Foster confirms new restrictions to come into force next week

first_img Important message for people attending LUH’s INR clinic The North’s First Minister says restrictions placed on Derry and Strabane is by no means a lockdown.The area has witnessed a significant spike in Covid-19 cases in the past couple of weeks with the incidence rate per 100,000, one of the highest in the UK, at 322.6.The Executive confirmed last evening that new restrictions will come into force from next week.These include the closure of hospitality businesses, bans on indoor gatherings and a maximum of 15 people being allowed to gather outdoors.People are also being advised against any unnecessary travel into and out of the region.Arlene Foster, says while restrictions are being placed on one area, the whole North must work together:Audio Playerhttps://www.highlandradio.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/10/fosterwebfri.mp300:0000:0000:00Use Up/Down Arrow keys to increase or decrease volume. Twitter WhatsApp News, Sport and Obituaries on Monday May 24th Google+ DL Debate – 24/05/21 Arranmore progress and potential flagged as population grows AudioHomepage BannerNews Facebook Foster confirms new restrictions to come into force next week Loganair’s new Derry – Liverpool air service takes off from CODA center_img Google+ Facebook Twitter WhatsApp Previous articleIWT highlights protected area of Lough Swilly is deterioratingNext articleTrumps tests positive for Covid-19 News Highland Pinterest RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR By News Highland – October 2, 2020 Pinterest Nine til Noon Show – Listen back to Monday’s Programmelast_img read more

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Judge’s passion is making adoptions happen

first_img Judge’s passion is making adoptions happen Gooding helped whittle down 414 kids available for adoption last year to 258 Jan Pudlow Senior Editor When David Gooding was a boy, he heard his father on the phone with law enforcement officers, saying, “Well, bring them to our house.”This was back in the ’50s and ’60s when Marion Gooding was Duval County’s only juvenile court judge, and there was a delinquency shelter for kids who broke the law, but no place for abused and neglected children picked up in emergencies on the weekend.The youngest of six children would gladly share hand-me-down clothes and toys and build forts out of blankets draped over card tables with his sleepover buddies. Spared the details of their ravaged lives, little David Gooding just thought it was fun to have extra playmates for the weekend.Now that he is a Fourth Judicial Circuit judge handling dependency cases, David Gooding knows all too well about crack babies and splintered bones and broken homes, and all the tragic details that lead to severing parental rights.A year ago, more than 400 children in the Jacksonville area continued to languish in foster care, even though they were available for adoption. Judge Gooding vowed to do something about it.The end result is that adoptions have nearly tripled, thanks to a collaborative effort between judges, the Guardian ad Litem’s Permanency Project that recruited 38 pro bono attorneys, and social service agencies sharpening the focus on finding kids those “forever families.”“We have changed the culture of complacency,” Judge Gooding said.As a judge, he says there is no more significant order than a final order of adoption, and he sees his mission as “dealing with matters of eternal consequence.”“The government is a poor substitute for a parent. Children need loving, permanent families. Children need arms to hold them, ears to listen to them, and hearts to love them,” Gooding said. Red Tape Shredding JudgeWhen Judge Gooding explains how he helped whittle down 414 children available for adoption in March 2005, to 258 by the end of the year — including a whopping 52 adoptions in a single December day called “Family First Fridays” — he says it was “basically through good old-fashioned case management.”In short, Judge Gooding has mastered the art of cutting through red tape by holding people accountable and going straight to the person who can take care of business, rather than allowing cases to languish in the limbo of bureaucratic process.If the adoptive parent hasn’t finished the application paperwork and background information, he summons both the caseworker and adoptive parent to court to explain the holdup. Then he arranges for space in a conference room and gives the adoptive parent help in filling out the paperwork right then and there.If “preadoptive” parents have had the child for more than a year and say they aren’t sure they want to adopt, Judge Gooding will say: “If you don‘t want to adopt tell me why not, or why this child shouldn’t go to someone who wants to adopt.”“I don’t think anyone would be as direct as Judge Gooding,” says Richard Komando, director of the Fourth Circuit Guardian ad Litem Program.Gooding has even fired off friendly letters to governors of other states to enlist their help in cases where he has no jurisdiction.He chuckles when he tells about the letter he sent to New York Gov. George Pataki asking for help in getting a home study overdue for two years. Three days later, the home study was complete.“I used fancy stationery with a big gold seal that made me look like a big shot,” Judge Gooding said.Judge Gooding received the 2005 Adoption Excellence Awards (individual and/or family contributions) from the U.S. Department of Health & Human Services , which noted: “Since Judge Gooding has been in dependency court, adoption numbers in Duval County have risen tremendously. His efforts contributed to the overall adoption of 258 ‘special needs’ children in Duval County during fiscal year 2004-05.”Fourth Circuit Judge Waddell Wallace joined Gooding in dependency court in September and helps with the adoption effort.“It’s about actively managing each case,” Judge Wallace said. “It’s created a consciousness among agencies that it’s important to stay on these cases.” Rise to the Challenge Nancy Dreicer, Department of Children and Families District Four administrator, says Judge Gooding puts her case workers on the spot, and that’s OK.“putting pressure on the case workers, they rise up to the challenge,” Dreicer said. “He puts the child first and makes sure those cases go through.”She calls Judge Gooding and Judge Wallace “our secret weapons” in this successful collaboration that has made District Four — Baker, Clay, Duval, Nassau, and St. Johns counties — number one in the state in adoptions.Judge Gooding remembers when DCF Secretary Lucy Hadi first came on board and did what he called “a very brave thing.” At a meeting of dependency court judges, Hadi stood with an easel and marker and asked them to list their problems.“That’s courage,” Gooding said. “As an upshot of that, she gave us names and numbers of people in key positions in her administration and invited us to call when there are problems.”And, they do.Dreicer also gives credit to four community care-based partners — Family Support Services in Jacksonsville, Clay-Baker Kids Net, Family Integrity Program run by St. Johns County, and Family Matters in Nassau County.It was Jim Adams, CEO of Family Support Services, who was instrumental in bringing a traveling exhibit of portraits of children hoping to be adopted, called the “Heart Gallery” on display in art galleries and shopping malls.The pictures speak louder than words.“Everyone has their notion of what a foster child looks like,” Dreicer said. “This puts a face on the child. There are brochures and information about the child. Siblings are put together. And, hopefully, we can find a home for all of them.” Pro Bono Attorneys Leverage Action At the Fourth Circuit GAL office, lawyer Helen Spohrer directs the “Permanency Team,” thanks to a $25,000 grant through The Florida Bar Foundation. Administered by Florida Legal Services, the pilot project in Duval County uses pro bono attorneys to make a quick difference in the lives of adoptable children languishing in the system.It’s working.Half of Spohrer’s job is handling her own case load of children and the other half of her time she recruits pro bono lawyers to take adoption cases.She has succeeded in recruiting 38 pro bono attorneys to help what she calls “children caught in red tape” and do what lawyers do best: “communicate and get a case moving!”One pro bono attorney recruited is Paul Cappiello, of Harrell and Harrell, a personal injury law firm in Jacksonville. Cappiello works on brain injury cases and a federal national employment class action case.When Spohrer and Komando came armed with notebooks full of detailed information about what to expect, everyone in the firm agreed to take a case.“It is very satisfying to know that you helped a child find a permanent home.. . . It is exciting to see and even more exciting to be a part of,” Cappiello said.At Albertelli & Halsema, everyone in the Jacksonville firm agreed to participate in the GAL Permanency Project, which Jim Albertelli likens to “a corporate tithe” and work on the adoption cases is counted as billable hours.“Really, we get the best part of the case. You have people excited and ecstatic about building a family, and that’s what we get to be a part of,” said Albertelli. Family First Fridays The culmination of all of this collaboration takes place on the first Friday of the month, called “Family First Fridays,” where Judge Gooding and Judge Wallace hold an open docket for adoptions, modeled after National Adoption Day.The adopting parents must tell the judge why they want to adopt a child, and sometimes the answers are as simple as, “I love her.” The judges explain the proceedings are to make legal what is already true in their hearts. The atmosphere is celebratory with balloons and applause and tears, and Judge Gooding jokes, “It does cost the taxpayers in boxes of Kleenex.”At the December Family First Friday, Karla Grimsley, Fifth Circuit guardian ad litem director, traveled from Ocala to sit in the jury box and watch the action. She was so impressed, she wants to emulate the program in her circuit, where they now hope to do as many adoptions in one year as Duval County has done in one day.“I had never been to a court like this. The air was filled with excitement. Walking through the hallway was just packed wall-to-wall with children. The courtroom was standing room only. It was a court of law, but it had a different atmosphere. It was a happy time. It was good for the families and good for the system,” Grimsley said. March 1, 2006 Regular Newscenter_img Judge’s passion is making adoptions happenlast_img read more

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Friday April 10th Local Sports

first_imgWAVERLY —- Wartburg and Iowa State will square-off for the first time in a quarter century when the 2020-21 college wrestling season gets underway. The dual meet between the 14-time Division III national champion Knights and eight-time Division I national champion Cyclones is scheduled for November 6th at Hilton Coliseum in Ames. The season-opener will be only the third meeting in history between the teams and the first since Iowa State’s 23-16 win at Wartburg in 1996, the year the Knights won their first national title in program history. Wartburg finished the 2019-20 campaign with a 16-1 overall record and Iowa State finished second at the Big 12 Championships. The Knights are 12-11-1 all-time against Division I competition. The last time Wartburg faced a D-I opponent was in 2011, when the Knights dropped a 17-16 tiebreaker at Wisconsin. AMES — Iowa State women’s basketball coach Bill Fennelly says his team is focusing on what it accomplished and not what was lost with the cancelation of the post-season. The Cyclones were 18-11 and finished the regular season on a three game winning streak.Iowa State’s final game was a stunning upset of second ranked and defending national champion Baylor.Iowa State ended up 10-8 in Big 12 regular season play. IOWA CITY —- Iowa athletic director Gary Barta says they will be able to cover financial losses with reserves between now and the end of the fiscal year on June 30th. Barta says the department expects to lose several million dollars due to the loss of the Big Ten and NCAA basketball tournaments.Barta says they are looking at options for the next fiscal yearBarta says they will be looking at possible pay cuts in the future.Barta says they will be looking at several ways to save money. MASON CITY — NIACC coach Todd Ciochetto and sophomore Autam Mendez were recognized on Thursday by the National Junior College Athletic Association as the Division II women’s basketball coach and player of the year. Ciochetto guided the Lady Trojans to a 32-1 overall record, including a perfect 16-0 mark in Iowa Community College Athletic Conference play. NIACC won the Region XI title but did not play in the national tournament after it was cancelled due to the COVID-19 pandemic. Ciochetto wrapped up his sixth season as NIACC’s head coach with an overall record of 153-46. Mendez became NIACC’s first-ever national player of the year on Thursday. The 5-10 guard from St.Paul averaged 16.9 points per game in her sophomore year, recording 12 double-doubles. Mendez finished third on the school’s career scoring list with 1045 points, as well as third on the school’s career three-point and rebounding lists. Mendez has committed to continue her basketball career at San Jose State. THIS WEEKEND ON AM-1300 KGLO:Friday night at 7:00 — July 6 2007 — Twins vs. White Sox — Justin Morneau hits three homersSaturday afternoon at 12:00 — Iowa men’s basketball vs. Iowa State — December 12, 2019Saturday night at 7:00 — August 10th 2007 — Twins vs. Texas — Johan Santana strikes out 17Sunday night at 7:00 — April 12, 2010 — Twins vs. Boston — Twins first-ever game at Target Fieldlast_img read more

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