Trail Mix January 2015 – Free Indie Music Download

first_img “Picture You” 3:46 — Sturgeon City “Waiting On You” 1. — Jellyfish 2015, it’s good to see you!Welcome to a brand new year of Trail Mix, everyone! 2014 was a spectacular year here in our little corner of the BRO website, where the best in Americana and indie music awaits you. If this month’s mix is any indication, the next twelve months will be just as fantastic as the last.Worth noting in this January mix are tracks off of three outstanding releases from Omnivore Recordings, a label dedicated to revisiting tunes from the past and reconnecting audiences with bygone artists. Trail Mix has featured a number of Omnivore rereleases in recent months, including tracks from Camper Van Beethoven, Big Star, and Game Theory. This month, the mix has two tunes from Jellyfish, a glam rock band who caught fleeting fame in the early 1990s, and Ron Nagle, whose record Bad Rice is now available on compact disc for the first time since its early 1970s release.Trail Mix is also excited to feature “Me, Liquor & God,” a brand new tune from Night Beds, a Colorado indie rock outfit that now calls Nashville home, and the latest from Drew Holcomb & The Neighbors, one of our favorite bands.Also on the January mix are tunes from Happy Fangs, The Amazing, Vision Fortune, New Line, Sturgeon City, and many more.The Trail Mix blog also has some good stuff cooking for this month. Stay tuned for interviews with Sam Lewis, Davie Smith & The Untamed, and Tom Baker of Packway Handle Band, who are releasing a record with Jim White.As always, stream and download the mix until you just can’t stand it anymore. Then stream it again. Tell a friend. Tell the irritating dude that sits two cubicles down. And, of course, seek out an album or two from these incredible artists. “I Need A Friend” — Ron Nagle 4:15 — The Night Beds 11. “American Beauty” “Gunsight” Those Green Shores Sturgeon City 12. “Me Liquor and God” — John Reischman & The Jaybirds — Jellyfish “The White Man Made Me Do It” 3:48 — Drew Holcomb & The Neighbors 3:22 2:38 — Sam Lewis – The Hotel Sessions 10. — Jim White Vs. The Packway Handle Band 5. 4. 2:40 4:46 — Happy Fangs “Gunsight” “Ma Mie Tant Blanche” 3. — Davie & The Untamedcenter_img 13. 7. 7:21 — Vision Fortune 15. 3:17 “Controlled Burn” — New Line 4:00 — La Famille Leger “The Blackest Crow” — The Amazing 14. “Francine” 3:19 read more

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Bashir’s exit from South Africa rattles International community

first_imgSouth Africa Rastafarians South Africa budget expectations Related South Africa Elections Coverage The incident involving Sudanese President Omar Al-Bashir in South Africa has raised serious questions about the ability of the International Criminal Court to arrest and hold accountable leaders accused of war crimes.It has also called into question the level of cooperation from member states in carrying out arrests. But perhaps even more worrying is the prospect of African Union states withdrawing from the ICC. CCTV’s Liling Tan reports.last_img read more

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Fynn Valley is England’s Most Welcoming Golf Club

first_img There’s a very warm welcome at Fynn Valley Golf Club in Suffolk – and they have a national award to prove it. The club was presented with the Most Welcoming Golf Club Award, sponsored by american golf, at last night’s 2017 England Golf Awards at Lord’s. The event shone the spotlight on great moments and achievement at all levels of English golf and the club was honoured alongside Olympic champion Justin Rose, Masters champion Danny Willett and Solheim Cup player Charley Hull, as well as other players and heroes from the grass roots game. “This award highlights that what we are doing is important,” said Director of Golf Ryan Parfett. “It’s a massive pat on the back.” Fynn Valley is a family business which opened 26 years ago and in a specially filmed video, company secretary Jenny Holmes explains: “We felt when we opened the club the most important part was to really welcome everybody, regardless of what they did for a living, how old they were or what gender they were. We had the same welcome for everyone and that’s the foundation on which the club is built.” There’s never been a dress code in the bar and the club aims to offer something for everyone, from beginner to low handicapper. As well as offering great golfing facilities and competitive opportunities, the club promotes fun golf for all and stages many social events. It’s keen to attract new players and holds an annual ‘give golf a go’ day, aimed at families, with fun golf on the range and par three course. It worked with PGA professional Alastair Spink to develop his innovative Here Come the Girls coaching programme for women which has been launched internationally as love.golf New members receive an extensive welcome pack and plenty of help to find playing partners, including a WhatsApp group. The club has a successful junior academy, which currently attracts 50 youngsters for coaching, and strong links with local schools. Club staff are kept up to date with everything that’s going on so they can help customers. There’s a strong emphasis on good communication using a combination of website, eNewsletters, big screen ads in bar and range, the local press and social media posts containing lots of photos and lighthearted news. “It helps to promote the fact the club is welcoming and not the lingering stereotype of old,” said Jenny. Now, Fynn Valley is investing around £1.5 million in a new clubhouse which, says Jenny, will keep the traditional welcome and see the club move forward as a hub for all the family and local community – not just the ones who golf! Click here to read more about the England Golf Awards Caption: Fynn Valley representatives receive their award from Dan Gathercole of american golf (Image © Leaderboard Photography) 15 Mar 2017 Fynn Valley is England’s Most Welcoming Golf Club last_img read more

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Hughton sacking highlights English football’s diversity issues

first_imgIn this Tuesday, Feb. 11, 2014, file photo, Norwich City’s manager Chris Hughton looks on from the dugout before the start of their English Premier League soccer match against West Ham United at Upton Park, London. (AP Photo/Sang Tan, File)LONDON (AP) – Norwich didn’t sack Chris Hughton because he’s Black. It fired him because it is petrified of dropping out of the Premier League and the millions in revenue that would be lost. Still, the result is the same: Every manager leading his team out next weekend will be White.Not just in the Premier League, but across England’s top five divisions.While English football prides itself on progress made largely eradicating racism from grounds and its footballers from every corner of the world, it is an alarming anomaly that more than a quarter of Premier League players are Black but none of their managers are. It reinforces for Herman Ouseley, the long-standing chairman of English football’s anti-racism body, Kick It Out, just how much the game remains “institutionally racist.”“There isn’t the drive and collective feeling of responsibility to become diverse,” Ouseley told The Associated Press on Monday from the British parliament where he sits in the House of Lords.“That’s because of the way they do business, the way they make decisions … it’s harder to be Black and successful in a process where there is no proper process and accountability.”Norwich’s commitment to tackling racism is indisputable. It backed police action against online abuse Hughton faced earlier this season.But while the club is unlikely to ever win the Premier League, its legitimate ambitions of staying in the top flight have been jeopardized by four losses in its last six matches. With the team five points above the relegation zone with five matches remaining, Delia Smith, the co-owner who made her name and fortune from cook books and television shows, will fear missing out on at least $60 million in television revenue next season if Norwich falls to the second tier.But 55-year-old Hughton’s dismissal Sunday followed a depressingly familiar pattern: no job advert was posted; no line of candidates appeared to be interviewed. Instead youth team coach Neil Adams was hastily promoted to his first senior managerial job. Critics argue that not throwing open jobs to a wider pool of talent, and simply going with football’s known – and overwhelmingly White – managers makes it much harder for aspiring Black coaches to get top jobs.English football has been exploring whether to emulate the NFL and its Rooney Rule, which forces clubs to at least interview ethnic minorities for top jobs.“It would be a huge step forward in England in terms of giving coaches and managers from ethnic minority backgrounds an opportunity to at least put their case forward,” said former Blackburn and West Bromwich Albion striker Jason Roberts, who retired from playing last month and has campaigned on race issues.The Rooney Rule was named after campaigning Pittsburgh Steelers chairman Dan Rooney. A survey this season of 200 professional players in England found 62 percent backed the mandatory shortlisting of Black and ethnic minority candidates for all non-playing jobs.But not all are convinced the NFL rule would work in English football. Even Ouseley accepts: “You can’t transplant the same thing over here.”There has been investment in courses for aspiring coaches – both male and female – from Black and Asian backgrounds which can lead to the UEFA licenses required for top management jobs.David Gold has been a football owner for more than 20 years, first at Birmingham and now at West Ham. He is White. He said a non-White manager has never approached him about a job.“When I hear this constant thing – it’s been going on for a number of years – this concern about ‘Where are the Black managers?’ … I have never interviewed a Black candidate because a Black candidate has not applied,” Gold told a football diversity seminar for lawyers last year attended by The Associated Press. “The applicants are just not there.”But ex-England striker Les Ferdinand, who is Black, thinks his skin color is slowing his progress up football’s ladder. While coaching at former club Tottenham, he has been studying corporate governance, along with 13 other former Black professional players, including Roberts.“I’ve always felt as a Black person I’ve never been able to hold a position of authority,” Ferdinand said.“I felt I needed to do this course in the hope I can go one step further and break into the boardroom. We talk a lot about how we are going to get more Black managers. Unless we can break into those boardrooms and show we can have positions of authority it won’t happen.”___Online: www.On-Board.co.uk/football____Rob Harris can be followed at www.twitter.com/RobHarrislast_img read more

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