Seed pricing

first_imgPinenuts: further hit by the impact of the weak sterling, prices remain extremely high and, given that replenishment from the Chinese new crop is still some six months away, it is hard to see how there can be any major price correction this side of January 2011. Global demand for pine nuts overall has declined at these historically high prices.Pumpkin seeds: the availability of pumpkin seeds between now and the new crop is fast becoming a growing concern; China has now shipped its crop after its domestic requirements, and its new season supply doesn’t arrive in the UK before December/January. Despite the prevailing prices being significantly higher than any historical average for this product, China is to down-scale total production of pumpkin in favour of other better-yielding crops.Sunflower: demand for sunflower seeds is growing in a number of applications, including bakery. Despite a continuing rise in demand, with two key origins of sunflower rather than one the US continues to push China for ’sun seed’ market supremacy and plenty of other countries across Eastern Europe and the former Soviet Union producing big sunflower crops for the crushers, prices have remained relatively stable, despite the strong dollar.l Based on information provided by ingredients supplier RM Curtislast_img read more

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Top national award for Leicestershire golf coach Anders Mankert

first_imgGolf coach Anders Mankert, who changes lives through the sport, was honoured last night with England Golf’s Lifetime Service Award, sponsored by Bridgestone.Mankert, from Cosby Golf Club, Leicestershire, was recognised at the England Golf Awards at the Royal Lancaster London, which highlighted all that’s great about golf in England.Mankert was celebrated for the difference he has made to blind and visually impaired golfers and to young players making their way in the game.Guests at the glittering, black tie event – including influential figures from across the sport, volunteers, coaches, clubs and counties – applauded Mankert for his remarkable volunteer contributions which span more than two decades.He was nominated by blind students who put him forward for “being a unique inspiration and primarily for introducing us to the sport which has changed our life!” The judges agreed, commenting: “Anders has literally given time, expertise and selfless dedication over 20 years, helping to extend the game’s inclusivity.”Mankert said of his award: “It’s not why I do it, but it’s a lovely, lovely thing to be recognised for your efforts and to know that people actually care. It’s quite humbling and it’s the most amazing thing that has happened in my career.”His story begins back in the mid-1990s when he saw a group of blind and visually impaired players making weekly visits to a golf range. He realised he could help them, tentatively offered his services and has been working with them, and others, ever since, without charging a penny. “We have just carried on for the next 20 years!” he said.Mankert, an Advanced Fellow of the PGA and an honorary life member of the England and Wales Blind Golf Association, does far more than teach the technical skills. When one of his students was unable to find an all-important guide to accompany him on the course, he persuaded a local newspaper to feature the blind golfer – with the result that 17 people volunteered to help.When other students, often unable to work, cannot afford golf club subscriptions he contacts local clubs to ask if they will waive their fees. Some willingly open their doors, but it can also be a tough task – Mankert wrote to 15 clubs on behalf of one player and didn’t receive a single reply.But the setbacks are far outweighed by the achievements. The player who was very depressed after losing his sight overnight and is now British No 1, has competed in world championships and counts Mankert as a personal friend. The visually impaired girl who is now able to play weekly golf with her dad. The young offender who almost blinded his victim with a shot from an air rifle and was ordered by a judge to act as a blind person’s carer for a week. “It was genius,” said Mankert, who described how the surly, unhelpful young man transformed into a phenomenal carer.There’s also satisfaction achieved by player after player. “It strikes me that golf must be the hardest possible game for a blind person to take up,” said Mankert. “But I think they feel that if they can play golf and see some progress they can pretty much have a go at anything and you can see their confidence growing.”There’s also satisfaction for Mankert. “I get masses out of this. I have really enjoyed it, it’s very rewarding to see how something small on my part, giving up a little bit of time, has had such a tremendous impact. It’s unbelievable.”Mankert also runs a scholarship programme offering young golfers the opportunity to work like a tour pro for a year. They receive unlimited coaching and mentoring from Mankert together with support from specialists such as a physiotherapist and a dietician.He’s just awarded his sixth scholarship, selecting the winner from 387 applicants from across the country. One of his former protégées, Ryan Evans, is now a European Tour player, and another is a PGA professional, while all have improved their golf and grown personally and in confidence.“When I was young lots of people helped me and so it’s quite important to give a bit back, it just feels the right thing to do,” said Mankert.Caption: Anders Mankert (left) receives his award from Stuart Attfield on behalf of event sponsors Bridgestone. 22 Feb 2018 Top national award for Leicestershire golf coach Anders Mankert Tags: Anders Mankert, Award, Lifetime Servicecenter_img Top national award for Leicestershire golf coach Anders MankertGolf coach Anders Mankert, who changes lives through the sport, was honoured last night with England Golf’s Lifetime Service Award, sponsored by Bridgestone.Mankert, from Cosby Golf Club, Leicestershire, was recognised at the England Golf Awards at the Royal Lancaster London, which highlighted all that’s great about golf in England.Mankert was celebrated for the difference he has made to blind and visually impaired golfers and to young players making their way in the game.Guests at the glittering, black tie event – including influential figures from across the sport, volunteers, coaches, clubs and counties – applauded Mankert for his remarkable volunteer contributions which span more than two decades.He was nominated by blind students who put him forward for “being a unique inspiration and primarily for introducing us to the sport which has changed our life!” The judges agreed, commenting: “Anders has literally given time, expertise and selfless dedication over 20 years, helping to extend the game’s inclusivity.”Mankert said of his award: “It’s not why I do it, but it’s a lovely, lovely thing to be recognised for your efforts and to know that people actually care. It’s quite humbling and it’s the most amazing thing that has happened in my career.”His story begins back in the mid-1990s when he saw a group of blind and visually impaired players making weekly visits to a golf range. He realised he could help them, tentatively offered his services and has been working with them, and others, ever since, without charging a penny. “We have just carried on for the next 20 years!” he said.Mankert, an Advanced Fellow of the PGA and an honorary life member of the England and Wales Blind Golf Association, does far more than teach the technical skills. When one of his students was unable to find an all-important guide to accompany him on the course, he persuaded a local newspaper to feature the blind golfer – with the result that 17 people volunteered to help.When other students, often unable to work, cannot afford golf club subscriptions he contacts local clubs to ask if they will waive their fees. Some willingly open their doors, but it can also be a tough task – Mankert wrote to 15 clubs on behalf of one player and didn’t receive a single reply.But the setbacks are far outweighed by the achievements. The player who was very depressed after losing his sight overnight and is now British No 1, has competed in world championships and counts Mankert as a personal friend. The visually impaired girl who is now able to play weekly golf with her dad. The young offender who almost blinded his victim with a shot from an air rifle and was ordered by a judge to act as a blind person’s carer for a week. “It was genius,” said Mankert, who described how the surly, unhelpful young man transformed into a phenomenal carer.There’s also satisfaction achieved by player after player. “It strikes me that golf must be the hardest possible game for a blind person to take up,” said Mankert. “But I think they feel that if they can play golf and see some progress they can pretty much have a go at anything and you can see their confidence growing.”There’s also satisfaction for Mankert. “I get masses out of this. I have really enjoyed it, it’s very rewarding to see how something small on my part, giving up a little bit of time, has had such a tremendous impact. It’s unbelievable.”Mankert also runs a scholarship programme offering young golfers the opportunity to work like a tour pro for a year. They receive unlimited coaching and mentoring from Mankert together with support from specialists such as a physiotherapist and a dietician.He’s just awarded his sixth scholarship, selecting the winner from 387 applicants from across the country. One of his former protégées, Ryan Evans, is now a European Tour player, and another is a PGA professional, while all have improved their golf and grown personally and in confidence.“When I was young lots of people helped me and so it’s quite important to give a bit back, it just feels the right thing to do,” said Mankert.Mankert was presented with his award by Stuart Attfield on behalf of event sponsors Bridgestone.Click here to read about all the Award winnerslast_img read more

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Whitewater takes new direction with Nelsonite Malysh in ski school director’s chair

first_imgThe Nelson Daily staffSki School goes new school at Whitewater Ski Resort this year with a revamp of the program and several new faces in the mix.Nelson born Brent Malysh has been named Whitewater’s new Snow School director, along with veteran local snowboarders Peter Velisek and Dano Slater — Big Mountain competitors, judges and ski athletes — selected for the new Freeride Program. Malysh, 28, brings ski instructing experience from some of the world’s best mountains in Switzerland, Colorado and all over BC, and is a CSIA Level 3, as well as a Level 4 candidate. Malysh has re-designed the school’s children’s ski and snowboard instruction programs, making them more enjoyable and with an easier-to-understand curriculum. That curriculum carries over to the private one-on-one and group lessons, and the locals’ season-long programs like the Powder Room and the Board Room. After completing his Canadian Ski Instructor Association levels one through three at Silver Star, BC and Australian’s largest winter resort, Perisher Blue, Malysh accepted a teaching position with the Swiss Ski and Snowboard School (in 2002/03) at Flumserberg Resort. After three seasons there, he enrolled in Selkirk College’s Ski Resort Operations and Management program, then landed a job at the prestigious Beaver Creek Ski Resort in Colorado in the Adult Privates school. After stints at Penticton’s Apex Resort, and Revelstoke, he took the Whitewater’s Snow School director job. The new Whitewater Freeride Program will be joined by new Powderhound Experience, Discover Cat and Heli programslast_img read more

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