Supreme court rules that journalists do not need to have a degree

first_img November 23, 2006 – Updated on January 20, 2016 Supreme court rules that journalists do not need to have a degree 2011-2020: A study of journalist murders in Latin America confirms the importance of strengthening protection policies Reports RSF_en April 15, 2021 Find out more Reporters Without Borders is to challenge a ruling by Brazil’s Superior Court of Justice (STJ) that journalists must possess a university degree to be allowed to do their job, which it pronounced to be in line with the Constitution.“A journalist is someone who handles or produces news and information,” the worldwide press freedom organisation said. “Even if we understand professional organisations calling for a higher level of education, it seems to us to run contrary to press freedom and even to the right to inform people in general, to systematically demand that journalists should be university-educated”.“Journalistic competence does not a priori depend on entitlement but on experience in the job. Moreover, President Luiz Inácio Lula da Silva himself signed the Chapultepec Declaration on 3 May 2006 on freedom of expression and information which declared optional the possession of a degree and affiliation to a professional body. This was a complete break with the law-decrees dating back to the military dictatorship, which the STJ invoked to justify its decision”, said Reporters Without Borders. Judges in the first section of the STJ, one of the two highest federal jurisdictions in the country, decreed on 8 November that obligatory possession of a university degree in communications to be able to work as a journalist was in line with the Constitution.The ruling came at the end of a lengthy legal case started last year by José Eduardo Marques, doctor and consultant on a health communications programme in Bauru, São Paulo state. The doctor had obtained the status of precarious journalist (registro precário) in the framework of public civil aid. A ministry of work ruling abolished this status, since it did not require an ad hoc degree in social communications. Eduardo Marques appealed, saying that the ministerial decision was contrary to Article 5 – XIII of the Constitution, which allows the exercise of any work, responsibility or profession as long as it meets legal requirements. The doctor won his case in a lower court, but it was overturned by São Paulo’s regional federal tribunal (TRF) in October 2005.Eduardo Marques’s last appeal before the STJ then failed. In the grounds for its decision, the court relied on law-decree 972, regulating the profession of journalist, adopted under the military dictatorship in 1969. It also drew his attention to law-decree 83.284 of 1979, instituting the status of “contributor”. The decision was hailed by journalists’ associations. The judges of the Federal Supreme Court (STF) yesterday unanimously resolved that it should not be compulsory for anyone working as a journalist to have a university degree. The STF was asked to rule on this issue the same day that the Superior Court of Justice (STJ), another senior federal court, voted unanimously to make it obligatory for journalists to have a degree.Journalists’ unions and professional organisations yesterday immediately protested against the supreme court’s ruling, but Reporters Without Borders supports it, believing that anyone producing or handling news and information may be regarded as a journalist regardless of whether or not they have a degree.___________________________________________________________20.11.06 – One high-level court finds against another over compulsory degree for journalistsHours after the Superior Court of Justice (STJ) unanimously adopted a ruling on 8 November 2006, making it compulsory to possess a university degree to work as a journalist, the other top Brazilian jurisdiction, the Federal Supreme Court (STF), ruled in favour of maintaining the precarious registers (registros precarios), including for journalists. A São Paulo doctor, José Eduardo Marques, who acted as consultant on a health communications programme, had himself listed as a journalist on the precarious register before it was cancelled by the Ministry of Work. The doctor then took legal action and the STJ found in favour of the administration and professional journalist organisations, which favour the compulsory degree. The STF ruling now contradicts that of the STJ and the professional organisations plan to appeal to the STF against the ruling.______________________________________________________15.11.06 – Challenge to court ruling that journalists must have a university degree BrazilAmericas Help by sharing this information News to go further April 27, 2021 Find out more Receive email alerts News Alarm after two journalists murdered in Brazil RSF begins research into mechanisms for protecting journalists in Latin America BrazilAmericas Follow the news on Brazil Organisation May 13, 2021 Find out more Newslast_img read more

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Two bloggers released conditionally, two still held

first_img News Receive email alerts Photo : web.studentportfolios.ca RSF calls for the release of Bangladeshi journalist Rozina Islam, unfairly accused of espionage Bangladeshi reporter fatally shot by ruling party activists February 22, 2021 Find out more Organisation News BangladeshAsia – Pacific to go further RSF_en Two bloggers, Subrata Adhikari Shuvo and Rasel Parvez, were released from prison yesterday evening following a hearing earlier in the day at which Judge Zohirul Haque approved their conditional release at their lawyers’ request.Their lawyers disputed the legality of the proceedings brought against them, under which they are accused of denigrating Allah, the Prophet and Islam.The judge did not however grant the release of the two bloggers still held on the same blasphemy charges – Asif Mohiuddin and Moshiur Rahman Biplob. Their lawyers did not attend the hearing.Although relieved by the release of Shuvo and Parvez, Reporters Without Borders urges the judicial authorities to the drop the blasphemy charges against all four bloggers and calls for the immediate and unconditional release of Mohiuddin and Biplob.center_img May 19, 2021 Find out more News Bangladeshi writer and blogger dies in detention April 19, 2013 – Updated on January 20, 2016 Two bloggers released conditionally, two still held News February 26, 2021 Find out more Follow the news on Bangladesh BangladeshAsia – Pacific ——————————————————————————————–04.19.2013 :Four bloggers facing 14 years in jail and 100,000 euro fineReporters Without Borders is appalled that four bloggers – Asif Mohiuddin, Rasel Pervez, Mashiur Rahman Biplob and Subrata Adhikari Shuvo – continue to be detained in Dhaka on charges of posting “false, indecent or defamatory” information and “hurting religious sentiments” in their blogs. They are facing the possibility of a 14-year jail sentence and exorbitant fine of 10 million takas (100,000 euros).“The charges against these four bloggers are completely unfounded and stem solely from a lack of courage on the part of the Bangladeshi authorities, who have clearly chosen to yield to pressure from Islamists. These judicial proceedings should be terminated at once and the bloggers should be released without delay.“We hope their release is imminent but we meanwhile urge the authorities to order Asif Mohiuddin’s immediate transfer to an individual cell in which he can receive medical treatment. Making him share a cell with Islamists who were accomplices to a murder attempt against him is a disgrace.”Dhaka magistrate Hasibul Haque rejected bail petitions for the four bloggers on 17 April after receiving two reports from police investigators, one on Mohiuddin and one on the other three bloggers.Jyotirmoy Barua, a lawyer for one of the bloggers, said a Dhaka court that specializes in computer crimes would handle both cases. He added that the two reports are being treated as prosecution cases under Section 57 (2) of the Information and Communications Technology Act, 2006 (which was amended in 2009). The next hearing is scheduled for 21 April.Mohiuddin’s lawyer, Alauddin Mollah has filed a petition for special treatment for his client, who needs access to care and medicine because he is still suffering from the effects of the multiple stab wounds he received in a murder attempt encouraged by Islamists in January.His lawyer has also requested Mohiuddin’s release on bail on the grounds that no evidence has been produced of the crime he is supposed to have committed.Read the latest press releases about the jailed bloggers:- Call for detained blogger’s immediate release (11 April)- Blogger Asif Mohiuddin arrested over “blasphemous” blog posts (3 April)- First arrests of bloggers after creation of anti-blasphemy committee (2 April) Help by sharing this information last_img read more

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