny Willett and Solheim Cup player Charley Hull, as well as other players and heroes from the grass roots game. “This award highlights that what we are doing is important,” said Director of Golf Ryan Parfett. “It’s a massive pat on the back.” Fynn Valley is a family business which opened 26 years ago and in a specially filmed video, company secretary Jenny Holmes explains: “We felt when we opened the club the most important part was to really welcome everybody, regardless of what they did for a living, how old they were or what gender they were. We had the same welcome for everyone and that’s the foundation on which the club is built.” There’s never been a dress code in the bar and the club aims to offer something for everyone, from beginner to low handicapper. As well as offering great golfing facilities and competitive opportunities, the club promotes fun golf for all and stages many social events. It’s keen to attract new players and holds an annual ‘give golf a go’ day, aimed at families, with fun golf on the range and par three course. It worked with PGA professional Alastair Spink to develop his innovative Here Come the Girls coaching programme for women which has been launched internationally as love.golf New members receive an extensive welcome pack and plenty of help to find playing partners, including a WhatsApp group. The club has a successful junior academy, which currently attracts 50 youngsters for coaching, and strong links with local schools. Club staff are kept up to date with everything that’s going on so they can help customers. There’s a strong emphasis on good communication using a combination of website, eNewsletters, big screen ads in bar and range, the local press and social media posts containing lots of photos and lighthearted news. “It helps to promote the fact the club is welcoming and not the lingering stereotype of old,” said Jenny. Now, Fynn Valley is investing around £1.5 million in a new clubhouse which, says Jenny, will keep the traditional welcome and see the club move forward as a hub for all the family and local community – not just the ones who golf! Click here to read more about the England Golf Awards Caption: Fynn Valley representatives receive their award from Dan Gathercole of american golf (Image © Leaderboard Photography) 15 Mar 2017 Fynn Valley is England’s Most Welcoming Golf Club last_img read more

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Old Fire Chunk Still not Hard to Catch

first_imgA. Ronald Freeman Jr., commonly known as Mighty Blow (formerly Nigga Blow) is one of the most talked about Liberian Hip-Hop/ Hip-Co rappers.Over the years, Mighty Blow has enlightened his audience with hit tracks such as “Old Fire Chunk (not hard to catch)” and “Strange Food In My Eating Pan”, gaining him a popularity and where he finds himself today as a international superstar/entertainer.Despite the many rumors and questions surrounding his music career and where he stands today in Liberia’s limitless entertainment industry, LIB LIFE caught up with the admired musician to find out the truth and to set the record straight once and for all about his career.LIB LIFE: Wow, I don’t know what to call you because I heard something about a name change, what’s up with that? (Laughter)Blow: Back in the days I was Nigga blow, but I changed it to Mighty Blow because of my manager. He told me to change it because of the general understanding that only a black man can call a black man “nigga”. It happened in Cellcom where I found white people calling me Nigga Blow and I understood what he was trying to say.LIB LIFE: Tell us things about Mighty Blow that we don’t know?Blow:  I was born and raised in Monrovia. I’m a Kpelle/Kru man from Bong County; my mother is a Kru woman while my father is a Kpelle man.  Back in the days in high school, I played football up to second division and thought that I would be a football player, but… (he laughs).  I’ve got skills up till now and plan on organizing a game with my crew Hip-Co All Stars and The State Runners Empire so people can see their musicians playing. From football I started break-dancing.  The dancing evolved into the whole entertainment business of music. I danced for 3-4 years.LIB LIFE: Wow, you’ve been entertaining people for quite awhile now, isn’t that so?Blow: Yes. Back in the day, even while I was playing football I used to like music. I’d rap at college shows imitating Tupac and Busta Rhymes, and it had everyone calling me Busta Rhymes in school. I listened to Tupac and learned his songs word for word. I used to listen to Biggie and Jay-Z, who’s my favorite rapper.LIB LIFE: With that said, how did you finally get noticed as an artist and into the recording studio?Blow: While dancing, a friend of mine named Ragga E, who works at Red Eyez Entertainment, heard me rapping freestyle one day and asked me if I had ever rapped in front of a crowd before. And I told him no. He actually inspired me to get into rap business because he said that I had a good voice.In that period of time, LIB records CEO Sammy Bokai Jr. came from London and opened auditions for fellas to come out and justify.  He wanted to form LIB records, and that’s how Ragga E took me to there and the CEO liked my voice. And I started to do my thing.LIB LIFE: I heard that your first track was prepared under troubling circumstances. Tell us about that.Blow: The 1st song I did was called “Tribute”. Our CEO along with George Weah took us to Sierra Leone (Salone) to record right after the war was over. While going to Salone, we had a serious accident and lost one of our friends named Tim. When we came back to Liberia we did a tribute song. After that incident, our CEO went back to London and LIB records split and everyone went solo.LIB LIFE: After going solo, what undertakings did you make?Blow: Well, “Strange Food In My Eating Pan” was my first single and also my very first hit song, which put me on the map. The track basically described me leaving my house with out giving my girl any food money, and then coming back home to meet chicken – chicken thigh in my pan – strange food in my eating pan. Where did she get it from because I wasn’t able to leave her with any money? (Laughter)LIB LIFE: That was your first hit single, but tell us a little about your second hit and how it led you to signing a contract with Cellcom?Blow: “Old Fire Trunk” made me popular and that’s when I signed a one-year contract with Cellcom.LIB LIFE: Must have been nice working with a GSM company, can you describe what it was like working with Cellcom?Blow: Working with Cellcom was straight up. But I only had problems with my own producers and manager.LIB LIFE: Rumor has it that Cellcom terminated your contract due to problems. Can you tell me about that?Blow: People contradicted the story saying that Blow had a problem with Cellcom. The truth is that people misunderstood this. I was with Cellcom and everything was fine. I signed a US$45,000 contract, was given a Nissan Pathfinder and we started operating. I used to travel and come back. The problem was with my manager and producer; they took a lot of money from me. Money I was to get from Cellcom. When they took the money and ran away with it, I went to Cellcom to ask about it when they told me they had already paid my manager. More contradictions came when one day I was in the crib when I heard my song off my album that I did with Cellcom being played by one of these street music vendors passing by. When I checked, I noticed that he had a duplicate CD of my stuff, and when I asked him about it, he confessed that he got it from the money exchange boys selling in front of Cellcom.  LIB LIFE: That really must have made you upset?Blow: I went to the boys that change money in front of Cellcom and met the duplicates there. I took the police for them and it had nothing to do with Cellcom. It was that scene that made people to contradict the story. In fact, my contract with Cellcom was already over by then, but I still used to visit the CEO and eat my small thing here and there. We were still cool.LIB LIFE: You just answered a major question that the Liberian community has always wanted to ask you. Now that we have that out of the way, what’s your relationship with Cellcom like now?Blow: I came recently and the CEO called me and told me to come over and sign another one-year contract and I’ve started doing the promotions and stuff. Cellcom is doing well for me, sponsoring me, taking care of my promotions, house, family and car.LIB LIFE: Now that you have again secured yourself and your career, what projects are you taking on right now?Blow: I’ve got my Hip-Hop and Hip-Co album coming out. Liberians only know me as a Hip-Co artist because of my two hit tracks that were done in Colloquia. But when it comes to Hip-Hop, I blow it as well. Liberia is my country and that’s why I do Hip-Co, but I want LIB to know that I can change my style and that’s why I decided to come out with a Hip-Hop album.LIB LIFE: That’s great and I wish you success in that. With the growing population of artists in the industry, do you think it will be a challenge to create a whole new image of your rap style?Blow: I just have to step up my game because in every area of life there is competition. When you look at music on the other hand, there is a lot of competition because if you sit there and don’t put any music out there and someone else does, people are going to listen to that other artist. As for me, I feel I have to work; being the best isn’t all about telling yourself you’re the best, you have to work towards it.LIB LIFE: Before we go, would you like to share anything with your fans?Blow: In the next five years I want to see myself hitting the world, not just Liberia, but internationally. I want to drop a song that will hit the whole market, that’s my focus right now. Keep on loving me because I am doing everything to strengthen my game to build up fire!Share this:Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)last_img read more

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