A tribute to Robert Levin: The practice of performance

first_img“A composer puts a mirror to the audience and asks us to recognize ourselves. It’s the same as with great plays. Music is no less serious just because it is composed of tones, not words.” — Robert LevinRobert Levin, the inaugural Dwight P. Robinson Jr. Professor of the Humanities at the Department of Music at Harvard, will retire from the University in 2014. As a tribute to his contribution to musical life at Harvard, the Music Department will honor him with a concert in Sanders Theatre on Sunday, January 26, at 3 p.m. Internationally renowned pianist Levin will perform pieces that he commissioned, premiered, or that have been commissioned for him. These include Bernard Rands’ 12 Preludes, John Harbison’s Piano Sonata No. 2, Hans Peter Türk’s Träume, and Straccio vecchio and Sauce 180 by Yehudi Wyner. Knowing Levin’s skill with improvisation, there may some surprises as well.If it weren’t for a tiny post office in a Black Forest German town, though, Levin may not have spent the past 20 years teaching performance at Harvard.“I was senior professor of piano at the Musikhochschule in Freiburg,” recounts Levin. “One morning I was heading towards the post office—it was very small, with just one window—and I saw a man with a stack of packages heading in the same direction. I thought, ‘I’ve got to get there first or I’ll be here all morning.’ As I got closer I recognized him. It was Christoph Wolff.”last_img read more

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Schumer to FAA: Ban Drones from Drug Dealers, Private Investigators

first_imgSign up for our COVID-19 newsletter to stay up-to-date on the latest coronavirus news throughout New York Americans by now are familiar with the government’s use of drones to kill alleged terrorists—with civilians oftentimes caught in the crosshairs—or as a tool for surveillance, but it’s how some people domestically are using drones that has Sen. Chuck Schumer calling for stricter guidelines.New York’s senior senator this week penned a letter to the Federal Aviation Administration and Commerce Department calling for a ban on drones used by private investigators and drug dealers and a release of privacy rules and guidelines for private drone use by the end of 2014.“Confusion over the lack of regulations surrounding drone use is causing problems throughout the country,” Schumer wrote. “There are a number of unregulated small drones throughout New York City, as well as other parts of the state, threatening safety and privacy.”Schumer cited reports of private investigators spying on couples cheating on each other, people lying about disabilities and others involved in criminal activities. He also mentioned several cases of drug dealers using drones to deliver illegal drugs, a near drone-NYPD helicopter collision over the George Washington Bridge in July, reports of drones flying too close to airports, and a failed attempt by someone using a drone to fly marijuana and cell phones into a South Carolina maximum-security prison. The drone crashed short of the prison, he said.He blamed a lack of clear rules from the FAA for the “confusion as to what is legal, and the blatant abuses of this great technology.”“New York City has become the wild, Wild West for commercial and hobby drones,” he said.Drones are currently used by the U.S. government to aid in military operations overseas and domestically for border patrol operations, disaster relief, search and rescue missions, real estate sales and agriculture.Currently, the FAA says drones should be flown below 400 feet and a “sufficient distance from populated areas and full scale aircraft.”The FAA Modernization and Reform Act, passed in 2012, stipulated that the FAA come up with a plan for safe integration of drones by September 2015—a deadline the agency may not meet, according to a recent inspector general’s report, Schumer said.According to Schumer, President Obama will issue an executive order to have the Commerce Department develop guidelines and best practices for commercial drones.last_img read more

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Sports Briefs

first_imgChamps WI now third in T20s DUBAI, UAE, CMC – West Indies have slumped to third spot in the International Cricket Council’s Twenty20 rankings, just a month after emphatically winning the Twenty20 World Cup in India. They have been bizarrely overtaken by New Zealand who bowed out to losing finalists England at the semi-final stage of the recent tournament. The Black Caps are now 10 points clear of West Indies at the top of the standings on 132 points, after leaping from third place and overtaking both India and the Caribbean side. Following their four-wicket victory over England in the T20 World Cup final at Eden Gardens on April 3, West Indies had vaulted into second spot, just one point behind India who topped the rankings with 126 points. New Zealand were third on 120 points. Since then, however, New Zealand have gained 12 points without playing a single game, while the second placed India have gained three and West Indies, in contrast, have lost three points. According to the ICC, the West Indies suffered from the fact the points from the 2012-13 season, which included those from their maiden T20 World Cup triumph in Sri Lanka, have now been dropped. Lara: Return of Bravo, Pollard vital for Tri-Nations PORT OF SPAIN, Trinidad, CMC Batting legend Brian Lara wants to see the return of the likes of Kieron Pollard and Dwayne Bravo, for next month’s Tri-Nations Series involving Australia and South Africa. Both players have been overlooked by selectors for One-Day Internationals since the controversial abandoned limited overs tour of India two years ago but Lara said having them involved in Twenty20 Internationals alone, was a backward step. “In terms of the Tri-Nations, I think it’s going to be a pretty exciting Tri-Nations series,” the former West Indies captain said. “And hopefully we can have the likes of Pollard and Bravo some guys who have not played that form of the game [recently] back in the team because they are integral of any West Indies team. “Just to have them for the T20 version I think is doing a disservice to West Indies cricket.” Renegades open to Gayle’s return MELBOURNE, Australia, CMC Melbourne Renegades have hinted they are not opposed to re-signing superstar West Indies opener Chris Gayle for the new Big Bash season, despite his now infamous “don’t blush baby” controversy. The development follows the announcement from Cricket Australia’s chief executive, James Sutherland, who said recently cricket authorities here would not prohibit Gayle from a return to the glitzy Twenty20 showpiece. Gayle sparked a firestorm of controversy earlier this year when he appeared to openly flirt with Channel TEN report Mel McLaughlin during a live television interview, during a game against Hobart Hurricanes. However, despite a US$10,000 fine from Renegades, a verbal censure from Cricket Australia and widespread calls for a Big Bash ban, Renegades head coach David Saker said he was unaware of any move to prevent Gayle’s return.last_img read more

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TRANSFER SHOCK! Arsenal tipped to bring back former defender this summer

first_img1 Arsenal are hoping to re-sign former captain Thomas Vermaelen, who is also a transfer target for West Ham.According to Spanish newspaper Sport, the Belgian is expected to leave Barcelona this summer following the arrival of fellow defender Lucas Digne this week.And, although Roma have shown an interest in signing Vermaelen in the past, it appears that a move back to London is most likely.It had looked as though the Hammers were in pole position to sign him but the report states that Arsene Wenger is ready to attempt a bid of his own.The Frenchman has a history of resigning former favourites, with returns for the likes of Sol Campbell and Thierry Henry, and he could add Vermaelen to that list.Slaven Bilic, meanwhile, is in the market for new defenders having sold James Tomkins to Crystala Palace and reportedly believes Vermaelen could be a good option.But it has been suggested that any deal could come quickly with Barca keen to find a resolution before the start of their training camp next week. Thomas Vermaelen in action for Belgium at Euro 2016 last_img read more

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Strong security requires multiple roots of trust

first_img Leave a Reply Cancel reply You must Register or Login to post a comment. This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed. Continue Reading Previous Exploring the intersection of IoT, AI and quantum computingNext u-blox: 5G-ready cellular module and chipset for low power wide area IoT applications The quest these days for SoC and system designers is for strong security without compromise to meet the demanding security challenges of today. One important part of the security story is providing isolation between different applications. However, the reality is that isolation among applications in some security offerings today provide at best a roll of the dice.Let’s break this down some more. Ideally, the SoC/system designer wants to isolate different applications from different entities, meaning keeping them separate and protected from any vulnerabilities in other applications. This way each entity along the supply chain path has its own opportunity for security. Those entities are the SoC vendor, device OEM, service provider, end user, or other participant in that device’s ecosystem.Unfortunately, that’s not the case in some instances where they may all be running in the same secure domain. There’s no isolation between entities running secure operations. If a secure application is run, it’s in that “same secure domain” along with every other application.It doesn’t take much brain power to realize that problems arise because those different entities may not completely trust each other in the context of security. If one entity experiences a malicious attack, it compromises the security of all the other entities.Multiple roots of trust in a security processor, on the other hand, give the SoC/system designer a separate security domain for every entity. Those security domains are completely separated from each other using strong hardware security. Security assets like keys and hardware resources associated with one entity are completely isolated from those associated with other entities.In this security processor architecture, each entity owns its set of signed applications. All the context is flushed from the security processor when it switches from one application to another, and by default no data, keys, or other information persist in that processor. This ensures no context is shared between entities.Therefore, security assets are completely and securely assigned to specific entities. There is by default no overlap, meaning different entities cannot be allowed to access the same resources. However, overlap is acceptable if desired and assignments are properly made.A set of keys are assigned to each root in this architecture. This enables applications to be signed differently for each root. Consequently, each root essentially gets its own private set of applications. When the application is loaded into the security processor core, the root is identified, and then the hardware configures itself specifically for that root.Lastly, what’s important to know about this architecture is that keys associated with a root provide a complete, isolated set of derived keys the root uses. This means that one key can become many keys. Those many keys can then be used for a considerable number of different security operations. But every set of keys is unique per root, and one root has no way to access keys from another root, which is hardware enforced.Ben Levine is Senior Director of Product Management for the Rambus Cryptography Products Group. Previous roles at Rambus include Technical Director, focusing on hardware security cores, and Director of Engineering, managing hardware and software teams. His technical expertise includes ASIC design, hardware security, system security, computer architecture, and system design. Ben was previously a research faculty member at CMU and an Assistant Professor at the University of Pittsburgh. He has a BS and MS in Electrical Engineering from the University of Tennessee at Knoxville, and a Ph.D. in Electrical and Computer Engineering from CMU. center_img Share this:TwitterFacebookLinkedInMoreRedditTumblrPinterestWhatsAppSkypePocketTelegram Tags: Design Methods last_img read more

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Salah in diving storm as Liverpool win at Palace

first_imgLondon, Aug 21 (AFP) Mohamed Salah was engulfed in a diving storm as the Liverpool star won the controversial penalty that inspired their 2-0 win over 10-man Crystal Palace. Salah was accused of diving by Palace when he tumbled in the penalty area late in the first half at Selhurst Park. Referee Michael Oliver awarded a spot-kick for Mamadou Sakho’s challenge on the Egypt winger and James Milner converted the penalty. Former Manchester United defender Gary Neville, working for Sky Sports, claimed it was a dive, saying: “A lot of people won’t like it. If it’s against you, you’ll think it’s soft. “It is a theatrical fall which we’ve seen a lot of players do.” Adding insult to injury for Palace, Aaron Wan-Bissaka was sent off in the second half for bringing down Salah as he raced clear. Taking advantage of their numerical superiority, Jurgen Klopp’s side made sure of extending their 100 percent start to the Premier League season thanks to Sadio Mane’s goal in stoppage-time. Palace boss Roy Hodgson was furious with the penalty, saying: “My frustration is I don’t think that’s a penalty. It’s cause for anger and disappointment. “I’ve been in football a long time. If that’s a penalty the game has changed beyond all recognition. “Sakho is a defender and he has to try and defend. “There is no way he is looking to foul the player. Liverpool didn’t deserve to be leading.” Klopp side-stepped the diving row, claiming he hadn’t seen the incident clearly. “I didn’t ask Mo about that. I didn’t see it. It looked like it was (a penalty), but I have no idea,” he said.advertisement After Manchester City’s swaggering demolition of Huddersfield on Sunday, it was important for Liverpool to keep pace with the champions, even at this early stage of the season. This was a statement win for Klopp’s team, installed as City’s most likely challengers, and they move into second place after building on last weekend’s rout of West Ham. But Klopp refused to talk up Liverpool’s title chances. “I am not interested in sending statements to Manchester City or anyone else. I want to win football games,” he said. “I couldn’t care less really. We are not in a race with other Premier League teams each weekend.” Right from the start, Salah was in the thick of the action when he surged onto Naby Keita’s long pass, but the Egyptian’s chip sailed high over the bar. Andros Townsend came within inches of giving Palace the lead against the run of play when he cut in from the right flank and unleashed a superb 25-yard strike that cannoned off the crossbar. – ‘Cheat’ chants -================== Klopp’s men finally made the breakthrough just seconds before half-time. Roberto Firmino’s pass found Salah just inside the Palace area and when Sakho caught him with an out-stretched leg, the Egyptian’s slightly delayed tumble didn’t dissuade Oliver from giving the penalty. Salah has previous for diving and incensed Palace fans were quick to aim “cheat” chants at him, but there appeared just enough contact to warrant the spot-kick. Milner, ignoring the sound and fury, nervelessly sent Wayne Hennessey the wrong way with his spot-kick. After Wilfried Zaha’s run earned a second-half free-kick in a dangerous position, Palace captain Luka Milivojevic whipped the set-piece goalwards, only for Liverpool keeper Alisson Becker to make a superb save low to his left. Salah didn’t tire despite his prodigious work-rate and it was his blistering break that induced the lunge from Wan-Bissaka which triggered his red card. The young full-back, who had been left alone as the last line of defence, hardly made contact with Salah, but again Oliver ruled in Liverpool’s favour. As Palace threw men forward in the final moments, Senegal winger Mane put the result beyond doubt when he sprinted clear, rounded Hennessey and slotted home. “In these moments the fuel is really low and maybe the players need a bit of help from an angry manager — ‘run or I will kill you’ — and they did that,” Klopp smiled. (AFP) ATKATKlast_img read more

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Reaction to Bruce McArthur pleading guilty to 8 counts of firstdegree murder

first_imgTORONTO — Here’s a look at reaction to serial killer Bruce McArthur pleading guilty to eight counts of first-degree murder:___“Bruce McArthur has pled guilty, and that’s closure. I’m not considering it a win. It’s the right outcome … it was sparing the community, sparing the family members, of potentially seeing graphic evidence tendered in court.” — Det. David Dickinson, Toronto homicide squad___“It was a terrible case.” — Justice John McMahon, following McArthur’s guilty plea___“These losses have forever changed the lives of families, friends, loved ones and have left our communities shaken and aggrieved. The fact that it remained unknown and unseen for so many years is its own inconceivable tragedy.” — The 519, a community organization serving Toronto’s LGBTQ communities____“It’s actually quite relieving, I think, because we have an answer now. He’s pled guilty and I think that puts the community and the family at rest to say that we have closure now, finally.” — Haran Vijayanathan, executive director at the Alliance for South Asian AIDS Prevention___“Throughout this case, I have said our city deserves two things: justice and answers. I know that the public continues to have many questions related to this case, and so do I.” — Toronto Mayor John Tory.____ The Canadian Presslast_img read more

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