Tokyo 2020 triathlon to start early to beat the heat

first_imgDon’t miss out on the latest news and information. MOST READ LATEST STORIES Judy Ann’s 1st project for 2020 is giving her a ‘stomachache’ As with the marathon, the potential for scorching summer conditions factored into the plans. The triathlons will start at 8 a.m. instead of 10 a.m. as originally planned.Japan is in the midst of a deadly heatwave, with temperatures topping 40 degrees Celsius (104 F). The heat has been blamed for 116 deaths.FEATURED STORIESSPORTSGinebra beats Meralco again to capture PBA Governors’ Cup titleSPORTSAfter winning title, time for LA Tenorio to give back to Batangas folkSPORTSTim Cone still willing to coach Gilas but admits decision won’t be ‘simple yes or no’The 1964 Games in Tokyo were held in October to avoid the harshest of the heat. That was before the Olympics schedule was influenced by rights-paying broadcasters and sponsors.The heat isn’t the only concern. View comments Hidemasa Nakamura, games delivery officer of the Tokyo 2020 Games, speaks on the courses of the Olympic triathlon, mixed team relay and Paralympic triathlon in Tokyo Thursday, Aug. 2, 2018. The triathlon events at the 2020 Tokyo Olympics will be staged on the large man-made island of Odaiba in Tokyo Bay and will start early in the morning to counter the heat that is expected in the Japanese capital during the games. (AP Photo/Eugene Hoshiko)TOKYO — Triathlon events at the 2020 Tokyo Olympics will be staged on the large man-made island of Odaiba in Tokyo Bay and will start early in the morning to counter the heat that is expected in the Japanese capital.Tokyo Games organizers and the International Triathlon Union on Thursday revealed plans for the individual triathlons, mixed relay, and para-triathlons.ADVERTISEMENT Sports Related Videospowered by AdSparcRead Next ‘High crimes and misdemeanors’: Trump impeachment trial begins Gov’t in no rush to rescue animals in Taal PH determined to surpass one gold medal finish in 2014 Asian Games Last year, E.coli concentrations were found to be 21 times above the accepted limit in the Odaiba area.Fecal coliform bacteria were also detected.Officials have blamed much of the problem on heavy rains last year, a surprise sanitation problem in a country known for cleanliness. The Tokyo Metropolitan Government has installed underwater screens in Odaiba and will study how they could prevent pollution from entering the competition area.With the Rainbow Bridge and the Tokyo skyline as a backdrop, organizers say the triathlon venue will provide a dynamic urban atmosphere unlike previous Olympics.“The location is perfect and it is incredibly exciting to be right in the heart of Tokyo at Odaiba Bay,” said Marisol Casado, president of the International Triathlon Union.ADVERTISEMENT Nadine Lustre’s phone stolen in Brazil In fight vs corruption, Duterte now points to Ayala, MVP companies as ‘big fish’ Lights inside SMX hall flicker as Duterte rants vs Ayala, Pangilinan anew Carpio hits red carpet treatment for China Coast Guard PLAY LIST 02:14Carpio hits red carpet treatment for China Coast Guard02:56NCRPO pledges to donate P3.5 million to victims of Taal eruption00:56Heavy rain brings some relief in Australia02:37Calm moments allow Taal folks some respite03:23Negosyo sa Tagaytay City, bagsak sa pag-aalboroto ng Bulkang Taal01:13Christian Standhardinger wins PBA Best Player award After winning title, time for LA Tenorio to give back to Batangas folk Palace OKs total deployment ban on Kuwait OFWs Peza offers relief to ecozone firmslast_img read more

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USC basketball notes: Stewart returns more determined

first_imgLodrick Stewart’s trip home to Mississippi for his great-grandfather’s funeral last weekend made the senior guard more determined than ever to have a future in basketball. Stewart’s family lives on a plantation covering a 10-mile area. He said his ancestors were brought from Nigeria as slaves, and that the slave owner left the plantation to the Stewarts when he died. Most of his family members have lived there ever since. “I just play better when he’s out there,” Stewart said. “I look up in the stands and see him and know it’s time to pick it up.” Been a long time: USC’s last victory at Arizona’s Mc- Kale Center came Jan. 17, 1985, by a score of 64-63. The Trojans’ 21 consecutive losses at Arizona are their most at any Pacific-10 Conference opponent. “We weren’t part of those,” said coach Tim Floyd, who was an assistant at Texas El-Paso when the streak started. “We’ve lost one to them.” Most players had no idea it had been that long since USC was victorious in Tucson, Ariz. USC has won its past twogames against the Wildcats, though both of those games were in Los Angeles. “Somewhere in the ’80s, I believe?” Gabe Pruitt said. “I just learned that today. Obviously, that’s a big challenge for us. I want to be a part of that, to make that history of being the USC team to go on the road and beat Arizona.” [email protected] (818) 713-3607 160Want local news?Sign up for the Localist and stay informed Something went wrong. Please try again.subscribeCongratulations! You’re all set! Lodrick and his twin brother, Rodrick, moved to Seattle with their father, Andrew “Bull” Stewart, and attended high school there. Lodrick had not been back to Mississippi in sixyears. “It’s not like here (Los Angeles), where blacks and whites live next to each other and are friends,” Lodrick Stewart said. “It’s different in the South. There’s still slave houses out there.” Stewart said he sometimes feels lonely living on his own in Los Angeles. He came to USC with Rodrick, but his twin brother transferred to Kansas after his freshman season. “I have nobody to turn to here, no family,” Stewart said. “I hang out with teammates, and they’re like my family. But it’s still hard because it’s not like blood family.” Stewart did get some good news on the trip to Mississippi. His father, who runs a gym in Seattle and has been to a handful of games this season, plans to attend every USC game the rest of the season, starting tonight at Arizona. center_img “I don’t care about driving big cars or none of that,” Stewart said. “All my money is going to help them get out of there. It’s about family first, that’s how I was brought up. I just want to make it, it don’t matter if it’s the NBA or overseas, so that I can help them.” He hopes to move his whole family out to the West Coast someday. last_img read more

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