New Illustra DVD Released: “Call of the Cosmos”

first_img(Visited 697 times, 1 visits today)FacebookTwitterPinterestSave分享0 Illustra’s newest DVD showcases Psalm 19 in multiple ways.A new feature-length DVD has just been released by Illustra Media, producers of The Privileged Planet. Here is the trailer for “The Call of the Cosmos” —Psalm 19:1 famously says, “The heavens declare the glory of God.” The tools of modern astronomy enable us to see that glory as never before. As usual, Illustra brings ancient truths to glorious modern life through fantastic images, narration and interviews, and expansive music. The DVD includes seven episodes woven together that answer questions and explore mysteries about the universe and man’s place in it:How big is the universe?Are there really more stars than grains of sand?How could God care about humans on such a “pale blue dot” in a vast universe?Hear what a famous agnostic, author of God and the Astronomers, admitted about his agnosticism.Learn about beautiful auroras and how they connect to the earth’s habitability.Watch how a total solar eclipse unlocked secrets of the universe.What did astronauts say on the first trip to the moon?Be inspired by a collection of the finest space images, Scriptures and music.Those familiar with the short classic “Powers of Ten” will enjoy the opening presentation of a journey to the limits of the universe, with probably the most accurate portrayal of the large-scale structure of galaxy clusters and superclusters ever made. Each episode flows into the next seamlessly, allowing viewing by chapters separately or as one hour-long visual adventure.Quicksleeve cover. Obtain bulk copies on sale.DVD’s are declining in popularity, but not as fast as expected. There is still a significant demographic that enjoys having hard copy. There are two formats for obtaining this film in DVD format: (1) in a standard clamshell case, you can have it as part of your video library. (2) In quicksleeve format, you can obtain small copies in bulk for ministry handouts. For a short time, there is a sale on The Call of the Cosmos where you can buy 50 for $75.* Consider buying bulk copies to use as Christmas gifts, stocking stuffers or handouts to unbelievers. You can also share this trailer with people on social media by embedding the link at the end.December 24 will be the 50th anniversary of the Apollo 8 crews’ reading of Genesis 1 from the moon. This is a perfect time to enjoy and share The Call of the Cosmos with your friends, family, and acquaintances.*If you subscribe to RPI’s Newsletter and to Illustra Media’s John 10:10 Project, you will get notifications of when the sale prices are available. As of this writing, you can order at the sale price now at Go2RPI.com.last_img read more

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Seeing home with an outsider’s eyes

first_imgJacob DlaminiI have been gone from Katlehong, the East Rand township in which I was born, for so long that I have come to look at it with something of a foreigner’s eye. This is unnerving –  I have become an outsider in the land of my birth, a place whose sights, sounds, smells, textures and foods constitute a significant part of my being.Not so long ago, a cousin and I were driving to a funeral in the township when I asked him for directions. I expected him to say: “Drive down one street, make a left at the first traffic lights and go up the street, follow the circular road around  Katlehong High School, veer left towards the Shoprite shopping mall in Hlahatsi section and turn right on your second side street and voila!”Instead, he said: “Drive to Tsolo section.” I knew there was a neighbourhood called Tsolo but I had absolutely no idea where the place was. I had clean lost my bearings.To my cousin, I was still a kasie boy and should have known where everything was. That is why he gave me directions the way one would to a local. It did not matter to him that I had not lived in Katlehong for any length of time in about 20 years.But seeing Katlehong with an outsider’s eyes has an advantage: it allows me to follow what has changed in the township.The first sign of change to hit me when I moved back in December was the proliferation of shopping malls pretty much in every corner of the township. There are at least three massive malls anchored by Shoprite-Checkers and one centred on a Spar supermarket.My introduction to these malls was during the festive season, when people shop like it is the end of the world, but the shopping traffic at these places has not dropped even after the end of the holiday season. Go to any of these malls and their supermarkets at any time of day and you best be prepared for long queues. It is not bad service. The service is actually quite good. The shops are just busy.But that is not the most dramatic change I have noticed.The most eye-popping change for me has been in the way people go about their business and the way the local council, whatever its problems and weaknesses, is trying to make a difference.More and more sections have tarred roads and those that do not yet have any, are being surveyed so they will soon be tarred.Our local councillor has deliberately decided to have her block be the last street in our area to have a tarred road. This is both good politics and a result of lessons learnt the hard way. It used to be that councillors would take care of their own streets and families first before worrying about the rest. Not our councillor.Her selflessness may not please her immediate neighbours, but they can at least see that she is working for the entire community and that a tarred road will eventually their way.Then there are the mundane things that we hardly ever notice unless we need to use them but that actually make neighbourhoods tick. I was stunned to see a postman on his bike on Christmas Eve delivering mail to houses. I was prepared to think this was a fluke until I saw the same guy again on New Year’s Eve, doing his rounds.For someone long used to stories about how South Africa shuts down every year from 16 December to the first week of January, it was both a revelation and a pleasure to see the postman and to walk into a post office on 24 December and find it open for service.It was the same with garbage collection. The collectors came around on Christmas Eve and New Year’s Eve. They work to a calendar and, although they were on a holiday schedule, they came around on days I would have least expected them to show up.And they did not look like they were half-arseing their way through their shift, only eager to finish quickly and knock off. They took their time, collected everyone’s bins from the central collection point and returned them where they found them. It was a pleasure to watch.After all, it is of such basic things that livable, working cities the world over are made.But the best sign for me that things are changing for the better was the phone call my cousin and I placed to 10111, the police emergency number, after coming across a domestic dispute while walking to a mall one evening shortly after New Year.A man was manhandling a woman and when we asked him to stop, he defiantly told us to walk on as it was none of our business. We told him we would call the cops.“Go ahead!” he said. We did. Two police vans showed up within 30 minutes and before our domestic abuser knew it, he was surrounded by eight armed policemen. They gave him a tongue-lashing he is unlikely to forget anytime soon. They also thanked us for calling in the incident.Needless to say, things are far from rosy in Katlehong. Jobs are scarce, HIV/Aids is a serious problem, crime continues to bedevil us and the local council could do better, to put it politely. But things are changing and, what’s more, they seem to be changing for the better. Even a native foreigner like me can see that.Jacob Dlamini is a PhD student in History at Yale University, a columnist for The Weekender, and former political editor of Business Day.last_img read more

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SolarCity is Getting Into the Roofing Shingle Business

first_imgNew solar panel plant is hugeSolarCity’s new plant measures a sprawling 1.2 million square feet, and will be capable of turning out 10,000 solar panels a day when it’s fully up to speed, a CNBC report said. That adds up to a total solar capacity of 1 gigawatt of electricity a year.The factory is being constructed with a lot of help from the state of New York. In May, CNBC reported, New York’s Public Authorities Control Board approved a grant of $485.5 million, part of a total of $750 million New York will chip in to build and equip the plant. Once complete, the plant will be owned by New York and leased to SolarCity.With SolarCity producing its own solar panels, the company becomes a vertically integrated operation, controlling everything from production to installation. At the same time, Musk’s Tesla electric-car company, which is planning to buy SolarCity, is building a “gigafactory” of its own in Sparks, Nevada, to make lithium ion batteries. The batteries would help drive down the cost of powering Tesla’s electric vehicles, but it also would increase Tesla’s capacity to produce its Powerwall storage batteries for PV systems.“Batteries are the missing piece in allowing sustainable energy to scale up to 100% of our energy needs,” Tesla co-founder and chief technology officer J.B. Straubel told KQED. “We’re confident that eventually just about every vehicle on the road will move to being electric. That’s changing the transportation landscape. That’s changing the energy landscape. It is changing the world.”With a big bump in capacity for solar panels — both conventional and building-integrated varieties — plus more battery capacity, SolarCity would seemingly be poised for real PV dominance. But in the short term, it hasn’t been easy sailing. The company has yet to make a profit, and stock prices have dropped from a high of $57 last December to less than $24 in mid-August. Earlier this week, the company announced a corporate restructuring that will include layoffs and reduced executive pay. CEO Rive will see his salary go from $275,000 to $1 a year. PRODUCT GUIDEBuilding Integrated Photovoltaic Systems Problems that Dow ran intoDow couldn’t make that formula work. The company launched Powerhouse shingles in 2011, but the copper indium gallium selenide (CIGS) cells were not as efficient as PV modules that use crystalline silicon, plus they were more expensive. Pricing information posted at the Dow website suggested the solar premium for Powerhouse shingles added up to about $5 per watt, some 40% more than today’s average price for silicon-based PV modules.Dow introduced a beefed-up version of the panels last year. They had better power density and were easier to install, the company said, but that wasn’t enough. Dow pulled the plug on June 28, 2016, with an announcement that it would stop manufacturing the shingles and would no longer provide design services for new projects.SolarCity didn’t say how its BIPV shingles would be made, or disclose how much they would cost. PV-Tech reported that the shingles wold be custom-made for each installation and would be delivered in the form of a kit to be installed by SolarCity. RELATED ARTICLES “So there [is a] huge market that is sort of inaccessible to SolarCity because people know they are going to have to replace the roof and you don’t want to put solar panels on a roof you know you are going to replace,” Musk said. “However, if your roof is nearing end of life, and you have to get a new roof anyway… why not have a solar roof that is better in many other ways as well?” Dow Drops Its Line of Solar ShinglesSolar Panels That Don’t Look Like Solar PanelsAn Introduction to Photovoltaic Systems Earlier this summer, Dow Chemical abandoned its building-integrated photovoltaic (BIPV) roofing shingle business after a run of less than five years. SolarCity, the country’s biggest solar installer, is betting that corner of the market still holds untapped potential.In a conference call with financial analysts earlier this month, SolarCity Chairman Elon Musk disclosed that when the company’s huge new manufacturing plant in Buffalo, New York, opens next year, the factory will produce BIPV shingles as well as conventional photovoltaic (PV) modules.“It’s a solar roof, as opposed to modules on a roof,” Musk said, according to an article published by Business Insider. “I think this is really a fundamental part of achieving differentiated product strategy, where you have a beautiful roof. It’s not a thing on the roof. It is the roof, which is a quite difficult engineering challenge and not something that is available anywhere else.”Neither Musk nor SolarCity CEO Lyndon Rive, Musk’s cousin, offered many details about the venture. Rive said that SolarCity would concentrate on the 5 million new roofs built every year in the U.S., so the company wouldn’t “cannibalize” its ongoing business of installing PV panels on houses that are already built.last_img read more

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Does big data today keep the doctor away?

first_imgIs Voice Search the Next Big Travel Technology … There’s a small cadre of highly skilled big data professionals and doctors who are leveraging technology to help you live a longer, healthier life. Armed with mountains of government-funded genomic data sets along with mature and easily accessible analytics tools, these technicians and doctors are building apps, tools, and systems which can help you diagnose and treat illnesses ranging from common to catastrophic.Leading that charge is Dexter Hadley, unique in that he is both an engineer and a doctor. Dexter runs the Hadley Lab – a big data laboratory at UCSF Health which develops tech to fight disease and promote health. The Hadley Lab has a mandate to derive value from the mountains of clinical data that UCSF continually generates.  With a research background in genomics and clinical training in pathology, Dexter likes to quip that he “uses big data to practice medicine.”We got a chance to ask Dexter about the innovations that are born at the intersection of technology and medicine and tell us about how the democratization of technology is really impacting people’s lives.So first off, people are probably wondering why and how you became both a doctor AND an engineer?I have always wanted to be a doctor, but my trajectory changed dramatically when I taught myself to program computers at the age of 10 years old. Since then, I have been obsessed with how to leverage computation to better facilitate medicine. That journey took me from an undergraduate education focused on computer programming to medical school at University of Pennsylvania where I earned a master’s degree in engineering, a Ph.D. in genomics, and an MD for good measure. Through stints practicing medicine in an internship in general surgery at Penn, and then later residency in pathology at Stanford, I developed a passion as a physician/scientist to integrate medicine and software engineering in order to improve the delivery of healthcare for doctors and their patients.So, what does the Hadley Lab do and how do you contribute?The Hadley Laboratory leverages big data to improve the practice of medicine and the delivery of healthcare.  Our work generates, annotates, and ultimately reasons over large and diverse data stores to better characterize disease. We develop state-of-the-art data-driven models of clinical intelligence that drive clinical applications to more precisely screen, diagnose, and manage disease. We integrate multiple large data stores to identify novel biomarkers and potential therapeutics for disease. The end point of our work is rapid proofs of concept clinical trials in humans that translate into better patient outcomes and reduced morbidity and mortality across the disease spectrum.  “I’m an equal opportunity scientist.  I care less about the best disease I can study, but more about what disease I can study best– it’s all driven by the data.   And what would you say is the present, future, and ideal state of R&D in this area?At present, I think we are experiencing a continued renaissance of medicine that started with the initial sequencing of the human genome well over a decade ago. Now, we are finally in a position to actually quantify human health and disease in “precision medicine,” a fundamentally different approach to healthcare research and its delivery where our focus is on identifying and correcting individual patient differences rather than making broader generalizations.  While genomics allows us to quantify our molecular self, I think the future is in leveraging all the technology at our fingertips today to better quantify our physical self. As the power of genomics lies in its objective ability to correlate with physical manifestations in the patient, the ideal state of R&D must involve data collection and analysis at both the molecular genotypic level and the more clinical phenotypic level of the patient.  For instance, in the context of a health system, my research integrates large clinical data stores with state-of-the-art big data algorithms, smartphones, web and mobile applications, etc. to first discover and then deliver precision medicine to patients.Sounds like a big part of that future is genomics?Genomics is indeed the future, except it’s clearly more complicated than we initially thought.  Most doctors don’t sit around looking at their patient’s genomic data to develop treatment plans. However, some specialist doctors look at images all day long, such as radiologists and pathologists for instance. We have technology and algorithms today that allows us to build ‘apps’ that can help these specialists. For instance, we are working on a mobile medical app for doctors and their patients to use smartphones to better screen for skin cancer. However, while digital health apps on smartphones represent a convenient screen for skin cancer, the actual diagnosis and subsequent management of skin cancer remains within the genomics realm.So, diagnosis is where the need is right now?The practice of medicine involves screening a general population and diagnosis of suspected cases before intervention on a specific patient. Much of precision medicine research has focused on diagnosis and intervention phases, with less focus on screening. My focus currently is using powerful big data algorithms for population screening of healthy individuals through digital apps. While “anybody” can build an app these days, not everybody has the knowledge, data, and access to the clinical infrastructure to develop clinical-grade algorithms for doctors and their patients.How big of an impact is the “democratization of technology” having on this space?About 6 years ago, Mark Andreessen penned a WSJ editorial that lays out the case for “Why Software Is Eating The World.” How does the average person shop today? Or bank? Or trade stocks? Or find a taxi? Mainly through innovative “apps” that we have come to depend on. I think that inevitably this phenomenon will percolate to our medical world where we now have all the ingredients to do magical things with tech, meaning cheap computation, awesome algorithms, and tons of big data that we continue to generate at breakneck speeds in clinical medicine.For instance, at UCSF Health, we literally have billions of clinical records over almost a million patients that must hold the keys to practice better medicine. If you think about it, the average clinical trial to prove efficacy of an intervention is practically limited to the order of hundreds of patients because of time and monetary constraints. Therefore, our modern health systems allow for the largest clinical trials most appropriately powered for rapid discovery of novel medical interventions. I think that building clinical grade apps based on this big data allows us to immediately deliver the innovative discovery power of our health systems to the hands of physicians and their patients.What would that involve, “building a clinical-grade app”?Building the app is actually the least rigorous part of the process as the ‘clinical-grade’ performance comes from the algorithms that we develop that underlie the app interface. The magic of what we are doing lies in learning patterns from big data that we generate in healthcare. Deep learning is one such method that is a paradigm shift towards ‘cognitive computing’ where computers are essentially trained to think like humans.  Deep learning on big data represents state-of-the-art machine learning today and repeatedly outperforms other more traditional methods. Data is the key piece of this process because these deep learning algorithms are incredibly complex. While much of statistics is based on linear models whose parameters can be accurately estimated with only a few data points, some of the most sophisticated deep learning algorithms have more parameters to estimate than there are atoms in the universe. Therefore, useful deep learning requires big data to accurately estimate parameters that are most predictive. Let’s say one of our readers is interested and wants to develop this app for you, what would you share with them to help get them started?I would definitely encourage them to reach out directly to me through my website. I’m also a member of the Institute for Computational Health Sciences at UCSF, which is dedicated to advancing computational health sciences in research, practice, and education in support of Precision Medicine for all.If any readers are interested in contributing to the project, you can reach Dexter at [email protected] do you think big data today will keep the doctor away? If you liked this article, read more stories about the data impact on the world at www.datamakespossible.com.This article was produced in partnership with Western Digital. Tags:#AI#Big Data#Hadley Lab#Healthcare#Internet of Things#IoT#M2M#UCSF#Western Digital Top Reasons to Go With Managed WordPress Hosting ReadWrite Sponsorscenter_img Related Posts FDA Extends Collaboration on Living Heart Proje… How Myia Health’s Partnership with Mercy Virtua…last_img read more

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Insights into What Adverse Childhood Experiences Study Teaches Us

first_imgBy: Bari Sobelson, MS, LMFTOn August 17th, Dr. Melissa Merrick from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention provided us with a unique opportunity- a chance to take an in-depth look at the Adverse Childhood Experience (ACE) Study and what it means for the future health and well-being of our children.The following are some highlights of Dr. Merrick’s webinar:Violence compromises early brain development.ACEs can have lasting effects on health, behaviors, and life potential.Of the 10 leading causes of death in the U.S. in 2014,  7 have direct associations to early adversity.Preventing child maltreatment requires understanding why some children and families are at greater risk.Early adversity can literally make us sick. And, not only does early adversity affect later health, but also life opportunities that can be protective for our health.Brown and colleagues (1998) documented a 19-year difference in life expectancy between those who had high (6+) versus no ACEs.The exposure to violence, especially in childhood, is a public health priority.CDC is committed to stopping violence before it happens. This is also known as primary prevention.Violence prevention is strategic. The importance of preventing early adversity has never been clearer given the impacts of health and life opportunities that reverberates across generations.Current efforts to prevent early adversity will be more successful if they broaden public and professional understanding of the links between early adversity and poverty and the structural barriers that reduce the likelihood of moving out of poverty.Are you interested yet? For detailed information on these highlights and more interesting facts and helpful resources, check out the archived webinar here:last_img read more

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Codiñera reminds PBA-bound Flores: Train hard, develop your game

first_imgCPP denies ‘Ka Diego’ arrest caused ‘mass panic’ among S. Tagalog NPA Typhoon Kammuri accelerates, gains strength en route to PH PH boxing team determined to deliver gold medals for PH PLAY LIST 05:25PH boxing team determined to deliver gold medals for PH00:50Trending Articles00:50Trending Articles01:47Panelo casts doubts on Robredo’s drug war ‘discoveries’01:29Police teams find crossbows, bows in HK university01:35Panelo suggests discounted SEA Games tickets for students02:49Robredo: True leaders perform well despite having ‘uninspiring’ boss02:42PH underwater hockey team aims to make waves in SEA Games01:44Philippines marks anniversary of massacre with calls for justice Read Next Japan ex-PM Nakasone who boosted ties with US dies at 101 Kammuri turning to super typhoon less likely but possible — Pagasa MOST READ QC cops nab robbery gang leader, cohort Stronger peso trims PH debt value to P7.9 trillion View commentscenter_img “The professional game is a different game. Everyone that you face there, they’re at the highest basketball level in the land. Everyone there is exemplary,” he said.With Flores is expected to be given heavy minutes due to the lean GlobalPort frontline, Codiñera is putting the pressure on his prized big man to outwork everybody in training camp hoping that his student reach the same level he did in his heyday.“It’s no longer developmental there. When you go to the pros, you should have mastered the fundamentals already,” he said.“What he’ll be facing there are finished products and he shouldn’t wait for them to break down. He must learn how to develop his game on his own.”ADVERTISEMENT Don’t miss out on the latest news and information. LATEST STORIES And after the 25-year-old was selected ninth overall in the annual rookie proceedings, the PBA legend is just hoping for the best for his former slotman.“I already told him everything I needed to tell him. All I can say is for him to have good luck,” said Codiñera.FEATURED STORIESSPORTSWATCH: Drones light up sky in final leg of SEA Games torch runSPORTSSEA Games: Philippines picks up 1st win in men’s water poloSPORTSMalditas save PH from shutoutFlores averaged 10.2 points, 8.7 rebounds, 1.8 blocks, and 1.3 assists in his final year with the Chiefs, solidifying his case as one of the top defensive players in the collegiate league.But for Codiñera, who built a PBA lore on the defensive end which earned him the moniker “The Defense Minister,” establishing the same reputation in the PBA for Flores is a different story. Brace for potentially devastating typhoon approaching PH – NDRRMC Kris Aquino ‘pretty chill about becoming irrelevant’ Jeron Teng glad to see familiar face at sidelines in Altamirano Photo by Tristan Tamayo/ INQUIRER.netBeing drafted is one thing, staying in the league is another.Those were the last reminders Arellano coach Jerry Codiñera gave to his hardworking big man Lervin Flores going into the 2017 PBA Rookie Draft.ADVERTISEMENTlast_img read more

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10 months agoArsenal favourites as Aston Villa disappointed after Cahill talks

first_imgArsenal favourites as Aston Villa disappointed after Cahill talksby Paul Vegas10 months agoSend to a friendShare the loveAston Villa have found the personal demands of Chelsea captain Gary Cahill too rich.The Telegraph says Villa had held talks with the 33-year-old but cannot meet the demands Chelsea have put on the table.The Blues want Cahill’s £110,000-a-week wages paid in full if he is to leave Stamford Bridge on loan.And the former England international is said to want a similar sum if he was to make a permanent move to Villa Park.Arsenal boss Unai Emery could make a surprise raid for him instead.Arsenal could get a deal done on New Years Day if all parties can reach a swift agreement. About the authorPaul VegasShare the loveHave your saylast_img read more

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20 days agoGenoa coach Andreazzoli: We did not deserve defeat to AC Milan

first_imgGenoa coach Andreazzoli: We did not deserve defeat to AC Milanby Carlos Volcano20 days agoSend to a friendShare the loveGenoa coach Aurelio Andreazzoli felt they did not deserve defeat to AC Milan. Lasse Schone had Genoa ahead before Theo Hernandez and Franck Kessie struck for the visitors. Pepe Reina secured the points with an injury-time penalty save.Andreazzoli said, “It was an odd game. I complimented the lads at the end of the first half, as they played the game I expected. Then, in a couple of minutes we made some inconceivable naïve errors and threw it all away. You can’t afford that at this level.“After that, the team again did everything we had asked for, even more so, fighting with their hearts on their sleeves. There are regrets, clearly, as we play for a result and it hurts to emerge empty-handed from a match like that, but football is a combination of incidents and interpretations.“We played very well and it’s a pity for the lads, as they did not deserve the defeat. I do not protest at refereeing decisions. He went to view it on VAR, so he must know the decision he made.“Incidents went against us, Reina made up for his earlier error and saved them at the end. It was a game that deserved a different ending.” About the authorCarlos VolcanoShare the loveHave your saylast_img read more

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John Varvatos Announces StarStudded 14th Annual Stuart House Benefit Auction

first_imgJohn Varvatos and Charitybuzz are pleased to announce the 14th Annual Stuart House Benefit Auction hosted exclusively on Charitybuzz.com.The auction offers a unique collection of experiences to raise funds in support of Stuart House, a program of the Rape Treatment Center of Santa Monica-UCLA Medical Center, serving the needs of sexually abused children. 
“I’m thankful to our many friends who have been so generous donating these great experiences and supporting this important cause for so many years,” says John Varvatos. “And I am grateful to the team at Charitybuzz. We’re looking forward to raising significant funds to continue the great work happening at Stuart House.”The 14th Annual Stuart House Benefit Auction includes once-in-a-lifetime experiences like the chance to meet Linkin Park with two tickets to their August 14 show in Chicago, to take a photo with Bob Weir along with 2 tickets to a Dead & Company concert at Wrigley Field this summer, or gain special access to a pre-show VIP experience at a Zac Brown Band concert this year. Or one lucky bidder can shop ’til they drop with a $10,000 shopping spree with John Varvatos as their stylist, plus lunch and a 2-Night weekend stay at the Roxy Hotel in NYC. 
Other experiences and items in this auction include: • Meet Will Ferrell and Adam McKay behind the scenes at Funny or Die • Meet Shaun White with 2 VIP tickets to Air + Style • Two tickets to a taping of the return of Will & Grace • A special Breedlove acoustic guitar signed by the Dave Matthews Band • A Willie Nelson Signed Acoustic Guitar • Lunch with President of Lionsgate TV Group Sandra Stern • Meet music video director Grant Singer on the set of his next production“We are excited to host the 14th Annual Stuart House Benefit Auction with our good friend John Varvatos,” adds Ben Erwin, Senior Vice President of Business Development for Charity Network. “I know our bidders will be excited by the extraordinary items and experiences included in this auction and we are proud to continue our support of this important cause.”
Charitybuzz is proud to have raised more than $2.5M since 2012 for John Varvatos Stuart House through its auctions. The complete 14th Annual Stuart House Benefit Auction opens for bidding today June 13, 2017 at 10:00 AM EDT and will close Thursday, June 28, 2017 at 3:00 PM EDT at Charitybuzz.com/StuartHouse.last_img read more

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Piece of Charles Josephs totem pole in Montreal returned to museum following

first_imgThe missing hand off the Residential School Totem Pole in Montreal. Photo: Robbie Purdon/APTN.Lindsay RichardsonAPTN NewsAfter a few days fraught with tension, there’s a happy ending to the mystery of a missing wooden hand stolen from a commemorative totem pole outside of the Montreal Museum of Fine Arts.On Wednesday, a museum spokesperson confirmed that the hand from Kwakiutl artist Charles Joseph’s “Residential School Totem Pole” was deposited on the museum doorstep overnight, along with a letter of apology.The letter reportedly states “they regret the offence caused to everyone by their thoughtless gesture, and that they were unaware of the meaning of the totem pole represents,” according to a press release obtained by APTN News.Below is an excerpt of the letter received:“Firstly, we would like to apologize to all those who were offended. At the time, we were not in a sober state of mind, and we had no idea what the totem pole was … After we realized what this stood for and represented for so many people, we immediately felt sick to our stomach …“We would like to let all know that in NO WAY, SHAPE OR FORM was this done in spite … We were simply ignorant of what it symbolized, and have decided we 100% needed to return it. … We are sorry, so sorry for any pain and anger we have caused. Love for all people.”(Residential School Totem Pole lives in front of the Montreal Museum of Fine Arts downtown. Photo: Robbie Purdon/APTN)According to Director and Chief Curator Nathalie Bondil, the museum will be withdrawing their complaint based on the apology.“It is reassuring to observe the return of wisdom and clarity following an evening of inebriety,” Bondil said in a statement. “The letter of sincere apology that we received from the transient delinquents shows us that art educates and sensitizes us to all of the most important issues, notably our reconciliation with Indigenous peoples.”The totem pole has been a very public fixture outside the Michal and Renata Hornstein Pavilion on Sherbrooke St. for over two years.Over the weekend, the museum issued a multi-tier appeal for the hand’s return, after security camera footage revealed two hooded figures removing it before fleeing in the wee hours of Friday morning.Both the artist and owner are reportedly “very pleased with this conclusion.” The museum will be working to restore the piece to its original [email protected]@sentimtllast_img read more

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