WHO updates rules to prevent spread of disease

first_imgMay 24, 2005 (CIDRAP News) – Member countries of the World Health Organization (WHO) yesterday approved the first major revision of the WHO’s rules to prevent the international spread of diseases in decades.The new version of the International Health Regulations reflects lessons learned over the past 30 years and especially the world’s experience with SARS (severe acute respiratory syndrome) in 2003 and avian influenza in the past 2 years, the WHO said yesterday.”The new regulations bring disease control into the twenty-first century,” Dr Anarfi Asamoa-Baah, WHO assistant director-general in charge of communicable diseases, stated in a WHO news release. “With this framework, we can now support the work of countries in controlling outbreaks more effectively. The regulations provide WHO with new, clearly defined roles and responsibilities as we help countries to respond to disease outbreaks.”The new regulations, which take effect 2 years from now, were approved by the World Health Assembly yesterday in Geneva. The rules require member countries to have or develop specific capabilities to identify and respond to public health emergencies of international concern and to take routine preventive measures at ports, airports, and border stations.”Every country already has some of these capacities but almost no country has a perfect system,” said Dr Max Hardiman of WHO, who coordinated the revision of the regulations. “The new regulations set clear standards and will help countries to identify where their disease surveillance and response must improve.”The WHO originally adopted what were then called the International Sanitary Regulations in 1951; they were renamed in 1969 and modified in 1973 and 1981. The rules were originally designed to help monitor and control six serious infectious diseases: cholera, plague, yellow fever, smallpox, relapsing fever, and typhus.”The new rules will govern a broader range of public health emergencies of international concern, including emerging diseases,” the WHO said.The rules include a list of diseases that must be reported to the WHO, such as smallpox, polio, and SARS, along with guidelines to help countries decide whether other outbreaks or threats are of international concern. Under the existing regulations, only cholera, plague, and yellow fever must be reported to the WHO.The regulations also address the “natural occurrence, accidental release or deliberate use of biological and chemical agents or radionuclear material,” according to an Agence France-Presse (AFP) report published yesterday.WHO officials have said the revised rules largely reflect existing informal procedures that have been developed in recent years, the AFP report said.Dr Guenael Rodier, WHO director of communicable disease surveillance and response, commented in the news release, “The existing regulations were written for a very different world from the one we live in today. Air travel was a luxury and the movement of goods and people around the world was relatively slow. Today, travel and trade have expanded far beyond what was envisaged under the original regulations. The new rules respond to a globalized, 24-hour world in which a disease outbreak in one country can rapidly move around the world.”The revision of the regulations has taken several years and “an enormous amount of work” by all 192 member countries of the WHO, the agency said. The project was capped by several long sessions of a working group chaired by Ambassador Mary Whelan of Ireland.See also:May 23 WHO news releasehttp://www.who.int/mediacentre/news/releases/2005/pr_wha03/en/index.htmlWHO International Health Regulations pagehttp://www.who.int/csr/ihr/en/Full text of regulations (60 pages)https://apps.who.int/gb/ebwha/pdf_files/WHA58/A58_55-en.pdflast_img read more

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Canada reports 10th case of BSE

first_imgMay 4, 2007 (CIDRAP News) – Canada recently confirmed its tenth case of bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE), or mad cow disease—its second of 2007. The age of the animal falls within the age range of Canada’s previous BSE cases and is consistent with the known incubation period of the disease, the CFIA report noted. CFIA officials determined that the 66-month-old animal was born after a 1997 feed ban, imposed by Canada and the United States to prevent the spread of BSE from contaminated protein from cattle and other ruminants in cattle feed. The preliminary investigation suggests that the animal was probably exposed to a very small amount of infective material, most likely during its first year of life. The CFIA said it would launch an epidemiologic investigation to identify the animal’s herdmates at its time of birth and how it might have become infected. “It is not unexpected to find BSE-infected animals born after the feed ban. This has proven to be the case in most other countries with targeted surveillance, similar to that in Canada,” the CFIA report said. The case was found in a mature dairy cow from British Columbia, the Canadian Food Inspection Agency (CFIA) said in a May 2 statement. The disease was detected through Canada’s ongoing surveillance program. The cow’s carcass is under CFIA custody, and no part of it entered the human food or animal feed systems, the CFIA said. On Jul 12, an extension of Canada’s feed ban goes into effect. It bans potentially infective cattle parts (specified risk materials) to all animal feeds, not just feed for ruminants.last_img read more

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UN: H5N1 responses improving, but threat persists

first_imgNov 30, 2007 (CIDRAP News) – Many countries have improved their responses to H5N1 avian influenza outbreaks in poultry in the past year, but the disease remains entrenched in six countries, according to a new report from the United Nations and the World Bank.Amid the persisting threat that the H5N1 virus will spark a human flu pandemic, governments need to do more to coordinate their pandemic planning efforts, according to a UN news release about the report. The report itself was not released online.”The pandemic threat has led most Governments to improve services to detect, contain and lessen the impact of dangerous pathogens,” the UN statement says. “Many national pandemic plans, however, are not sufficiently operational and the coordination of pandemic planning between countries needs greater attention.”Dr. David Nabarro, the UN’s senior influenza coordinator, commented in the statement, “The most urgent need, now, is for the Governments of different countries to work together. First, they must contain avian influenza and other animal diseases that might affect humans. Second, they must prepare for influenza and other possible pandemics.”The report was released in advance of a global conference on avian and pandemic flu, scheduled Dec 4 to 6 in New Delhi. The document comes a week after a World Health Organization (WHO) conference in Geneva made little headway toward solving a dispute over the international sharing of H5N1 virus samples and in the wake of poultry outbreaks in Romania, the United Kingdom, Saudi Arabia, Vietnam, Bangladesh, and Pakistan.The report says H5N1 avian flu has been reported in 60 countries since 2003, according to a Nov 29 Reuters story. The UN statement does not list the six countries in which the virus remains well established, but the Reuters story quotes the report as saying the virus “is currently entrenched in Indonesia, Egypt and Nigeria, and possibly in some locations in China and Bangladesh.”Nabarro said H5N1 is being “continuously transmitted” in at least half the districts of Indonesia, according to an Agence France-Presse (AFP) report .”Intensive control efforts—including vaccination of poultry—are being mounted in these settings [countries where the virus is entrenched] to get the disease under control and eliminate outbreaks when they occur,” the UN said. “Under present conditions, most other countries are able to control outbreaks when they occur in other settings.”Reuters quoted the report as saying, “Outbreaks are being detected more rapidly and the response is more effective. However, animal health services are still substandard in most countries—they lack necessary regulatory frameworks, budgets, laboratory capacity and implementation of biosecurity measures.”In regard to governmental responses to poultry outbreaks, the report largely echoes a UN Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO) statement issued in June. At that point the FAO said responses to H5N1 outbreaks had improved significantly in the preceding 3 years but that the virus remained entrenched in several countries and would continue to spread.The UN said nations that initially treated avian flu as an emergency are now developing “longer-term sustainable strategies for the healthy rearing and management of waterfowl, and investing in animal health, including better-run veterinary services.”The document also calls on countries to share H5N1 virus samples. Indonesia, the country hit hardest by avian flu, has shared very few samples over the past year, contending that the long-standing international system for flu surveillance is unfair because rich countries use virus samples from poor countries to develop vaccines that the poor countries can’t afford.A Nov 29 story from the UN News Service says the report calls for the urgent creation of a 3- to 5-year road map to drive intergovernmental action to control avian flu and improve global readiness for other health crises.The UN report is based on data provided by 143 countries, the UN said. Ninety-five percent of the countries said they are planning for a pandemic. Some of these have taken steps to ensure continuity of vital infrastructure in a pandemic, and some have tested their plans in simulation exercises.See also: Nov 29 UN press releasehttp://www.un.org/News/Press/docs//2007/sag417.doc.htmNov 29 story from UN News Servicehttp://www.un.org/apps/news/story.asp?NewsID=24848&Cr=avian&Cr1=fluJun 27 CIDRAP News story “FAO says avian flu entrenched as new outbreaks appear”last_img read more

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Letters to the Editor for Thursday, June 27

first_imgCategories: Letters to the Editor, OpinionAutomatic Voter Registration neededNew York state is considering passing an Automatic Voter Registration bill.This bill acknowledges the obligation of our government to help our citizens gain access to their ballots.Regardless of political party control, Automatic Voter Registration is either fully implemented or will be soon in 15 states: Alaska, California, Colorado, District of Columbia, Georgia, Illinois, Maryland, Michigan, Nevada, Massachusetts, New Jersey, Oregon, Rhodes Island, Vermont, Washington, and West Virginia. The reason why automatic voter registration is needed is that our citizens struggle to apply for and maintain their voter registration status.The bill wasn’t passed this year. But when enacted sometime next year, it will help citizens by removing an unnecessary barrier that stands between them and their ballot box.When a citizen updates their information with the DMV, their information automatically is transmitted to the Board of Elections.When a citizen applies for a license at DMV they will be automatically registered to vote and will then be contacted by the Board of Elections to inform them of their polling place. Currently, the DMV checks the citizenship of all who seek a driver’s license and asks if the citizen wants to register to vote. This system protects our elections system from those who are not eligible to vote. As citizens, it is our fundamental right to vote and it is the fundamental obligation of our government to provide us with access to the ballot box.William B. CookSchenectadyThe writer is Director of Legislation for the New York State Association of Letter Carriers, AFL-CIO.Give Lady Liberty a place of honor in cityWe’ve all heard the expression “Where does the time go?” Here it is June 2019. The campaign for returning the Statue of Liberty to her rightful place started about March 26, 2018.Now, we hear that the mayor will make a decision around July 4, 2019.We, the People could not have picked a better day to finally put this problem to bed and bring a smile to Lady Liberty as she returns home.On Nov. 9, 1950, The Gazette wrote about the dedication of the statue after a parade of 2,500 Boy Scouts observed by 3,500 watchers as the statue found a “permanent” home as the gateway to Schenectady.When the mayor decides that Gateway Plaza is the best place for the Statue of Liberty to rest, many more citizens can view her and thank her for being our sign of “Liberty and Freedom for all.”The only other better suited place for the statue would be in Veteran’s Park, which would be a proper place with all the respect she deserves from the many veterans that respect her.James A. WilsonSchenectadyGrateful for support of Holocaust projectI would like to sincerely thank the Niskayuna Town Board for its unanimous vote of support granting a Special Use Permit enabling the development of the Capital District Jewish Holocaust Memorial.We will continue to work with the Niskayuna community to make this memorial a meaningful expression of their care and concern for human dignity and a message against hate and bigotry.Neil Golub and Rabbi Matt Cutler contributed significantly, and everyone working as a team brought us to this moment of achievement.Dr. Michael LozmanLathamThe writer is president and founder of Capital District Jewish Holocaust Memorial.More from The Daily Gazette:Gov. Andrew Cuomo’s press conference for Sunday, Oct. 18EDITORIAL: Beware of voter intimidationEDITORIAL: Thruway tax unfair to working motoristsFoss: Should main downtown branch of the Schenectady County Public Library reopen?EDITORIAL: Urgent: Today is the last day to complete the censuslast_img read more

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Chance to rent Brisbane’s own ‘Up’ House

first_imgIn the 2009 Pixar film, Carl Fredericksen’s saved his house by tying balloons to it and piloting to Paradise Falls — the real-life house is being defended by neighbours. If approved it will see the construction of a five-storey residential building comprising four two-bedroom and two three-bedroom apartments. The City North News reported in August that the 1900-built home at 151 Sydney St, New Farm on 506sq m was wedged in between two apartment towers and was the only character house left from the park side of Sydney St to the Brisbane River. MORE: Neighbours fight to save ‘UP’ house Haggle a lower mortgage rate: ACCC RELATED: In the meantime, the home is available for rent at $760 a week from January 21 next year.The two-bedroom house has all the hallmarks of a Queensland character home, including polished timber floors, casement windows, VJ walls and high ceilings.According to CoreLogic, the owners purchased the home in 2012 for $735,000. The house at the centre of a neighbourhood dispute, 151 Sydney St, New Farm is now up for rent.More from newsParks and wildlife the new lust-haves post coronavirus15 hours agoNoosa’s best beachfront penthouse is about to hit the market15 hours agoUrban Planners Queensland director Jessica Reynolds declined to comment about the owners decision to rent the home, but in August said the plans represented an opportunity to enhance the suburb.According to Cordell, the proposal is still possible with the development application submitted and awaiting council decision.center_img Alexandra Buchanan Architecture’s proposal for a five-level apartment building at 151 Sydney St, New Farm. >>FOLLOW EMILY BLACK ON FACEBOOK<< Video Player is loading.Play VideoPlayNext playlist itemMuteCurrent Time 0:00/Duration 2:09Loaded: 0%Stream Type LIVESeek to live, currently playing liveLIVERemaining Time -2:09 Playback Rate1xChaptersChaptersDescriptionsdescriptions off, selectedCaptionscaptions settings, opens captions settings dialogcaptions off, selectedQuality Levels720p720pHD432p432p360p360p216p216pAutoA, selectedAudio Tracken (Main), selectedFullscreenThis is a modal window.Beginning of dialog window. Escape will cancel and close the window.TextColorWhiteBlackRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyOpaqueSemi-TransparentBackgroundColorBlackWhiteRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyOpaqueSemi-TransparentTransparentWindowColorBlackWhiteRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyTransparentSemi-TransparentOpaqueFont Size50%75%100%125%150%175%200%300%400%Text Edge StyleNoneRaisedDepressedUniformDropshadowFont FamilyProportional Sans-SerifMonospace Sans-SerifProportional SerifMonospace SerifCasualScriptSmall CapsReset restore all settings to the default valuesDoneClose Modal DialogEnd of dialog window.This is a modal window. This modal can be closed by pressing the Escape key or activating the close button.Close Modal DialogThis is a modal window. This modal can be closed by pressing the Escape key or activating the close button.PlayMuteCurrent Time 0:00/Duration 0:00Loaded: 0%Stream Type LIVESeek to live, currently playing liveLIVERemaining Time -0:00 Playback Rate1xFullscreenWhy rental affordability is a problem02:09 Agency recruits to keep up with market UP AND AWAY: Carl Fredericksen’s saved his house by tying balloons to it and piloting to Paradise Falls.The house at the centre of a neighbourhood dispute, dubbed the ‘Up’ house, has been listed for rent on realestate.com.au. New Farm and Districts Historical Society president Ross Garnett said New Farm’s history should be preserved, “whether they be a gentleman’s villa or worker’s cottage … these older homes are important for their architecture and the history of their components”. At the time, neighbours Llyod and Judy Whish-Wilson said in a submission to council that they “were extremely surprised that BCC has allowed this development application to reach the stage of public consultation”.last_img read more

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Robbins earns ‘Jack Hurst Award’

first_imgGreensburg Rotary Club Past President Mandy Jo Lohrum is pictured with long time Greensburg Rotarian Bill Robbins. Also pictured are Rotarians Daryl Tressler and Larry Moore.Greensburg, In. — Long-time Greensburg Rotarian Bill Robbins has been named the recipient of the 2017-18 Jack Hurst Award.Bill has served for 50 years and has planned the 50th and 75th anniversary celebrations, and is now planning the 100th anniversary celebration planned in 2020.Jack Hurst was an outstanding Rotarian for many years IN Greensburg.last_img read more

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Man City star set to quit Premier League on one condition

first_img The Belgian playmaker insists that his future at the Etihad Stadium will not be influenced by whether Pep Guardiola sticks around, however. De Bruyne has admitted he is concerned over UEFA’s decision to ban City from European competitions for two seasons for breaching FFP regulations.He is approaching the peak years of his career and will “review” his situation when a decision over the club’s appeal is made.“I’m just waiting,” De Bruyne said. “The club has told us that they are going to appeal – and that they are almost 100 per cent sure that they are right. That’s why I’m waiting to see what will happen. I trust my team.“Once the statement is made, I will review everything. Two years would be long. In the case of one year I might see.”De Bruyne is the key component of Guardiola’s team and has established himself as one of the world’s top players under the Catalan’s management.The 28-year-old was asked whether Guardiola’s plans would affect his future during a video call with HLN and he said: “Not particularly. I think Pep said he will be here next year anyway, no matter what.“Then his contract ends. But I’m not going to let my decision depend on what Pep is doing.“Of course I have already worked with other trainers and when Pep leaves, I have to continue working with someone else.“But I haven’t really paid much attention to that for the time being.“There are more important things at the moment.”A host of clubs would be on alert if De Bruyne does decide to push for an exit. Real Madrid and Barcelona are fans, while Bayern Munich attempted to secure his services from Wolfsburg before City swooped in 2015.Kevin De Bruyne has dropped a hint he could quit Manchester CityRead Also: Ronaldo hangs out with girlfriend, oldest son in MadeiraDe Bruyne said: “To be honest, I’m very happy with City. I play for one of the best teams in the world, play in England – for my competitive view the best competition – and I like that.“It remains a challenge to be the best and I need that too.“What is coming is coming. But it’s not that I’ve tried to leave City in those five years.“I have also remained calm for my previous transfers. I have never had any problems and have always waited for my moment.”FacebookTwitterWhatsAppEmail分享 Kevin De Bruyne has dropped a hint that he could quit Manchester City if the club’s Champions League ban is upheld.Advertisement Loading… Promoted ContentYou’ve Only Seen Such Colorful Hairdos In A Handful Of Anime7 Things That Actually Ruin Your Phone7 Ways To Understand Your Girlfriend Better8 Superfoods For Growing Hair Back And Stimulating Its Growth9 Talented Actors Who Are Only Associated With One RoleWhat Our Favorite Celebs Look Like With Their Natural Hair ColorThe Most Exciting Cities In The World To VisitThe Highest Paid Football Players In The WorldWho Is The Most Powerful Woman On Earth?Best & Worst Celebrity Endorsed Games Ever Made6 Incredibly Strange Facts About HurricanesCan Playing Too Many Video Games Hurt Your Body?last_img read more

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Q&A with Golden Bears beat writer Jonathan Kuperberg of The Daily Californian

first_img Facebook Twitter Google+ Published on March 22, 2013 at 5:24 pm Contact Ryne: rjgery@syr.edu After blowing Montana away to open the NCAA Tournament on Thursday, Syracuse will take on 12th-seeded California at 9:40 p.m. on Saturday in the third round in San Jose, Calif. The Golden Bears (21-11) advanced with a 64-61 win over UNLV, highlighted by Allen Crabbe’s game-high 19 points. Crabbe, a 6-foot-6, 210-pound guard, earned Pac-12 Player of the Year honors after leading the conference in scoring with 18.7 points per game this season. Point guard Justin Cobbs provides Cal with another offensive threat as he averages 15.4 points per game and 4.8 assists per game.The Daily Orange broke down Saturday’s matchup with Jonathan Kuperberg, who covers the Golden Bears for The Daily Californian.The Daily Orange: What makes Crabbe tough for opponents to stop and how do you think he matches up with Syracuse’s zone defense?Jonathan Kuperberg: Crabbe has always been a great outside shooter, but this season his mid-range game has been even more effective. Teams can’t just run him off the 3-point line anymore. He curls around screens at the elbow, and as the No. 1 option, his teammates are always looking for him. Tentative by nature, Crabbe is finally starting to be aggressive. Cal should put him at the free throw line against Syracuse’s 2-3 zone and not just settle for 3-pointers, as the Bears won’t be able to pull off the upset just from hot outside shooting.The D.O.: Besides Crabbe, who else will need to have a big night for Cal to pull the upset on Saturday?AdvertisementThis is placeholder textJK: To beat Syracuse, everyone on Cal will have to play well. All-Pac-12 second-teamer Justin Cobbs needs to take care of the ball and provide a scoring punch to complement Crabbe. The Bears need to make open shots and not just take 3s because they are open. Forward Richard Solomon (8.5 ppg, 6.6 rpg) is key. He is an emotional player and tends to disappear in games if he has a rough start. But when he is energized early, such as in the win over UNLV, Solomon gives his team a huge boost on both sides of the court.The D.O.: Cal led the Pac-12 in field goal percentage defense (39.6 percent) during the year. What led to that success, and how do you think the Golden Bears will approach the Orange defensively?JK: It seemed to be mainly a mental approach. The players finally bought into coach Mike Montgomery’s defensive philosophy and realized that they could win games through defense when their shots were not falling. Cal has mixed in its sort of 1-2-2 zone with man defense but played almost exclusive zone against UNLV. The Bears are not a deep team — Crabbe and Cobbs play heavy minutes — so their zone can hide players in foul trouble. Trust Montgomery to pick the right kind of defense for the right spot. The players just need to stay focused.The D.O.: Being about an hour from Cal’s campus, how much of a factor do you think home-court advantage could play for the Bears in this one?JK: I don’t think it’s that much of an advantage. There were probably more Cal fans than any other fan base on Thursday, but they were not so loud that they made a difference in the game. The advantage is in the fact that the team can go back to Berkeley and has more flexibility in scheduling and practice. If Cal wins, it won’t be because the game is in San Jose.The D.O.: What needs to happen for the Golden Bears to top the Orange and advance to the Sweet Sixteen?JK: The Bears basically need to do everything well. Crabbe and Cobbs must have big games, and at least another player or two will need to step up on the offensive end, for surely Syracuse’s defense will be shaded toward Cal’s top duo. The Bears can’t let the Orange run away with the game. Cal, having won many close games throughout the season, knows how to finish, so if the Bears can start strong and keep the game close, an upset could happen. Commentslast_img read more

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Syracuse adds verbal pledge from Class of 2014 cornerback

first_imgThe 5-foot-10, 180-pound Williams is ranked a two-star prospect by Rivals.com and unranked by Scout.com. He was recruited from Cherry Hill West High School by SU defensive line coach Tim Daoust, according to Rivals.com. Williams also had an offer from Temple.Williams becomes the fifth member of the Orange’s Class of 2014, joining linebackers Colton Moskal and Zaire Franklin, quarterback A.J. Long and local running back Naesean Howard, though none of the five have formally signed with SU. Comments Syracuse picked up a verbal commitment from Rodney Williams, a cornerback from Cherry Hill, N.J., on Friday. Williams announced his commitment via Twitter.Verbally committed Syracuse University !!!— Rodney Williams (@R2XU6) June 21, 2013 Thanks for all the kudos I appreciate it and been putting in work for this. Now I’m an ACC boy!!AdvertisementThis is placeholder text— Rodney Williams (@R2XU6) June 21, 2013 Facebook Twitter Google+ Published on June 21, 2013 at 6:17 pm Contact David: dbwilson@syr.edu | @DBWilson2last_img read more

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Women’s hockey: Special senior night propels Badgers to series win over Bulldogs

first_imgSenior captain Blayre Turnbull enthralled LaBahn Arena on Saturday night with quite possibly her signature game at Wisconsin, propelling the Badgers to a 5-0 win over Minnesota-Duluth.Turnbull created history by netting her first-career hat trick, but the way it was done had never been accomplished in the program’s history.The Wisconsin captain’s hat-trick came off of three power-play goals.Turnbull opened scoring at 10:51 in the first period, taking advantage of happenstance when the UMD defender marking her fell down. She then glided in on net and sent a backhander through Kayla Black’s five-hole for the opening goal.Turnbull drew praise from her teammates and head coach Mark Johnson, who cited the captain’s work ethic and effort as deserving of her goals, especially on the special night where her father traveled from her hometown Stellarton, Nova Scotia to watch his daughter play.“It’s senior night, (Turnbull’s) dad was in town, and it’s an emotional start to the game,” Johnson said. “For her to go out that way and get a hat-trick on a special night, being a captain and all, you have to be happy for her.”Badgers goaltender Ann-Renee Desbiens was tested early but kept her cool, making a memorable sliding-butterfly save in a 2-on-1 situation for the Bulldogs to preserve Wisconsin’s lead.Freshman forward Annie Pankowski then opened the lead to two at 17:48 in the first frame after finding the puck in the crease for a backhand when Black left a rebound for the taking, with the Badgers scoring again on a power play.Turnbull tallied her second of the game 1:22 later in the period to increase the lead to three when she put home an advantageous rebound in front of net.Evelina Suonpaa came in for the second period in net for the Bulldogs to replace Black, who let up three first period goals.Turnbull netted her third goal of the night at 9:15 in the third period when she sent a wrist shot into the back of the net through heavy traffic, once more on the power play.“It’s exciting, but I think the important thing is that we won,” Turnbull said. “We won by more than one. That’s something we’ve been working on in practice with getting pucks to the net.”Emily Clark brought the Badgers’ tally to five later on in the period by way of a tip-in. The game eased the criticism Wisconsin has been facing recently about its lack of offensive production.The Bulldogs seemed to drop off energy-wise midway through the second period, leading to a relatively stress-free third period for the Badgers in which they scored twice.Badgers, Bulldogs battle to scoreless tie FridayDespite the buzz of the crowd Friday night, there was not much buzz on the ice as the Wisconsin women’s hockey team welcomed University of Minnesota–Duluth to LaBahn Arena.A defensive battle unfolded before the eyes of those watching, and it wasn’t for the lack of trying that neither team scored until the eventual shootout.The Badgers put up 41 shots through three periods, many of them originating from odd-skater rushes in which UMD’s goaltender Kayla Black slammed the door shut each time. UMD didn’t play the role of a doormat either, and fired 23 quality shots in return.Wisconsin’s missed opportunities reflect the trend of the past few weeks. Quite simply, UW has found itself unable to score despite high shot totals. The Badgers averaged about 43 shots per game since resuming play after the winter break, but in the same time have only managed to put up 2.75 goals per game.The Badgers’ play reflected this early in the first period when Baylee Wellhausen whiffed on a puck sent to her while unmarked just beyond the crease. Many other rushes ended in this fashion; they developed into tips sent just wide and scrums in which Black fell on or covered the puck.The rest of the first period followed the same scheme, and through a very choppy second period with many stoppages and a third period full of more missed opportunities, the game eventually headed to overtime and the shootout tied at zero.“Today their goaltender played very well,” Johnson said. “They defend well. We missed the net quite a bit because of that. They do a lot of the little things that make it hard to get second opportunities.”Several players voiced opinions similar to Johnson’s about UMD’s high quality of defensive play, but in the eventual shootout, the Badgers proved that the Bulldogs were not invincible after all.After a Turnbull miss and UMD’s Zoe Hickel missing as well, Pankowski scored for UW after she flipped the puck to her backhand across the face of net and past Black’s pokecheck, skillfully placing the puck into the bottom right corner.The shootout went until UMD’s last shooter, Katerina Mrazova, completely fooled Wisconsin netminder Desbiens. Mrazova stick handled as she glided in on net, pushed the puck on to her backhand and deked, forcing Desbiens to commit to her right side. Mrazova then, while still on her backhand, toe-dragged the puck back on to her forehand and pushed the puck into the net for the equalizing goal.However, Sidney Mckibbon followed up with a precisely timed wrist shot under Black’s right pad in the fourth round to give the Badgers a 2-1 lead in the shootout. Desbiens then sealed the Bulldogs’ fate with a sliding butterfly save to preserve the win and earn the two points.“It was a hard-fought battle,” Mckibbon said. “It was a lot like a playoff game. It was a really good win for our team.”Wisconsin secured second place in the WCHA by taking five of six points from the third place Bulldogs.Next week the Badgers travel to Ohio State to take on the Buckeyes in their second-to-last series in the regular season, looking to build on their seven-game unbeaten streak.last_img read more

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