England 23, Wales 19 – The English Verdict

first_imgLATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS It was a win, but it certainly wasn’t pretty – however, England boss Martin Johnson was happy enough with his team’s first World Cup warm-up match.“It was what we wanted,” he said. “We got far more out of that than the 60-pointers you occasionally get. We didn’t want to run through our moves and treat it as a training game. There were errors from both sides, but that’s the nature of the first game of the season.”Johnson was delighted with the performance of Jonny Wilkinson, who has played second fiddle to Toby Flood at No 10 in the last year. “It was great work from Jonny to get Manu Tuilagi into the game for the try. He handled the whole game well – but he doesn’t have to prove anything to me.” during the Investec international friendly match between England and Wales on August 6, 2011 in Twickenham, England. The manager also had praise for Tuilagi on his debut, the other two debutants, Mouritz Botha and Charlie Sharples, full-back Delon Armitage and Matt Stevens, who was playing his first Test since his drugs ban. Stevens himself was thrilled to be back. “It was incredible to walk out at Twickenham to a packed house, with the crowd going mad,” he said. “It was exactly like winning my first cap again. I was ecstatic to just come into Twickenham and drive up through the car park again.”England skipper Lewis Moody was brought off during the second half with a knee injury but said it was just a tweak and he was also pleased with his team’s performance. “For a first outing as an England side, that first half was pretty promising. We have got to build from there. There is plenty to work on, but it was a win and that’s the main thing.”last_img read more

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Wales v Australia – Five things we learnt

first_imgRearguard action: The Wallabies produced one of the great defensive performancesThe countless defensive sets demonstrated an incredibly well-organised defensive line which remained ‘connected’ even with two players or essentially six to eight metres of defensive width sitting in the bin. It was a remarkable statement from the Wallabies and one which continues to rebrand their position in test rugby. The Wallabies are no longer merely a dazzling backline with a lightweight pack and defensive fragilities, they’re the real deal. The Wallabies could win the whole damn thing. Epic battle: Wales and Australia contested a titanic encounter at Twickenham Over and out: Liam Williams added to Wales’ dire injury woesWales faced Australia with a backline which contained more awkward positional changes than even the most psychotic of yoga teachers could devise. Wales have been forced into selecting players who are uncomfortably out of position or, in some cases, desperately out of form. They are now finishing games like a local rugby club’s 2nd XV with three outside halves on the field and a scrum half on the wing. Some took to social media in the wake of the Wallabies defeat to demand more from the Welsh team and for supporters to stop making excuses for the squad when they fail. But that is very difficult to do when the Welsh team are still managing to perform despite their misfortune. This Welsh backline is enduring one of the cruellest runs of injury ever seen at a Rugby World Cup and for that they deserve some praise, not persecution.Charteris improves WalesLuke Charteris is becoming the WD40 of Welsh rugby – when he’s playing things creak less. Against Australia certain aspects of the Welsh game visibly improved through the inclusion of Charteris. His ability to wrap the Australian maul with his giant arms was massively effective and regularly forced the Wallabies to change their point of contact, when against other teams David Pocock would just sit at the back of the bus until it reaches its destination.Top man: Luke Charteris has emerged as a key player for WalesCharteris also had a huge impact on the Welsh lineout which had a completion of 89% – eight from nine. His inclusion against South Africa is a must. The likely combination of Eben Etzebeth and the massively impressive Lood de Jager mean that Wales must have a competitive lineout – as it is unlikely that they will have a competitive scrum.Military defence from the WallabiesThis is supposed to be an article about Wales, but the Wallabies’ defence during the period when they had just 13 men on the field was one of the finest, if not the finest, ten minutes of defensive organisation in the history of the Rugby World Cup. At times it didn’t even look like we were watching sport, it looked like ITV had switched the feed to a military documentary. LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALScenter_img Wales lost 15-6 to Australia in a tightly fought contest but despite struggling to break the Wallabies down, there were positives to take… It is possible to play well, and loseRugby is a notoriously complicated game. Yet with laws that sometimes require the use of IBM’s ‘Deep Blue’ computer to decode them, often, the outcomes of games are over simplified. Put simply if you won you played well, if you lost you played badly. But this isn’t always the case and is exactly what occurred when Wales were beaten 15-6 by Australia. Yes, Wales lost but despite the immediate post-match gloom it doesn’t mean they played badly and doesn’t mean they can’t beat South Africa. Wales dominated the bulk of the key performance indicators with 60% of the possession and 63% of the territory. They forced Australia in to making 123 tackles compared to Wales’ 69. Wales crossed Australia’s try line three times – admittedly where they failed to ground effectively. With Luke Charteris back in the starting XV, Wales managed to stem Australia’s highly impressive maul.Work hard: Wales made the Wallabies work extra hard at the tackleThe Welsh backrow competed effectively with arguably the best backrow in the tournament – and punished high carrying Australian body angles with as an effective demonstration of ‘choke tackling’ as you’ll see. The Welsh backs managed to shut down the Wallaby backline, keeping their carrying beneath a combined total of 180 metres – Israel Folau usually carries 130m, solo. There were of course a few downsides which can’t be ignored. The 15 minute period where Wales failed to score a single point against the 13-man Wallabies will have vexed Warren Gatland. Some may argue that Wales should have kicked their three pointers instead of opting for scrums and lineouts – but a two-man advantage is an evil temptress. Plus the Welsh scrum, after Saturday, has been reclassified from an Achilles Heel to an ‘Achilles Limb’. But whilst Wales may have lost, and there are enduring areas of concern, they were mightily competitive and the South African game will be no different.Wales need a new plan at the scrumThe Welsh scrum struggled hugely against the Wallabies, as it has done at every stage during this tournament. It had the appearance of a failed entry on the Great British Bake off – it looked okay when it came out of the oven, but after a couple of bites it collapsed into a mess. Admittedly, the Wallabies’ scrum is arguably the best in the competition and illustrates the almost Gandalf-like wizardry of Mario Ledesma, but this isn’t the first game in which the Welsh scrum has inhibited Wales’s game plan. And with all of the prop and hooker combinations tried, it may be that Wales simply have to scrummage with speed as the objective, not power.Learning zone: Wales’ scrum has been steadily improving all tournamentThere were numerous instances of Wales ‘locking out’ against the Wallabies, only for the secondary shove to make mess of the ball, or on some occasions leave it stranded in the middle of the scrum. It is testament to the amazing skillset of Talaupe Faletau that the Welsh scrum hasn’t been more costly for Wales. The quality of possession dribbling out from the Welsh scrum would make many number eights look like a drunk trying to pick up a kebab from the floor. Wales need a new plan to face South Africa, if the possession from the scrum can’t be solid, then it must be fast.Wales can legitimately start blaming injuries. Using injuries as an excuse is derided in rugby circles. But Wales have moved into the territory where it can be fully justified. This time the unfortunate individual is Liam Williams, who adds to a backline injury-list which already includes Rhys Webb, Scott Williams, Cory Allen, Jonathan Davies, Hallam Amos, Eli Walker, Leigh Halfpenny, and the impact on the squad will be huge. Williams is a versatile player and a key component in the Welsh backline – his defence, running angles, offloads and aerial work will be missed. William’s injury occurred relatively late in the game and as such can’t be blamed for the result against the Wallabies – but the continued and cruel dilution of the Welsh squad is becoming a very real problem in this World Cup.last_img read more

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France: Team of the season in the Top 14

first_imgLATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS The regular season is over in France with the Top 14 play-offs to come in a competition that goes on until the final at the Nou Camp, so which players have stood up over the season? French leave: Toby Flood excelled at Toulouse early on in the season 1. Lucas Pointud (Brive)The 28-year-old loosehead has been the form French prop in the Top 14 season, using his 6ft 2 and 19st frame to anchor the Brive scrum. His impact hasn’t gone unnoticed by Midi Olympique, who selected him six times in their weekly XV, though the French selectors keep ignoring Pointud’s credentials.2. Jody Jenneker (Oyonnax)/Arnaud Heguy (Grenoble)/Camille Chat (Racing 92/ Guillaume Ribes (Brive) /Bismarck Du Plessis (Montpellier)The one position in the XV where there was no outstanding player. Two veteran South African hookers in Du Plessis and Jenneker won a couple of Midi Olympique selections, as did two French stalwarts in Ribes and Heguy, while 20-year-old Racing hooker Camille Chat also appeared twice in his breakthrough season.The boss: Bismarch du Plessis’ performances for Montpellier helped them win silverware3. Uini Atonio (La Rochelle)New Zealand-born Atonio isn’t everyone’s idea of a modern tighthead prop, but the 23-stone La Rochelle giant is a consistent performer for his side. He was selected four times by Midi Olympique, just edging out France international rival Rabah Slimani who earned three nominations.4. Hendrik Roodt (Grenoble) and Rodrigo Capó Ortega (Castres)A South African and South American get a half each alongside Paul Willemse in the second row with both Roodt and Capó Ortega being nominated three times in Midi’s team of the week. The Uruguayan, now 35, has racked up more than 325 appearances in 14 seasons at Castres, while the 28-year-old Roodt is a formidable ball carrier for Grenoble.Power play: Montpellier’s South African lock Paul Willemse is a handful in the loose5. Paul Willemse (Montpellier)Surely the best uncapped lock in world rugby this season, the 23-year-old former Baby Bok has been immense in Jake White‘s Montpellier, starting all but four of their Top 14 matches. A mighty presence in the set-piece, Willemse has also scored seven tries this season in all competitions and earned six Midi Olympique selections.6. Juan Martín Fernández Lobbe (Toulon)He may be in his 35th year but Fernández Lobbe remains one of the most reliable and effective flankers in the world game. Despite missing the first three months of the Top 14 season because of the World Cup, the Argentine made four appearances in the Midi XVcenter_img Each Monday Midi Olympique prints its standout XV selected from the weekend’s Top 14 matches. It’s a bit of fun but also an indication – albeit subjective – of who’s hot and who’s not in the French championship. With the regular season now finished in France, the 26 team selections published by Midi can be pored over to produce a Team of the Season based on the most number of selections by a player in each position.Not surprisingly there are some famous faces in the Fantastic XV but there’s the odd surprise, and also one or two Frenchmen who despite producing consistent displays throughout the season have been overlooked by Guy Noves for this month’s tour to Argentina.15. Gaitan Germain (Brive)With 319 points this season, the 25-year-old Germain is the top scorer in the 2015-16 campaign, as he was in 2013-14 when his 299 points were superior to Jonny Wilkinson, James Hook and Jonathan Sexton. Selected in four Midi Olympique XVs, Germain still can’t get a sniff of a cap and was overlooked for the Argentina tour.Toulon’s Fijian winger Josua Tuisova celebrates after scoring a try against Montpellier14. Josua Tuisova (Toulon)The 22-year-old Fijian winger has taken the Top 14 by storm this season, combining pace and power with a wicked step and an eye for the try-line. His 11 tries may be three fewer than Montpellier’s Timoci Nagusa but his eight Midi Olympique selections are unrivalled this season.13. Gaël Fickou (Toulouse)Despite a season interrupted by World Cup and Six Nations duty, the 22-old Toulouse centre proved he’s regaining his confidence after the Philippe Saint-Andre era with four selections, enough to see off the challenge of veteran Racing 92 centre Henry Chavancy.12. Toby Flood (Toulouse)The former England threequarter had a superb start to the season, making five appearances in the first ten Midi Olympique XVs with four in the centre and one nomination at fly-half. Though his form slipped away in the second half of the season the 30-year-old Toulouse centre still makes the cut.11. Juan Imhoff (Racing 92)Imhoff didn’t appear for Racing until November because of World Cup commitments with Argentina, but the 28-year-old quickly slipped back into the groove. Other wings scored more tries but it’s Imhoff’s all-round contribution that earned him three appearances in the Midi Olympique XVs10. Jonathan Wisniewski (Grenoble) /Benjamín Urdapilleta (Castres)The 30-year-old Frenchman and Argentine Urdapilleta were each selected three times by Midi Olympique, no surprise given the consistency of their goal-kicking and the quality of their all-round game allied to sharp decision-making. Not that it did Wisniewski much good as he was passed over by Noves for the Argentina tour.Sniper: Sebastien Bezy’s quick service and work round the fringes earned him a France call-up9. Sébastien Bézy (Toulouse)Like Toulouse teammate Toby Flood, the 24-year-old scrum-half was on fire in the first half of the season, winning five selections in the Midi XVs. Then came a call-up to France’s Six Nations squad and that chastening experience in a struggling Bleus side clearly affected Bézy’s confidence and he hasn’t been nominated since the end of January. Old master: Toulon’s Juan Fernandez Lobbe has rolled back the years7. Wiaan Liebenberg (Montpellier)Captain of the Baby Boks when they won the U20 World Championship in 2012, Liebenberg arrived in Montpellier last year and has been a superb performer in the back-row, winning turnovers and making 251 tackles with a success rate of 96%. Nominated four times he gets the vote ahead of Toulouse’s Tala Gray.8. Rory Grice (Grenoble)One of the most astute overseas signings in the Top 14 in recent seasons, the former Waikato No8 arrived in Grenoble in 2014 and has dazzled with his athleticism and footballing skills. The 26-year-old Grice was selected four times by Midi Olympique, squeezing out Montpellier’s Alex Tulou and Duane Vermeulen of Toulon, who both earned three nominations.last_img read more

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The day I broke my neck: Robert Paylor on his catastrophic injury

first_imgCan’t get to the shops? You can download the digital edition of Rugby World straight to your tablet or subscribe to the print edition to get the magazine delivered to your door.Follow Rugby World on Facebook, Instagram and Twitter. Putting the pieces back together: Paylor’s shirt (Robert Paylor) He can remember a time when he was staring at his toes, willing them to wiggle, almost reminiscent of that scene in Kill Bill. He would then take tentative first steps in a harness. He later walked the hallway. He kept checking boxes – with the help of his support system – and now he wants to turn 200 yards into 500, into something further.He wants to keep clocking up the reps. The image above of the team uniform that medics cut off him, pieced back together, is a fitting metaphor.It is worth pointing out that not everyone who suffers a serious injury can recover faculties lost to them and if that is the case it is not for a lack of effort or determination.Paylor adds: “There are some people that don’t get that, that aren’t that lucky. I’m lucky. What still got put in is the work.”“I forgive him, whether he’s sorry or not”After an interminable wait, a review was conducted by US rugby authorities into the incident in that final. But no blame was apportioned, no sanctions, no slaps on the wrist. According to Paylor, no one from the Arkansas side who were involved  in the incident ever made an effort to apologise to him or even accept they contributed to his catastrophic injury. It would have meant a lot to him.“I forgive him, whether he’s sorry or not,” Paylor reflects of the player who took him down. “For all those feelings of animosity, of looking behind my shoulder and looking back on the moment… I am focusing on my rehab, focusing on getting better, you know, the good things in my life. That’s what’s helped me. Because as you fast-forward through this story, so much happened on those first couple of days.“But so much more is happening since then. And being able to return back to UC Berkeley and graduate and while I’m doing that, I continue to rehab out of paralysis. To now where I can stand up in my walker on my own and walk if it’s within 200 yards.”Related: Jim Stewart on recovering from a dislocated neckAnother upshot of this is that the former second-row knows what will come next: full-time motivational speaking.There were touching moments where the PAC-12 collegiate athletic conference gave his story coverage or the emotional day, ten months after the accident, when he attended his first match back at Berkeley and broke down in tears during the American national anthem. But he now wants to create special moments for others, using his story.It all started with being asked to give a speech at his university. Then with the help of Cal rugby coach Jack Clark, he began beefing up his presentation. After doing internships with Intel, he gave them a talk. Seeing people laughing, crying, reacting to his words was powerful. He was hooked. There are incremental goals here too: he plans to deliver 50 speeches and reassess. He embraces where he is, adding: “This injury, it gave me a story.”Helping out: Cal coach Jack Clark (Getty Images)So how does he feel about rugby today?He quickly replies: “If somebody asked me, ‘Robert, would you play rugby again, if you could go back and do it again?’ The answer is yes, absolutely.“It’s the best decision I’ve ever made. I’ve developed lifelong relationships. It’s taught me so many lessons, how to be a resilient person, a tough person, how to be a good person. The culture of rugby is so incredible, even across team lines, I just couldn’t trade it in for anything. I would recommend that anybody play rugby.“Obviously, it’s important the world learns its lesson and I hope anyone who sees my story knows that these rules are here for a reason. And you can be a really physical player within the laws of the game. But if you go out here and break these something can happen, like what happened to Robert Paylor. It’s our duty to each other, to protect each other in that way.“But absolutely I love the game. And if I could go back, if I woke up in the day 6 May 2017, the day I broke my neck, I would still go out there and play.”No matter how far he travels, the next steps for Robert Paylor are huge. “I started going down and you know, since my head is down into my chest, once I hit the ground my face just slammed against my chest.“I felt this crunch in my neck. And then it was just poof everywhere on my body below my neck, I could not feel it. I could not move it. It’s that feeling when you wake up and your arm’s just totally gone asleep because it was hanging over the couch or something? It was that but everywhere and worse. I mean, I’m just lying there and I’m screaming.“I’d broken plenty of bones before – wrists, nose, whatever – playing football and rugby growing up. I was like, ‘Man, I felt it in my neck.’ I just broke my neck. I was completely certain that I’d done it. And I had seen these stories before, in news articles, you see them on TV and someone breaks their neck, and they don’t move or feel anything again for the rest of their life. And I’m thinking, ‘This is gonna be me’. You know, I’m not gonna graduate. I’m not gonna have a family.”Paylor says that he thought the worst, instantly. If you watch footage of the incident you can see team-mates signal for help – they know something is wrong. But they are metres out from a try in a major final and the referee has not halted play. Paylor says he was screaming, but his diaphragm was also partially paralysed at that moment.Team medics knew instantly they had a major issue on their hands, with Paylor unable to feel anything or squeeze his hand.At the hospital, he was delivered some stark news. As he recollects, the doctor told him that he had a spinal cord injury at the C5 and C6 and that it was “really bad”. He says he was told he would never walk again, never move his hands again. He needed emergency spinal fusion surgery and, by the way, it’s life threatening.That winning feeling: The Cal rugby team in 2017 (Getty Images)The surgery was a success and Paylor is full of praise for his carers, yet the initial diagnosis is something that spurs him on.Rehab is tortuous work and the issue of exorbitant cost of healthcare quickly crept in. He contracted pneumonia while in care and, unable to cough, relied on nurses and respiratory therapists to help him clear the fluid in his lungs every three hours.However, the business administration student says with all the knocks and painful talk he felt it was “just static – I was immediately very determined that I wasn’t going to accept this as my permanent reality”. He was also helped out by his best friend’s mum setting up a GoFundMe page.Today Paylor has the use of his hands, he can stand up out of a chair and into his walker, unaided. He can walk 200 yards. He is setting incremental goals for himself every day. The ultimate aim is to never need his wheelchair again. LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALScenter_img I stood up out of my bed and into my walker today. This is a huge step towards me being able to walk around my house on my own. Getting that much closer to saying goodbye to my wheelchair! pic.twitter.com/4Gn1yCcLxp— Robert Paylor (@RobertPaylor5) March 19, 2020 It is two days before his final exams, at a time of unprecedented global unease, yet Robert Paylor is calmness personified. Then again, the UC Berkeley student’s collegiate experience has been vastly different to your average kid.“We’re going in for this National Championship versus Arkansas State and I think, ‘Yeah, this one’s in the bag – we got these guys’,” the former Cal lock tells us over Skype, recalling the fateful day in 2017 when everything changed.“This is kind of the big time in American rugby, you’re in the collegiate National Championship. And it was about just a minute into the game. They committed a penalty, so we kicked it into touch. We’re like six metres out. It’s obviously a mauling situation and we had a very effective maul. If we were within ten metres, it was going in.“I’m kind of one of these big guys, so I’m lifting in this lineout, then get to my position and we’re driving right away. The opposing team immediately start committing penalties. Three guys are coming from the side. He’s got me bound by the leg, which everyone does and it usually doesn’t get called but it’s illegal, a penalty.“Then this one player (grabs) me around the neck. So my chin is pinned to my chest, and I’m driving this thing, standing up a little just because there’s this battle going on and it’s like blood in the water because we’re four metres out. So I dip my shoulder level back down to get parallel. The ref’s not calling (any infringements) and I don’t even think we were playing any advantage at that point. Then this other guy came in and chops me down by the legs. In 2017 the student was severely injured in America’s National Championship final. Here’s what has happened since…last_img read more

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Continúa el trabajo de la Iglesia Episcopal en Haití

first_img The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Press Release Service Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Rector Collierville, TN Rector Bath, NC Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Virtual Episcopal Latino Ministry Competency Course Online Course Aug. 9-13 In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Rector Pittsburgh, PA An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Cathedral Dean Boise, ID The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 @ 7 p.m. ET New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs Associate Rector Columbus, GA Youth Minister Lorton, VA Submit a Job Listing Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Rector Knoxville, TN Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Featured Jobs & Calls Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET [Oficial de Asuntos Públicos] A casi apenas unos meses de la conmemoración del tercer aniversario del devastador terremoto el cual destruyó Haití, la Iglesia Episcopal continúa su énfasis ayudando a la diócesis más grande y de crecimiento más rápido.“Es un gran regalo y privilegio para nosotros poder trabajar con la gente de Haití”, comentó el Obispo y representante principal de la Iglesia Episcopal Stacy Sauls. “Yo nunca falle en ser inspirado por ellos y por su sentido indómito de esperanza. Los problemas y asuntos que enfrenta Haití definitivamente devastarían a muchos. Sin embargo, la gente de Haití continua enfrentando los retos con fe y fuerza espiritual la cual hace un llamado a todos nosotros para que respondamos de la misma manera”.El terremoto del 12 enero del 2010 destruyó gran parte de la Isla Caribeña y ocasionó muchas muertes. Ese terremoto arrasó con iglesias y establecimientos del diocesano, incluyendo la Catedral de la Santísima Trinidad con sus murales invalorables en la capital de la ciudad de Puerto Príncipe [Port-au-Prince].La Convención General del 2012 nombró el enfoque de esfuerzo para la Diócesis de Haití como una de las prioridades de la Iglesia.La recientemente organizada Oficina de Desarrollo de la Iglesia Episcopal está coordinando todos los esfuerzos de recaudación de fondos para reconstruir  la diócesis de Haití. Esta sigue la finalización de la primera fase del proyecto de la Fundación de la Iglesia Episcopal.“Agradecemos a la Fundación de la Iglesia Episcopal por su campaña fundamental”, dijo el Obispo Sauls.  “Se ha pasado el bastón a la Oficina de Desarrollo, la cual ha mantenido una reunión habitual con la diócesis sobre cómo y dónde se puede ayudar, viendo la amplia variedad de necesidad de infraestructura”.Con ese fin, un equipo de la Iglesia Episcopal visitará Haití para participar con los líderes y representantes del diocesano.  “Este viaje de misión incluirá una evaluación cuidadosa y una investigación de hechos para determinar qué pasos se deben tomar a corto y largo período en todo lo que abarca este proyecto”, dijo el Obispo Sauls.Actualmente el Obispo Sauls y su personal están trabajando arduamente en un acuerdo final con un arquitecto para un complejo de la catedral. Él está planeando dirigir una peregrinación en Haití a comienzos del 2013.Y, en otra faceta del  trabajo de la Iglesia con Haití, la Iglesia Central es ahora la casa en un acuerdo de alquiler con el Consulado General de la República de Haití y de la Misión Permanente Haitiana a las Naciones Unidas.Para obtener información sobre cómo las personas, congregaciones, diócesis y grupos pueden ayudar a reconstruir Haití, comuníquese con Kim Moore en [email protected] informarse más:  http://www.episcopalchurch.org/page/rebuild-our-church-haiticenter_img Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Rector Martinsville, VA Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Rector Shreveport, LA Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Rector Tampa, FL Rector Washington, DC Featured Events Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Continúa el trabajo de la Iglesia Episcopal en Haití Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Submit a Press Release Rector Belleville, IL Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Submit an Event Listing Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Director of Music Morristown, NJ Rector Albany, NY Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Curate Diocese of Nebraska Posted Oct 2, 2012 Rector Hopkinsville, KY Rector Smithfield, NC Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI last_img read more

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Prayers urged for the Democratic Republic of Congo

first_img Rector Albany, NY Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Orphans at Action Salutaire pour Development Integrale/Goma, a church-led NGO, with Presiding Bishop Katharine Jefferts Schori during her July 2011 visit to the Anglican Church of the Congo. Photo/Matthew Davies[Episcopal News Service] Presiding Bishop Katharine Jefferts Schori has joined fellow Christians throughout the world in calling for a week of prayer Nov. 26-Dec. 2 for the Democratic Republic of Congo.“Pray for an end to the conflict, an end to violence and the atrocities, that the needs of the suffering may be supplied, and that peace may prevail,” Jefferts Schori said in a Nov. 19 call to action, issued by the Episcopal Church’s public affairs office.The week of prayer has been organized by the Church Mission Society and the Congo Church Association, with the support of Archbishop Henri Isingoma of the Anglican Church of Congo, in response to a recent increase in violence promulgated by a new rebel group, M23, and several existing ones.Prayers and resources may be downloaded here.“Our fellow Anglicans in the Democratic Republic of Congo continue to experience violence and displacement,” Jefferts Schori said, noting that the rise in violence since April has caused the displacement of 320,000 within Congo, and 60,000 into Uganda and Rwanda.The Anglican presence in Congo was established by Ugandan evangelist Apolo Kivebulaya in 1896. Today, the province includes about half a million Anglicans under the leadership of Isingoma, primate since 2009.“The work of the Anglican Church in Congo continues to be of the highest quality and responsiveness, rooted in the love of Christian for neighbor,” said Jefferts Schori, who visited Eastern Congo in July 2011 and witnessed firsthand “evidence of the work done by Mothers’ Union and other groups on behalf of the least of these – women, children, and orphans, all victims of the violence of war.”ENS coverage of the presiding bishop’s July 2011 trip is available here.[ooyala code=”1oZjN1MjrVdkTHOcuX8ni4nZv5XD935f”]The Democratic Republic of the Congo, a former Belgian colony, has buckled in the hands of corrupt and power-hungry leaders since its independence in 1960. The vast country – about the same size as the continent of Europe – faced more than three decades of “Africanization” and gross corruption under the presidency of Joseph Mobutu, who was supported by the United States as a “friendly tyrant” for his resistance to the Soviet Union. Rebels led by Laurent Kabila overthrew Mobutu in 1997.Mealtime for the children at a Diocese of North Kivu orphanage. Photo/Matthew DaviesInitially raising hopes for better times, Kabila was installed as the new president and changed the country’s name from Zaire to the Democratic Republic of the Congo. But his allies became enemies, and Congo entered five years of brutal war in which about 5.4 million people are believed to have perished. When he was assassinated in 2001, Kabila was succeeded by his son, Joseph Kabila, who remains Congo’s president in a power-sharing government that includes former rebels.The war was fueled largely by a scramble for the country’s vast mineral resources. Rebels in the east, supported by Tutsi militias and neighboring countries Uganda and Rwanda, battled the Kinshasa-based government, backed by Hutu militias and Angola, Namibia and Zimbabwe. In October 2004, the human rights group Amnesty International announced that 40,000 cases of rape had been reported over the previous six years.Women who’ve been sexually abused by soldiers find a safe haven at a Diocese of North Kivu facility, where they work through their trauma and carve out a new life with the end goal being their integration back into society. Photo/Matthew DaviesAs Congo – which hosts the United Nations’ largest peacekeeping team – attempts to recover from what has been dubbed the bloodiest conflict since World War II, rebel activity still roils the east of the country and is synonymous with gender-based violence, particularly in rural villages. Some reports reveal stories of rebel soldiers raping women while their husbands are forced to watch, then killing family members and carrying out acts of cannibalism.“Many thousands are living with fear and insecurity, hunger, sickness, and poverty, while they yearn to return home and live in peace,” Jefferts Schori said in her Nov.  19 call to action.The Mothers’ Union, an international Christian charity that seeks to support families worldwide, plays an important role in taking care of women traumatized through sexual violence.The United Women for Peace and Social Promotion (Union des Femmes pour la Paix et la Promotion Social – UFPPS), founded in Katanga in 2003, has built on the work of the Mothers’ Union to promote and facilitate women’s engagement as messengers of peace and leaders of social and economic development in their communities.The Episcopal Church, through its former women’s ministries office and Episcopal Relief & Development, has supported UFPPS’s work in medical and psychological healing and social reintegration in the Katanga and Boga dioceses.Referring to the week of prayer, Jefferts Schori said: “I can think of no better way for the Christian world to prepare for the Advent of the Prince of Peace, and I hope and pray that you will join me in praying during the week leading up to Advent.”The call for prayer on the CMS website said: “We hope individuals, groups and churches will commit to pray afresh for a resolution and definitive end to the conflict, violence and atrocities, and for a new era of peace, as well as for the needs of all those affected.”— Matthew Davies is an editor and reporter for the Episcopal News Service. Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Presiding Bishop Katharine Jefferts Schori Submit an Event Listing Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector Tampa, FL TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Rector Knoxville, TN An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 @ 7 p.m. ET Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Africa, In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Rector Martinsville, VA Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Rector Bath, NC Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Curate Diocese of Nebraska Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Rector Smithfield, NC The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Tags The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Comments are closed. Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs Press Release Service Featured Jobs & Calls Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Prayers urged for the Democratic Republic of Congo An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Rector Belleville, IL Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Submit a Press Release June 23, 2013 at 12:01 am I hope the situations for DR Congo and Congo gets better.This has nothing to do with the situation in DR Congo and Congo, but I have a suggestion if the two are actual separate countries (it is hard to tell for sure) Congo could be names West Congo, or/and DR Congo could be East Congo. It is just a suggestion. Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Rector Shreveport, LA Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Rector Hopkinsville, KY Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Jane Sgems says: Director of Music Morristown, NJ Advocacy Peace & Justice, Rector Collierville, TN Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Featured Events Submit a Job Listing By Matthew DaviesPosted Nov 19, 2012 Rector Pittsburgh, PA Comments (1) Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Rector Washington, DC Associate Rector Columbus, GA Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Anglican Communion, Virtual Episcopal Latino Ministry Competency Course Online Course Aug. 9-13 Youth Minister Lorton, VA last_img read more

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Justifying the call

first_img [Episcopal News Service] A number of years ago I helped plan a church event that despite our best efforts attracted only a handful of people. Afterwards one of the other organizers consoled me by saying: “Remember, Jesus said feed my sheep, not count my sheep.”That’s surely a wise statement, for we should focus on individuals, not statistics. But we do keep count, don’t we, both in our local parishes and in the national church? And there’s no denying that over the past 50 years, the Episcopal Church has had a steadily declining number of people in its pews.During the Episcopal General Convention in July, New York Times columnist Ross Douthat wrote a piece asking “Can Liberal Christianity Be Saved?” His thought-provoking essay led me to his book Bad Religion: How We Became a Nation of Heretics. The book is meant to generate debate on both the left and the right, for no matter what your denominational or political leanings, there’s something to offend everybody in his critique.Of liberal-leaning churches like ours, Douthat writes, “[They have] burned their candle at both ends, losing their more dogmatic parishioners to more fervent congregations and their doubters to the lure of sleeping in on Sundays. Any institution that calls human beings to devotion and self-sacrifice needs to justify that call.”That last sentence gets to the heart of our problem, I think. What is it that justifies the call to our church? What makes us different than a social club, a political party, or a service organization? What feeds our spirits, draws us out of our comfort zones, and challenges us to be better people? Where is the transcendent in our church?I thought of Douthat’s critique when I spoke to an Episcopalian recently who told me how she’d grown up in a conservative denomination, one that she was happy to have left behind forever. “The thing I like about the Episcopal Church,” she said, “is that you can believe and do whatever you want.”Jesus tending (but not counting) his flock. Photo/Lori EricksonIn one sense, of course, her statement is right. The Episcopal Church respects individual conscience. We value the importance of questioning, debate, and skepticism. But her comment also made me wince. If we take our Christian faith seriously, we can’t believe or do anything we want. The church is not a cafeteria buffet line.Located in a left-leaning university town, my home church loses few parishioners to more conservative denominations. But we have toomany who simply drift away because there’s not enough to anchor them in our church. I must admit that on some Sundays I envy them their leisurely mornings spent with a stack of newspapers and cups of coffee. Their spiritual-but-not-religious orientation looks mighty inviting: listening to NPR’s “On Being” with Krista Tippett and reading the occasional book on spiritual topics, they don’t have to deal with the messy and often-frustrating aspects of parish life.Given this, it’s not surprising that one of the fastest growing categories in surveys of American religious belief is the “nones”—people unaffiliated with any organized religion. A religious studies professor who spoke at our church last year put the problem this way: the biggest challenge facing the Episcopal Church, he said, is to keep people from “thinking their way out the door.”We want to keep people thinking, certainly, but we also need to realize that rationality alone is an arid and lonely path. And I think we need to resist the urge to accept our declining numbers, dismissing those who have fallen away by saying that they weren’t the right kind of Episcopalians anyway. We need to pay more attention to thoughtful outside commentators like Douthat as well as those within our church offering critiques from both ends of the political and theological spectra.I speak as one who came relatively late to the Episcopal Church. I came back to Christianity after a long time away because I was drawn to the traditions, liturgies, and intellectual challenges of Anglicanism. I respect its mysteries and paradoxes and its commitment to social justice. I don’t want this church to become a kind of boutique denomination:  small, exclusive, self-congratulatory, and increasingly irrelevant. — Lori Erickson writes about inner and outer journeys at http://www.spiritualtravels.info/.  She serves as a deacon at Trinity Episcopal Church in Iowa City, Iowa.  Justifying the call Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL By Lori EricksonPosted Dec 19, 2012 Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 @ 7 p.m. ET Submit a Press Release AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Comments are closed. Rector Tampa, FL Rector Smithfield, NC Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector Pittsburgh, PA An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET December 19, 2012 at 8:55 pm I’m also late to the Episcopal Church. Our parish is doing well with new parisoners. Things are changing in other ways that hurt my heart. Very few advent hymns from the hymnal, Christmas carol singing before Christmas, no Lessons and Carols, the greening of the church before the last Sunday in Advent all change the way I have learned to Advent. I’m in an Episcopal Church because of the liturgy and following the church year has become part of my piety and leads me on my spiritual journey. I don’t want these changes and I feel like a voice crying in the wilderness. The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Featured Jobs & Calls Rector Shreveport, LA Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI December 20, 2012 at 2:12 pm I’m with you, Diane. Our Church has a magnificent opportunity to practice Christian formation if we would only do so and stop accomodating the culture. For some reason there are parish leaders who believe that Christian faith and practice occur by breathing the air or by osmosis. The hard work of enculturating people to Christian literacy is given up on too quickly; whether it be greening up and caroling with the Mall or offering communion to anybody who is curious so as to not challenge anyone’s egos. We have canons related to our worship and education life that should be followed with as much regularity and vigor as the canons dealing with stuff in the church. Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Submit a Job Listing Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Doug Desper says: Diane Lantz says: Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Rector Albany, NY center_img Virtual Episcopal Latino Ministry Competency Course Online Course Aug. 9-13 Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Comments (2) Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Curate Diocese of Nebraska Director of Music Morristown, NJ Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Rector Martinsville, VA This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Press Release Service Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Rector Washington, DC Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Associate Rector Columbus, GA Featured Events Submit an Event Listing Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Youth Minister Lorton, VA Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Rector Belleville, IL Rector Collierville, TN Rector Knoxville, TN Rector Bath, NC Rector Hopkinsville, KY last_img read more

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‘Pilgrimage of trust,’ Taizé Community come to Pine Ridge Reservation

first_img‘Pilgrimage of trust,’ Taizé Community come to Pine Ridge Reservation Taizé brothers, South Dakota organizers welcome 600 pilgrims to weekend of prayer Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Cordelia Biddle says: Comments are closed. Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS By Mary Frances SchjonbergPosted May 28, 2013 Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Youth Minister Lorton, VA Submit a Press Release An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 @ 7 p.m. ET Tags Rector Shreveport, LA Mary Frances Schjonberg says: Daphne Messersmith says: May 29, 2013 at 8:59 am What a powerful witness and rich experience! I am wondering how one would have heard about such an opportunity. Many I know would be interested in participating in events like this but we are not “in the network”! Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH May 28, 2013 at 6:42 pm Some of use in the Diocese of Delaware and St. Thomas’s Church in Newark knew Tyson and Tyrone when they were just little guys running around in our VBS centers at St. John’s in Eagle Butte. So proud of the men they have become.What an experience for all who attended. Thank you for the opportunity. Patricia Neal Jensen says: May 29, 2013 at 8:36 am Thank you for this wonderful exposure to an extraordinary event. I’m currently writing a biography of St. Katharine Drexel, a relative. Her work at Pine Ridge and dedication to the nation’s “forgotten” people crosses time and religious boundaries. As an Episcopalian in urban Philadelphia, I send my gratitude to all who organized, participated and bore witness to God’s love in the hallowed space of Pine Ridge. Virtual Episcopal Latino Ministry Competency Course Online Course Aug. 9-13 Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem May 30, 2013 at 9:40 pm Thank you Mary Frances for bringing us back to the Source – now but a memory, one of astonishing hope – a weekend more beautiful that words can express, and yet, your words, Mary Frances, shed light on the beauty of what we lived. Thank you. Margaret Sally Price says: Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Featured Events Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Rector Tampa, FL May 30, 2013 at 4:12 pm If you are speaking about going to Taize, check out the information herehttp://www.taize.fr/en_rubrique9.html Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Rector Washington, DC New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Rector Bath, NC Betsy Payne Rosen says: May 28, 2013 at 6:15 pm My wife and I, being in our mid to late 50s, were fortunate to attend with a group of young people from our home town. The experience was trans-formative. That is the only way I can describe it. Truly trans-formative. Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Rector Knoxville, TN Featured Jobs & Calls In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest center_img Margaret O’Donnell says: Rector Pittsburgh, PA Associate Rector Columbus, GA Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL May 28, 2013 at 5:48 pm Thanks for the great report Mary Frances. This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Rector Martinsville, VA May 29, 2013 at 10:11 pm How wonderful this all sounds! I feel certain that everyone who was part of this experience will bring new life and hope to the communities they return to. My favorite quote? ““Actually trying to build the kingdom in and with the churches is a kind of act of resistance within our mainstream culture and a really, really important thing to do,” she [The Rev. Rita Powell] said.” This story is the best news I’ve heard about the church in years. Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Curt Jopling says: Rector Belleville, IL Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Press Release Service Rector Hopkinsville, KY Submit an Event Listing Submit a Job Listing Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector Albany, NY During the May 24-27 Taizé “pilgrimage of trust on earth” held on the Pine Ridge Indian Reservation in southwestern South Dakota, pilgrims gather in the morning, at noon and again in the evening to pray in a natural amphitheater worship space below Christ Episcopal Church in Red Shirt Table. They sit facing icons and a cross against the backdrop of the Badlands to the east. Photo: Mary Frances Schjonberg/Episcopal News Service[Episcopal News Service – Red Shirt Table, South Dakota] Pilgrims from all over the world came May 24-27 to a hot and dusty stretch of Pine Ridge Indian Reservation prairie land bounded by the Black Hills and the Badlands to learn about and practice trust and reconciliation, overcome stereotypes, form friendships and grow in faith.They did so while singing Taizé music with Western Meadowlark harmonies and the beat of crickets.And they did so without showers or electricity and while trying to avoid plopping down on a cactus, stepping in a cow pie or encountering a rattlesnake.Thus, the simple communal life of the Taizé Community of France came to this part of the Pine Ridge, which exists in one of the least developed parts of the United States and includes Shannon County, one of the poorest counties in the country.Brother Alois, the abbot of the Taizé Community in France, leads worshippers out of the natural amphitheater worship spaces after Morning Prayer on May 25, which began the first full day of the May 24-27 Taizé “pilgrimage of trust on earth” held on the Pine Ridge Indian Reservation in southwestern South Dakota. Photo: Mary Frances Schjonberg/Episcopal News Service“I hope that their hearts will be touched,” Brother Alois, the Taizé Community’s abbot, said about the pilgrims during an interview at the beginning of the pilgrimage, “and that Christ touches our hearts to awaken within us the will for reconciliation.”Or, as volunteer Mikayla Dunfee told a newly arrived group of pilgrims during their orientation May 24: “Just keep your hearts open; this is going to be a wild ride.”The May 24-27 gathering was first Taizé pilgrimage on an Indian reservation and it was by far the most remote of the locations that have been part of the Taizé brothers’ “pilgrimage of trust on earth,” which they describe as a meeting with Christ and with others.Brother Emile, during an interview amidst the bustle of nearly 600 arriving pilgrims, said that the setting was much like the rural, isolated nature of Taizé in the French countryside but, “of course, the Badlands is more spectacular.”The Pine Ridge has a reputation for being a stark place, and not just because of its stark physical setting but for its history of subjugation and suffering. Yet, the brothers and the South Dakota young adults who envisioned the potential power of such a gathering were drawn by the beauty and strength they perceived here.Without ignoring the suffering, Brother Emile said, “we wanted also to be attentive to the beauty that is here,” both in the geography and in people’s hearts.“When we go somewhere we look for signs of hope; not to be blind to the suffering, but to look for signs of hope,” he said.What they found, he said, were “people who have been resilient, who are founded deep in their faith and it makes them stand up on their feet and want to be there for others.”“The church exists through people like that,” he added.Mikayla Dunfee, a volunteer organizer of the May 24-27 Taizé “pilgrimage of trust on earth” on the Pine Ridge Indian Reservation in southwestern South Dakota, uses a map May 24 to orient a new group of pilgrims to the lay of the land at Red Shirt Table. Dunfee is just ending a time living in an intentional community on the Rosebud Reservation and heads to Berkeley Divinity School at Yale in the fall. Photo: Mary Frances Schjonberg/Episcopal News ServiceThe brothers say the Pine Ridge gathering is important because, while people from outside North America often have a romantic image of the Native American peoples drawn from films and novels, there is another story, one of unremitting poverty, violence, and despair. The brothers were told more than once that the negative perceptions of the reservation and the people who live there alters the residents’ perception of themselves, Brother Emile said.The statistics are stark and stunning: the unemployment rate is 80 percent and 49 percent of reservation residents live below the federal poverty line (61 percent of those 18 years or younger live below that poverty line); average life expectancy on the reservation is estimated to be 48 years for men and 52 years for women compared with a U.S. combined average of 77.5 years; one in four babies are born with either fetal alcohol syndrome or fetal alcohol spectrum disorder and infant mortality is 300 percent higher than in the rest of America; teen suicide is 150 percent higher than the U.S. average; 50 percent of adults 40 years and older have diabetes and tuberculosis rates are 800 percent higher than in the rest of the country; approximately 58 percent of grandparents on the reservation are raising their grandchildren.Yet, in the midst of stereotypes is another reality of the Pine Ridge, the brothers say.Indeed, during a discussion amongst the pilgrims and the brothers on the gathering’s last morning, Shane LeClair, a senior at Augustana College in Sioux Falls, South Dakota from White Bear Lake, Minnesota, said, “From the outside, a lot of us come in with hearing stories about the reservation and of this land and that there are people who lacked hope and are in need of a reason to hope and to have faith.”“And what I know I have experienced and several people in my group have experienced is [that] it’s the exact opposite. There is no lack of hope in this land; there is no lack of faith. I think that all of us leave here with a lot of hope that this community and this land has provided us.”LeClair thanked the Lakota hosts for “allowing us to be here and to share in this with you.”Brother Alois said in the brothers’ invitation to the gathering that “we want to listen carefully to the story of the Lakota people, and listen together to what the Spirit is saying to us all in our attempt to create a world of solidarity and peace. Only by coming together beyond our differences in a climate of prayer and sharing can we find new ways forward.”Taizé Brother Stephen sounds the bell to call pilgrims to Morning Prayer May 25 during the May 24-27 Taizé “pilgrimage of trust on earth” at Red Shirt Table, South Dakota. He’s standing on the fence outside the small Christ Episcopal Church parish hall. Photo: Mary Frances Schjonberg/Episcopal News ServiceThe pilgrimage’s rootsThe impetus to come to the Pine Ridge began in 2009, when a group of South Dakota university students, including Tyson and Tyrone White of the Cheyenne River Indian Reservation in South Dakota, came to Taizé. According to the order, this was one of the very first times when the community welcomed Native Americans to take part in the international meetings on what is know as “the hill.”Taizé’s focus on reconciliation and justice resonated with the young Lakota men. The encounter was “very beautiful for us,” Brother Alois said, “because it linked us with a reality that was far away from us in Taizé. The reality of Native American people is something that we thought we had to put more attention towards.”Discussions led to an invitation to Brother John to visit South Dakota. He came in 2010 and again in 2011, at the invitation of the group, and stopped at the Pine Ridge Reservation and got to know the Two Bulls family at Red Shirt Table.The Two Bulls family eventually offered the land around the small Episcopal Christ Episcopal Church, two miles south of Red Shirt Village, for the Taizé pilgrims to pitch their tents and pray. The Rev. Robert Two Bulls Sr. has been the priest at the church, which has been his family’s church for generations. He is the father of another Episcopal priest of the same name who is based in Minneapolis.The Rev. Rita Powell, who is the vicar of St. Paul’s Episcopal Church in Vermillion, South Dakota and coordinator for youth and young adult ministry for the Diocese of South Dakota, led that first group of students to Taizé. She had spent several months previously as a volunteer at Taizé after learning about the Taizé experience from a youth group she helped at St. Mark’s Episcopal Church in New Canaan, Connecticut.“They made their parents send them to Taizé every year – every year,” she recalled. The teenagers told her they were surprised when they realized it was the silence at Taizé that attracted them.“I thought Taizé was some kind of hippy, unstructured church,” Powell said but, when she went with the youth group and experienced it for herself, she realized that the brothers were very orthodox. “I mean they’re monks who sing about Jesus in Latin three times a day.”“They found a way to be both very authentic to the tradition and somehow very fresh,” she said, adding she began to believe that Taizé’s attitude complemented that of the Episcopal Church “because our church is a church that cares about liturgy and tradition, and we think it might be possible for the social-activist work to happen in the prayer,” as does Taizé.The monks’ vision of reconciliation is “exquisite,” Powell said, explaining that Taizé answers the question of how people can find common ground by asking, “why don’t you sit on the same ground” and live and pray together.And, Powell said, the brothers do not serve clients. Instead, they ask people – especially young people – to come and help them build the kingdom of God now.“It’s not so much that young people have needs to be met by the church, as the church has needs that young people can meet,” she said.The brothers encourage pilgrims to live out what they have grasped of the Gospel during their experience at Taizé; and to do this, according to the community’s website, “with an increased awareness of the life that dwells within them and of the practical gestures of solidarity they can put into practice in their own immediate environment … while remaining in touch with the reality of the local church.”During a retreat, Powell said she had what she reluctantly calls “a vision” that people in the United States needed Taizé’s “energy and wisdom” in a way that went beyond simply using the community’s music. And she began to believe that “a friendship could happen” between the brothers and the Lakota people.“Christ brings us together from all nations, from all backgrounds, so we found it very beautiful that we could be in community with them,” Brother Alois said. And, besides, “they invited us to come here, so we came.”Powell said she hoped people would leave Red Shirt Table “feeling empowered to, as [Taizé’s founder] Brother Roger once said, to not run away from challenges but to run toward them.”“Actually trying to build the kingdom in and with the churches is a kind of act of resistance within our mainstream culture and a really, really important thing to do,” she said.(Powell is leaving South Dakota this summer to return to the East Coast where she grew up. She has accepted a call to be the assistant rector for congregational development at Trinity Copley Square in Boston, and begins work there July 15.)Close to 600 pilgrims, mostly aged 18 to 35, came to the Taizé “pilgrimage of trust on earth” on the prairie at Red Shirt Table, South Dakota in the Pine Ridge Sioux Reservation. They pitched their modern-day tents around some more traditional ones. Photo: Mary Frances Schjonberg/Episcopal News ServicePaul Daniels, an Episcopal Service Corps volunteer in Boston from St. Ambrose Episcopal Church in Raleigh, North Carolina, said Pine Ridge was his first Taizé event and during it he found common ground between the story of his African-American heritage and the story of the Lakota people.“I believe God wants us to see ourselves in others; that that is our practical form of transcendence,” he said. “To know that we are not alone in this and the world is larger than just our situation or our people … knowing that a group in South Dakota can be in some way like me or like my family. I think finding those similarities is the first step toward bringing communities together to really live in the way of the Gospel and begin radical transformation and reconciliation.”His experience has “created an immense hope” in him, Daniels said.Diocese of Los Angeles Bishop Suffragan Mary Glasspool, another of the pilgrims, said during an interview that she came in search of a simple model of reconciliation for local churches and community groups.“We’re doing it here and all we’re doing is really simple things,” she said. “We’re praying together. We’re singing together. We’re eating together. We’re just being together and we’re accepting each other across differences.”The fruits of the pilgrimage will be hard to measure if the measurer is looking for concrete proof of transformation, Glasspool acknowledged.“The strength of this is in the subtlety of our faith that the Holy Spirit is doing something with us here that will bear fruit, and it will bear fruit, regardless if anybody recognizes it or calls it as such,” she said.Bringing the pilgrimage ‘vision’ to lifeThe land surrounding Christ Episcopal Church is rugged and beautiful – and it has no infrastructure. It is about 45 miles southeast of Mount Rushmore and is reached by a six-tenths of mile drive down a dirt road off the two-lane Bureau of Indian Affairs Highway 41. There are no bathrooms and no electricity.Organizers had to get creative and resist the opinion that such a gathering could not be pulled off. They had to be willing to forgo some things, like showers, and raise money for the gathering in unique ways.Close to 30 portable toilets were lined up for the pilgrims, each with a sign taped to the inside of the door announcing “This bathroom experience has been brought to you by,” followed by the name of a donor from as close as Rapid City, South Dakota, or far away as Sammamish, Washington; Morgantown, West Virginia, and Bronxville, New York.Christian churches in the area and groups, including Lutherans and Jesuits, as well as Episcopalians from all over the church, worked together to prepare for the pilgrims.They carved a trail from the churchyard to a natural amphitheater with a view of Red Shirt Table Mountain the Badlands that served as the pilgrimage’s prayer site. Michael Two Bulls, who spent time at Taizé, said in an interview that such cooperation and dialogue among the churches and between them and the tribal council was a new example of the kind of dialogue that Taizé hopes for.Chris Soukup stirs a pot of buffalo meat for the final lunch at the May 24-27 Taizé “pilgrimage of trust on earth” at Red Shirt Table, South Dakota on the Pine Ridge Sioux Reservation. The Oglala Lakota Nation tribal council donated two buffalos to feed the nearly 600 pilgrims. On the 27 Soukup and his wife, Mary, who attend Calvary Cathedral in Sioux Falls, joined Twila Two Bulls to cook up the leftover. Photo: Mary Frances Schjonberg/Episcopal News ServiceTwyla Two Bulls helped coordinate meals provided by the local Lakota people. The Oglala Sioux Tribal Council supported the event and donated two buffalo for meals. The animals were cooked in the ground.“We are here as pilgrims, not as tourists, so even though we will not be quite as comfortable as we might have been had we been tourists, like staying in a hotel or something, we are here for a much bigger reason than just going to visit a place,” Dunfee told her group. “We are here to bear witness that something great is happening within us.”South Dakota Bishop John Tarrant, who was one of the pilgrims, said “what has really gratified me about this weekend is the energy — the positive energy — the will of those who are organizing it to resist the naysayers.”Tarrant said that the stark nature of the setting “draws people together in relationship and the significance of [meeting on the Pine Ridge] is it’s not only relationship with each other but with the land. That makes this a unique event; it’s not in a hotel or in a city.”The bishop, whose diocese has 47 Native American congregations, said he hoped the pilgrimage would be “an exploration of what it means to be in unity again with each other” and with the land.After the closing prayer service of the May 24-27 Taizé “pilgrimage of trust on earth” at Red Shirt Table, South Dakota, pilgrims and monks carry their makeshift benches of concrete blocks and two-by-fours up the steep from the Taizé worship space fashioned in a natural amphitheater worship space below Christ Episcopal Church. Some of the monks can be seen at the bend in the trail at the upper right. Photo: Mary Frances Schjonberg/Episcopal News ServiceFocus on the next generationThe Red Shirt pilgrimage was especially meant for young people aged 18-35, “a voice rarely heard in the church or in society,” the Taizé brothers said in their invitation to the gathering. Tarrant echoed that sentiment, calling that age group “the generation that the church is missing – young adults.”Leena Fofonoff, a member of the Skolt Samis from Finland, is one young adult who does attend church but she said it was “amazing” to be on pilgrimage at Pine Ridge.“Faith means a lot to me,” she said in an interview. “There’s not so many young people in my church so I go to church with older people. Here I can meet young people who have the same faith.”Asked what she would take home with her from the pilgrimage, Maureen Booher, a young pilgrim from the Lower Brule Indian Reservation, gazed over her shoulder to Red Shirt Table and then answered “the prayer; I really want to keep that going in my own church, and the relationships that it’s going to build.”“I want to get my friends into this but, I’m pretty sure that’s going to be kind of hard,” she added.Taizé Pine Ridge part of a larger processThe Red Shirt event occurred 18 months into a three-and-a-half year process that Brother Alois has called an effort toward forging a new solidarity among the people of the world “that can bring together all who are pilgrims of peace, pilgrims of truth, whether believers or non-believers” and aims to “enable young people from every continent to mobilize their energies, to gather together their longings, intuitions and experiences.”The effort will conclude in August 2015 with a major gathering in Taizé that will also celebrate the 75th anniversary of the order’s founding and what would have been the 100th birthday of the community’s founder, Brother Roger. A 37-year-old Romanian woman who was later found to be mentally ill stabbed Brother Roger to death during Evening Prayer in Taizé on Aug. 16, 2005.A small group of Taizé pilgrims discuss the morning’s Bible study passages, Isaiah 43:18-9 and Isaiah 48:6-8) May 25 against the backdrop of Christ Episcopal Church in Red Shirt Table, South Dakota, complete with sleeping bags airing in the cooler morning air. The 600 pilgrims, mainly aged 18 to 35, came to the Pine Ridge Indian Reservation May 24-27 for the Taizé “pilgrimage of trust on earth.” They spent a significant part of every day in large- and small-group Bible study. Photo: Mary Frances Schjonberg/Episcopal News ServiceThe pattern of Taizé’s daysThe cycle of a typical Taizé pilgrimage day begins at 8 a.m. and ends with an 8 p.m. candlelit prayer service, often followed by a talk from one of the brothers. The day includes meditative prayer combined with music together three times a day, Bible study, workshops and small group discussions. Pilgrims are also assigned work to support the life of the community during their time within it.The brothers have developed a style of music that highlights simple phrases, usually lines from the Psalms or other pieces of Scripture, repeated or sung in canon. The repetition is designed to help meditation and prayer.The Red Shirt gathering followed a similar pattern each day but also included a few differences. Candles on the dry prairie were out of the question so lanterns and solar light substituted. On Sunday, May 25, some participants spent the morning worshipping in local churches while others joined in an Episcopal Eucharist celebrated in the gathering’s large tent because of a morning rain. Also on the 25th, a group of pilgrims went to Wounded Knee to sing and offer silent prayer.On the final morning, the pilgrims gathered for Morning Prayer and a general discussion on their experience and the future before breaking into regional meetings for conversations about what the pilgrims hoped to carry home with them from the experience. The pilgrimage ended with a prayer service.During the closing prayer service, the elder Two Bulls thanked the Taizé brothers for coming to the Pine Ridge. “The Taizé Community offered a lot to us. You let your light shine here,” he said, standing before the monks. “You were an inspiration to us. You have left a legacy we could follow. You taught us how to pray in a different way.”“I hope that someday you might come back again … to continue to teach us,” Two Bulls said.Brother John told the pilgrims during the general session on May 27 that the brothers would return to the United States in 2014. He said they plan three meetings that spring in Texas, including March 21-23 in Austin, April 4-6 in Dallas and April 25-27 in Houston.Background on the origins of Taizé is here.Video interviews with seven Taizé Pine Ridge pilgrims are here.— The Rev. Mary Frances Schjonberg is an editor/reporter for the Episcopal News Service. Ann Fontaine says: Director of Music Morristown, NJ Pine Ridge Taize Curate Diocese of Nebraska Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Comments (9) An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 May 29, 2013 at 11:54 pm I want to go on a pilgrimage there! I would like to go in the winter. Who can organize? Go? Rector Collierville, TN Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Rector Smithfield, NC Cathedral Dean Boise, IDlast_img read more

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Church partners sow seeds of hope, peace for future Sudan

first_img Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Associate Rector Columbus, GA Africa, New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Rector Pittsburgh, PA Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Sudan & South Sudan Jerry Drino says: Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Tags Church partners sow seeds of hope, peace for future Sudan Colorado diocese to send medical, reconciliation team Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Press Release Service Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Submit an Event Listing This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Rector Hopkinsville, KY Rector Washington, DC Rector Collierville, TN Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs Submit a Press Release Comments are closed. The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Featured Events An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Submit a Job Listing September 19, 2014 at 9:54 am Thank you Pat for the great article. We invite others to join us in the support of Sports for Peace – the effort of Bishop John, Michael Puot and John Malek and a committee of ten other university students from seven tribes, as well as a coalition of pastors from the Nuer and Dinka communities in Kakuma and Nairobi. Go to our web site. Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Rector Bath, NC By Pat McCaughanPosted Sep 19, 2014 In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Rector Albany, NY Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Rector Knoxville, TN Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud: Crossing continents and cultures with the most beautiful instrument you’ve never heard Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 South Sudanese refugees at the Kakuma Camp in Kenya collect water for their families.[Episcopal News Service] Michael Puot Rambang hopes soccer and volleyball games will help to promote peace and reconciliation among a generation of future Sudanese leaders.“I was in Juba when the fighting broke out [on Dec. 15, 2013],” Rambang, 26, told the Episcopal News Service (ENS) recently from Nairobi, Kenya. “I was almost killed; they targeted 25 of my neighbors, who were killed.”He escaped to the Kakuma Refugee Camp in northern Kenya, only to discover violence there also. “Everyone was angry. They want to push, and shove. It is not good for people to live like this. I had to come up with something to bring the youth together. That was when I came up with South Sudan Youth for Peace and Reconciliation (SSYPR).”The initiative aims to gather varying communities of Sudanese youth in the camp for a series of sports tournaments paired with peace and reconciliation trainings and other activities. Sowing a spirit of cooperation will also help improve conditions generally in the camp, according to John Malek Kur, also involved in organizing SSYPR’s efforts.“We will help to create a condition whereby we can see where we can reconcile, and counsel them because of the dramatic things they have seen, since war broke out in Juba and elsewhere,” Kur told ENS.“We need to teach them so we can send a team to go and teach and talk peace among the people, and we will extend it slowly to the areas affected by the war,” Kur added.South Sudan emerged as the world’s newest nation in 2011, with Juba as its capital city. Fighting erupted in December 2013 after a political struggle between the president, Salva Kiir, and his former deputy, Riek Machar, displacing as many as one million people. Kiir is from the Dinka tribe and rebel leader Machar is Nuer, representing the two main Sudanese ethnic groups. Many fled to the Kakuma Refugee Camp, which was established in 1992 during decades of Sudanese civil war. An estimated 180,000 people from Sudan, South Sudan, and other African countries reside at the camp.Kur, a former “Lost Boy” now studying peace and conflict transformation at Nairobi’s Daystar University, said camp conditions are challenging. Illness, illiteracy and hunger are pervasive, he said. (The Lost Boys and Girls of Sudan moved to the U.S. as part of a resettlement program in the early ‘00s.)“We have a diverse community in South Sudan and in Camp Kakuma, young people on both sides and the only thing you can do is speak a word of peace to them through soccer. They will play for fun and for a goal,” Kur said. “When they will be working for that goal, they will start talking, realizing their worth, and making friendships among themselves.”SSYPR advisor Bishop John Gattek Wallam of the Bentiu area of the Diocese of Malakal said the plan includes university students serving as trainers for the camp’s youth. The initiative is working in tandem with other like-minded organizations under the umbrella of the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees seeking peace and reconciliation, he said.“The youth are the children of the warring parties [and from different tribes]. Both sides will be able to come together and learn peace and reconciliation,” Wallam told ENS from Kenya recently.The games “will be an outlet for the youth, to participate in peace-building activities. We will organize a program for them, and a concert that will also bring the youth together and also give them reconciliation messages from the Bible,” said Wallam. He was part of a negotiating team that has secured the endorsement of the United Nations and the Kenyan Police Camp manager to establish the Kakuma Peace Initiative and Sports for Peace games.A tentative date to host the games awaits securing project funding and sponsorships, according to the Rev. Jerry Drino of Hope with South Sudan, a San Jose-based education and outreach agency.“This whole effort is lifting up from the ground,” said Drino. Faith communities are at the forefront of the efforts, as are organizations like the American Friends of the Episcopal Church in Sudan (AFRECS), and Episcopal Relief & Development who are working to alleviate hardships in Sudan, he added.Pockets of hope exist amid the continuing crisis in Sudan, Drino said. He urged Episcopalians across the church to support the organization of fledgling peace efforts.“The good news is that already there are sporadic games with mixed tribal teams being played in Kakuma and that the Mothers Union and Presbyterian women are coming together to pray across tribal lines. The SSYPR will give them greater incentive to continue and expand this work.”Bishop Andudu Elnail of Kadugli and South Sudanese members of the Mothers’ Union participate in a worship service at the Kakuma Camp in Kenya.Colorado: October visit to offer medical, pastoral care training,A medical and pastoral care team from the Diocese of Colorado, seeking to alleviate refugee camp conditions and to support the efforts of Sudanese Bishop Andudu Adam Elnail of the Diocese of Kadugli, is planning an Oct. 28-Nov. 9 trip to the Kakuma Refugee Camp, according to Anita Sanborn, president of the Colorado Episcopal Foundation.Team members will focus on health issues and offer pastoral care, human rights, leadership and peace-building trainings, she said.The team initially intended to visit the Yida Refugee Camp in South Sudan in January of this year, Sanborn said. But the trip, funded by the United Thank Offering (UTO) and Episcopal Relief & Development and private donations, was rescheduled for the Kakuma Camp after the December fighting broke out.The team focus will include newborn and maternal health, basic hygiene and health care, identifying symptoms of trauma and self-care for clergy and lay leaders.“There will be a segment on human rights, teaching what the United Nations Declaration of Human Rights is all about, so people understand in this time of exile what their rights really are and to give them a sense of hope that they don’t need to be landless forever, but to prepare for a time when they can return home,” Sanborn added.Sanborn described Elnail as a bishop without a diocese. ENS’s efforts to reach him were unsuccessful.Elnail was in the United States for medical treatment in 2012 when Sudanese government forces entered Kadugli, raided his office, destroyed some equipment and confiscated others, Sanborn said. He began advocacy efforts and in 2013 was granted U.S. asylum. He organized an office in Juba to provide a base of operations for the thousands of Nuba people fleeing into the South.Sanborn also urged Episcopalians across the church to continue support for the Sudanese people, even though media focus may have shifted elsewhere.“When compassion fatigue seems so pervasive, it would be my hope that we in the Episcopal Church here continue to stand by the Sudanese refugees who’ve been sent here,” Sanborn said of Sudanese communities throughout the United States.“There are so many ways people can get involved,” she added. “It doesn’t have to always mean going to Sudan. It’s important to be aware and to be educated about what is going on, if people will just take that step. And to remember that prayer is always needed.”— The Rev. Pat McCaughan is a correspondent for the Episcopal News Service.The U.S.-based Episcopal Church has long-standing partnerships with the Episcopal Church of Sudan and South Sudan, through companion diocese relationships, Episcopal Relief & Development programs and the advocacy work of the Office of Government Relations.Current companion relationships include Albany (New York) with the Province of Sudan, Bethlehem (Pennsylvania) with Kajo Keji, Chicago with Renk, Indianapolis with Bor, Missouri with Lui, Rhode Island with Ezo, Southwestern Virginia with the Province of Sudan, and Virginia with the Province of Sudan.Partnerships also exist through various networks such as the American Friends of the Episcopal Church of Sudan and Hope With South Sudan. Rector Shreveport, LA Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Rector Smithfield, NC Rector Tampa, FL Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Director of Music Morristown, NJ Comments (1) Youth Minister Lorton, VA Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Advocacy Peace & Justice, Rector Martinsville, VA Curate Diocese of Nebraska The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Featured Jobs & Calls Rector Belleville, ILlast_img read more

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Rains cause roof collapse at Cape Town’s St George Cathedral

first_img Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Posted Aug 1, 2016 Tags Rector Washington, DC Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Anglican Communion TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Submit an Event Listing Associate Rector Columbus, GA Submit a Press Release Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Rector Martinsville, VA Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Rector Hopkinsville, KY Featured Events Rector Belleville, IL Rector Tampa, FL Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Rector Pittsburgh, PA The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Featured Jobs & Calls Submit a Job Listing Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Youth Minister Lorton, VA Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Rector Bath, NC Curate Diocese of Nebraska Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Director of Music Morristown, NJ This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Africa, New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Rector Shreveport, LA Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Press Release Service Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector Knoxville, TN Rector Smithfield, NC The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Rector Collierville, TN Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Rains cause roof collapse at Cape Town’s St George Cathedral Rector Albany, NY In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC last_img read more

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