IPodBased Translator Provides Words Dialects Gestures

first_img This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only. VCom3D signed its first contract with the US Army last summer to provide 260 of the “VCommunicator” gadgets for US troops in Iraq. The devices were deployed last month.The military is hoping that the devices will help to improve communication between soldiers and locals in the midst of a shortage of interpreters in Iraq and Afghanistan.The VCommunicator is kind of a “hacked” i-Pod; its “playlists” are different military scenarios, and its “songs” are phrases in MP3 format. The device contains several megabytes of Middle Eastern voice files, including a menu of languages such as Iraqi Arabic, Pashtu and Dari. Choosing a phrase involves two steps: first, soldiers click on the type of mission, such as vehicle checkpoint, interrogation, patrol, or raid. Then, each mission program displays numerous phrases relevant to the situation. When soldiers click on a phrase, the device displays an animated figure that repeats the phrase in accents and demonstrates gestures that are specific to the culture.Soldiers can use the VCommunicator both as a learning device and to actually conduct operations. For example, at a security checkpoint, it can be connected to a megaphone and a large TV screen to communicate to oncoming vehicles. In urban search missions, it can be hooked up to a small mobile speaker to talk to individual people.To ensure the accuracy of the device, Vcom3D consulted with a large network of linguists and other cultural experts when writing and testing the content. The company double-checked the pronunciation, idiom, context, meaning and other nuances of the various languages.Vcom3D explains that, while the translator can´t substitute for real interpreters and doesn´t provide the sophistication of real-time voice-recognition translation systems by companies such as IBM, the VCommunicator may have a practical advantage. It´s lightweight, simple to use, and can be learned in just a few hours.After trying “cumbersome and ineffective” translation devices, the Army sees the potential of the new commercial gadget, and hopes that it will help overcome a major communication barrier.Via: Orlando Sentinel A company from Orlando, Florida, is hoping that its new i-Pod-based translator will be easier to use and more practical compared with more sophisticated translators, especially for soldiers in Iraq and Afghanistan. Explore further VCom3D´s VCommunicator Citation: I-Pod-Based Translator Provides Words, Dialects, Gestures (2007, December 12) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2007-12-i-pod-based-words-dialects-gestures.html Vcom3D’s iPod translator device is a valuable tool for U.S. soldierslast_img read more

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Mitsubishi 3D Touch Panel Demonstrated

first_imgImage copyright: Tech-On!, Nikkei Business Publications Samsung Introduces Advanced Mobile and Digital Information Displays The 3D touch panel functions by switching between two detection methods and would be determined by the position of the finger. When a finger approaches the panel, it’s defined as being in “proximity state” After the finger is in contact with the panel it’s in “contact state”. In “proximity state”, priority is given to the screen’s sensitivity and in “contact state”, resolution has priority.The panel can detect a capacitance change of approximately 0.3pF in the proximity state and about 8 to 19pF in the contact state, according to a spokesperson for Mitsubishi Electric Corp. In the proximity state the resolution in the x- and y- axis is equivalent to 10mm. In respect to the z-axis direction, “it is possible to determine the distance of the finger as long as it is less than 20mm,” the spokesperson said. The company also stated that in the contact state, the resolution in the x-axis and y-axis directions is equivalent to 0.2mm.Sensitivity in the proximity state is increased by connecting multiple sensors to increase the sensor area. Parasitic capacity has also been reduced by adding a “sensor shield control”. This function eliminates the need for a shield layer that reduces electromagnetic noise generated from an LCD panel.This prototype is based on a capacitive touch panel that is available on the market today, and only required a few changes. The changes involved adding switch elements to connect multiple sensors and improved the detection circuit to reduce its parasitic capacity. Since the touch panel is still in its developmental stages, there is no set time as to when it will be publically announced. The company needs to verify its resistance to environment as well as operability in actual devices before it can become marketable.via Tech-On!, Nikkei© 2009 PhysOrg.com (PhysOrg.com) — A prototyped capacitive touch panel was demonstrated by Mitsubishi Electric Corp at the Interaction 2009 in Tokyo, Japan. The 3D touch panel can detect not only x- and y- coordinates but also its z- coordinates by detecting the distance between a finger and panel. Screen size is approximately 5.7 inches with a resolution of 640 x 480 pixels. Explore further Citation: Mitsubishi 3D Touch Panel Demonstrated (2009, March 13) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2009-03-mitsubishi-3d-panel.html This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only.last_img read more

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UIUC team will show canttell photo inserts at Siggraph w video

first_img(PhysOrg.com) — Visitors to this month’s Siggraph Asia conference on computer graphics from December 12 to 15 will witness a presentation from a team at the University of Illinois in Urbana Champaign on how to tweak photos by adding in something that was not there before. They will present their study, Rendering Synthetic Objects into Legacy Photographs, which details their approach. This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only. So what? What could possibly be new about this? Their method has more going for it than older techniques used by the Kremlin or budding Photoshop enthusiasts. The team, Kevin Karsch, Varsha Hedau, David Forsyth, Derek Hoiem, can simulate lighting conditions so that the object looks realistic.Humans can quickly detect photo fraud, maintains Karsch. They can do so in spotting lighting inconsistencies in a doctored photograph.In contrast, the university team’s method, he says, is successfully confusable even for people who pride themselves in spotting differences.If you don’t know the perspective, if you don’t know the geometry of an object, then you are just manipulating pixels, he commented, with unconvincing results.In their computer program, a user is asked to select light sources in the picture. An algorithm recreates the 3-D geometry and lighting of the scene and the artificial object is inserted into its new environment. The program adds shadows and highlights to the object before converting it back to 2-D.The weakness in existing photo editing programs, they say, is that they simply insert a 2-D object. Karsch, a computer science doctoral student whose advisor is David Forsyth, explains that image editing software that only allows 2-D manipulations does not account for high-level spatial information that is present in a given scene, yet 3-D modeling tools may be complex and tedious for novice users. The team set out to extract the 3-D scene information from single images, to allow for seamless object insertion, removal, and relocation. The process involves three phases: luminaire inference, perspective estimation (depth, occlusion, camera parameters), and texture replacement. The team, in their paper, says their method can realistically insert synthetic objects into existing photographs without requiring access to the scene or any additional scene measurements. “With a single image and a small amount of annotation, our method creates a physical model of the scene that is suitable for realistically rendering synthetic objects with diffuse, specular, and even glowing materials while accounting for lighting interactions between the objects and the scene.”Potentially useful applications include interior design, where decorators might take a photo of a room and experiment with different furniture and object insertions. Other possibilities include entertainment and gaming. © 2011 PhysOrg.com Explore further Image credit: Kevin Karsch More information: kevinkarsch.com/publications/sa11.html Citation: UIUC team will show can’t-tell photo inserts at Siggraph (w/ video) (2011, December 8) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2011-12-uiuc-team-cant-tell-photo-inserts.html New method to help computer vision systems decipher outdoor sceneslast_img read more

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Nanoporous graphene could outperform best commercial water desalination techniques

first_img Journal information: Nano Letters “Because those carbon atoms at the pore edge would be quite reactive without passivation, in one way or another under realistic experimental conditions they will likely have some form of chemical functionalization,” Grossman said. “This can be controlled to some extent, so we wanted to explore the two limits of hydrophobic vs. hydrophilic edge chemistries. If we had no functional groups (just bare carbon) then within a short time water molecules would dissociate at the pore edge and likely either hydrogenate or hydroxylate those carbons.” The scientists, David Cohen-Tanugi and Jeffrey C. Grossman of MIT, have published their study on water desalination using single-layer nanoporous graphene in a recent issue of Nano Letters.“This work shows that some of the drawbacks of current desalination techniques could be avoided by inventing more efficient and targeted membrane materials,” Grossman told Phys.org. “In particular, tailored nanostructuring of membranes could allow for actual flow of water (with full salt rejection) via size exclusion, leading to much higher permeability compared to reverse osmosis.”This is not the first time that researchers have investigated the use of nanoporous materials for desalination. In contrast to RO, which uses high pressure to slowly push water molecules (but not salt ions) through a porous membrane, nanoporous materials work under lower pressures and provide well-defined channels that can filter salt water at a faster rate than RO membranes. Explore further (Top left) Hydrogenated and (top right) hydroxylated graphene pores. (Bottom) Side view of the simulated nanoporous graphene filtering salt ions and producing potable water. Image credit: Cohen-Tanugi and Grossman. ©2012 American Chemical Society From seawater to freshwater with a nanotechnology filter The scientists compared the two chemistries, along with different pore sizes, of nanoporous graphene in their simulations by running saltwater with a salinity of 72 g/L over the membranes, which is about twice the salinity of average seawater (about 35 g/L). They found that, although the largest nanopores could filter water at the highest rate, large nanopores allowed some salt ions to pass through. The simulations identified an intermediate range of nanopore diameters where the nanopores were large enough to allow the passage of water molecules but small enough to restrict salt ions. The simulations also showed that the hydroxylated graphene significantly enhances the water permeability, which the scientists attribute to the hydrophilic nature of the hydroxyl groups. Since, in contrast, the hydrogenated pores are hydrophobic, water molecules can flow through only when in a limited number of highly ordered configurations. But hydrophilic groups allow water molecules to have a greater number of hydrogen-bonding configurations inside the pores, and this lack of restrictions increases the water flux.Overall, the results show that nanoporous graphene can theoretically outperform RO membranes in terms of water permeability, which is expressed in liters of output per square centimeter of membrane per day and per unit of applied pressure. Whereas high-flux RO has a water permeability of a few tenths, the simulations showed that nanoporous graphene’s water permeability ranged from 39 to 66 for pore configurations that exhibited full salt rejection (23.1 Å2 hydrogenated pores and 16.3 Å2 hydroxylated pores). Graphene with the largest hydroxylated pores reached 129, but allowed some passage of salt ions. Copyright 2012 Phys.org All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed in whole or part without the express written permission of PhysOrg.com. The scientists explain that there are two main challenges facing the use of nanoporous graphene for desalination purposes. One is achieving a narrow pore size distribution, although rapid experimental progress in synthesizing highly ordered porous graphene suggests that this may soon be feasible. The other challenge is mechanical stability under applied pressure, which could be achieved using a thin-film support layer such as that used in RO materials. “Computationally, we’re looking at a range of other potentially new ways to engineer membranes for desalination and decontamination,” Grossman said. “Experimentally, we are currently fabricating nanoporous membranes and hope to test their desalination performance in the coming months.”center_img More information: David Cohen-Tanugi and Jeffrey C. Grossman. “Water Desalination across Nanoporous Graphene.” Nano Letters. DOI: 10.1021/nl3012853 (Phys.org) — Although oceans and seas contain about 97% of Earth’s water, currently only a fraction of a percent of the world’s potable water supply comes from desalinated salt water. In order to increase our use of salt water, desalination techniques must become more energy-efficient and less expensive to be sustainable. In a new study, two materials scientists from MIT have shown in simulations that nanoporous graphene can filter salt from water at a rate that is 2-3 orders of magnitude faster than today’s best commercial desalination technology, reverse osmosis (RO). The researchers predict that graphene’s superior water permeability could lead to desalination techniques that require less energy and use smaller modules than RO technology, at a cost that will depend on future improvements in graphene fabrication methods. Water permeability of various desalination techniques. The graphene nanopores can reject salt ions with a water permeability 2-3 orders of magnitude higher than commercial reverse osmosis (RO) techniques. Image credit: Cohen-Tanugi and Grossman. ©2012 American Chemical Society However, this is the first time that scientists have explored the potential role of nanoporous graphene as a filter for water desalination. Single-layer graphene, which is just one carbon atom thick, is the ultimate thin membrane, making it advantageous for water desalination since water flux across a membrane scales inversely with the membrane’s thickness. Using classical molecular dynamics simulations, Cohen-Tanugi and Grossman examined the water permeability of nanoporous graphene with different pore diameters (1.5 to 62 Å2) and pore chemistry. As previous experiments have demonstrated, nanopores can be introduced in graphene by a variety of methods, including helium ion beam drilling and chemical etching. In their simulations, the scientists strengthened the nanopores by passivating, or shielding, each carbon atom at the pore edge with either hydrogen atoms or hydroxyl groups. Citation: Nanoporous graphene could outperform best commercial water desalination techniques (2012, June 22) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2012-06-nanoporous-graphene-outperform-commercial-desalination.html When water molecules (red and white) and sodium and chlorine ions (green and purple) in saltwater, on the right, encounter a sheet of graphene (pale blue, center) perforated by holes of the right size, the water passes through (left side), but the sodium and chlorine of the salt are blocked. Graphic: David Cohen-Tanugi This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only.last_img read more

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Israeli inventor has backers for cardboard bicycle

first_img(Phys.org)—Don’t tell Izhar Gafni that a bicycle can’t be made of cardboard. An Israeli engineer working in industrial design, he was always fascinated by the potential that comes from the interplay of technologies applied to materials. Gafni was too curious about turning materials into new uses and he could not take no for an answer. What’s more, bicycles, he said, went beyond “hobby.” With him, it was “in my soul.” That might explain his three years of efforts in coming up with a fully functioning bicycle made of cardboard, which has been accorded ample research and development to reach final stages and readiness to show the world. Gafni has secured backing for his project by partnering with ERB, which is managing business and financial aspects of the project.ERB said that it is raising funds to reach the point where they can have a detailed manufacturing plan under way for the first two platforms, a commercial, urban bike and a kids/youth bike. According to ERB, “These models will be made of almost 100 percent recycled materials and will have the option of adding an electric motor. At this stage we have only the prototype for the commercial bikes as shown on the video.” He consulted several engineers. They told him it was impossible. For an inventor, “impossible” is often a green light. “At the time, I just knew cardboard was a material for making packages but I explored it further,” he said.Basically, he said, his method was like that in Japanese origami, as he demonstrated how cardboard can be cut and folded for strength. He said his very first prototype looked like something between a box and a bicycle. He knew he had real work ahead. Gafni worked for several years in his tool shed to make a suitable model. He studied how he was going to structure the frame, seat and other parts, prototyping and tweaking, planning, sketching, running plans through computer programs. He did not use any metal parts. Once the desired shape was formed and cut, he treated the device with what is generally described as “organic materials.” The treatment he used made the cycle waterproof and fireproof. He coated the cardboard with lacquer paint. The tires were made from recycled rubber. The estimated cost to make such bicycles would be between nine and twelve dollars. The obvious benefit would be usefulness as an affordable means of transport. Not only is the design now in its final prototype stage but plans are under way for production. Citation: Israeli inventor has backers for cardboard bicycle (2012, October 17) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2012-10-israeli-inventor-backers-cardboard-bicycle.html Gafni says it all started the day he went to a bicycle shop to purchase parts and he overheard a customer talking about his building a canoe made of cardboard. “The idea stuck in my mind,” he said. “Why not build a bicycle made out of cardboard.” © 2012 Phys.orgcenter_img Explore further College student invents cardboard vacuum cleaner This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only. More information: www.erb.co.il/en/last_img read more

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Acoustic lens generates tunable sound bullets for ultrasound applications

first_img(a) Illustration of a sound bullet, where the surfaces are contours of constant pressure. The positive (red) and negative (blue) regions of the sound bullet are compact in 3D. (b) Experimental set-up of the acoustic lens, which is composed of 13 chains arranged in a square lattice. The hydrophone is used to measure sound under water. (c) Cross section of one of the chains and its casing. Credit: Donahue, et al. ©2014 AIP Publishing LLC Sound bullets in water An acoustic lens that could generate sound bullets was first demonstrated in 2009 by Professor Chiara Daraio and postdoctoral researcher Alessandro Spadoni at the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena, California. In that study, the researchers developed a 1D array of stainless steel spheres that struck each other similar to the way in which the metal balls in a Newton’s Cradle toy strike each other. An impact at one end of the chain of spheres generates solitary waves whose speed and focal points can be controlled by controlling the properties of the device.Now in a recent paper published in Applied Physics Letters, Daraio and a new team of researchers have expanded this 1D acoustic lens into a 2D version consisting of 13 vertical chains of 30 stainless steel spheres arranged in a square lattice. In addition, they experimentally demonstrated the ability to create sound bullets in water, which moves the technology a step closer to biomedical and naval applications. A 2D acoustic lens has two main advantages over the 1D version: the ability to control the focus in three dimensions and the potential for larger pressure gains due to the more compact arrangement.”This work was started to move a step closer to applications,” Daraio told Phys.org. “A 2D array of ‘acoustic sources’ (i.e., chains of particles) allow us to focus the ‘sound bullets’ in 3D, creating a more compact and controllable acoustic signal. This focused pressure field can then be moved (or even scanned) in a 3D volume. This is a very desirable feature in acoustic imaging and surgery, for example. Most importantly, we demonstrated the ability to produce sound bullets in water, which was something we had predicted earlier with numerical simulations, but that was never validated experimentally. Given that most acoustic imaging methods are used in a water setting (think sonars, or ultrasonic images of the human body), this is a big step forward towards a practical implementation.”The 2D acoustic lens functions similarly to the 1D version. In each chain, the 30 spheres are held in place within a hollow tube. Above the vertical chains are other elements, including compression screws and springs at the top, weights underneath them, followed by pulsers and piezoactuators that are just above the chains of spheres. The pulsers emit rapid, high-voltage pulses that exert downward pressure on the top stainless steel sphere, resulting in a solitary wave that propagates through the chain. The researchers calculated that the waves attain speeds of up to 643 m/s.The researchers showed how, by changing the placement of the chains and the wavelength of the solitary waves, they could control the shape and size of the sound bullets. The focal point of the sound bullets could be controlled in three dimensions by changing the pre-compression applied to the individual chains, or by triggering signals in each chain with a slight time delay. Controlling these properties of the sound bullets is essential for applications, such as for high-intensity forced ultrasound for therapeutic applications in which unhealthy tissue is targeted, while damage to healthy tissue is prevented.”The next step we would like to achieve is the ability to ‘image’ objects under water using sound bullets,” Daraio said. “This will require smaller improvements on the experimental setup and a bit more work on the data acquisition/image reconstruction analysis. We are also working on miniaturizing the systems, in order to obtain higher focal resolution, while maintaining a good signal amplitude (which is expected to improve the signal-to-noise ratio in imaging applications, for example). Finally, we are testing the acoustic lenses in solid materials (for example, composite plates used for aeronautical applications) to use the sound bullets to detect defects and analyze the properties of adjacent materials.” © 2014 Phys.org. All rights reserved. More information: Carly M. Donahue, et al. “Experimental realization of a nonlinear acoustic lens with a tunable focus.” Applied Physics Letters 104, 014103 (2014). DOI: 10.1063/1.4857635 Explore furthercenter_img This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only. Citation: Acoustic lens generates tunable ‘sound bullets’ for ultrasound applications (2014, January 17) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2014-01-acoustic-lens-tunable-bullets-ultrasound.html (Phys.org) —Scientists have developed an acoustic lens that produces pressure pulses that are so intense they’re called “sound bullets.” Although they are too high-pitched to be audible to the human ear, the sound bullets could have a variety of uses such as in medical ultrasound, underwater mapping, and other high-intensity acoustic applications. Journal information: Applied Physics Letterslast_img read more

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Measurements induce a phase transition in entangled systems

first_img Citation: Measurements induce a phase transition in entangled systems (2019, August 1) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2019-07-phase-transition-entangled.html More information: Brian Skinner, Jonathan Ruhman, and Adam Nahum. “Measurement-Induced Phase Transitions in the Dynamics of Entanglement.” Physical Review X. DOI: 10.1103/PhysRevX.9.031009 In the minimal cut problem, the goal is to cut a path through a network by breaking the fewest bonds (here, only the red bond needs to be broken). The problem is identical for an electric circuit (left) and a lattice (right) representing an entangled quantum system. Credit: Skinner, et al. ©2019 American Physical Society The researchers developed a model of this measurement-induced phase transition based on a famous problem from percolation theory called the “vandalized resistor grid.” In this problem, a vandal tries to find the smallest number of bonds (call the “shortest path” or “minimal cut”) to slice through an electric grid in order to completely disconnect the network. The researchers showed that the problem of calculating the entropy of entanglement in a quantum system is equivalent to this optimization problem, in which the goal is to find a minimal cut through a disordered network that separates the network into two parts. In an entangled system, the network represents the quantum system, and each measurement represents breaking one of the bonds. The degree of entanglement in the system is determined by the size of the minimal cut in this network, i.e., the total number of unbroken bonds that must be broken in order to separate the system from the rest of the network. In a sense, this number tells how frequently measurements can be made before an entangled system transitions into the disentangled phase. As different networks have different numbers and arrangements of bonds, the critical measurement rate differs for different systems. The physicists expect that an understanding of this measurement-induced phase transition in entanglement dynamics may have useful implications for developing simulations of quantum systems. Entanglement plays an important role in determining the difficulty of simulating quantum dynamics on a classical computer. As a result, the entangled-to-disentangled phase transition implies the existence of an easy-to-hard transition for simulations. This may allow researchers to better predict the difficulty of simulations and look for easier alternatives.”Our finding has an immediate implication for the question of how hard it is to simulate quantum systems using classical computers,” Skinner said. “It may also be important for quantum computing schemes, which often rely on maintaining long-range entanglement.”In the future, the researchers plan to investigate how universal their model is.”There are different ways of describing quantum entanglement mathematically,” Skinner said. “What we showed was that one of these descriptions is perfectly analogous to a classical percolation problem. But right now it’s unclear how generic this analogy is, and whether other ways of describing entanglement belong to the same ‘universality class.’ The first priority right now is to establish whether the analogy is only an approximate one that works in some contrived situations, or whether it is completely generic across a wide range of descriptions and experimental setups.”See Dr. Skinner’s Twitter posts on the paper. Explore further Many famous experiments have shown that the simple act of observing a quantum system can change the properties of the system. This phenomenon, called the “observer effect,” appears, for example, when Schrödinger’s cat becomes either dead or alive (but no longer both) after someone peeks into its box. The observation destroys the superposition of the cat’s state, or in other words, collapses the wave function that describes the probabilities of the cat being in each of the two states. © 2019 Science X Network Journal information: Physical Review X In a new paper, physicists have further investigated exactly how measurements affect quantum entanglement, which in this context is equivalent to the extent to which a system is in a superposition. Previous studies have shown that, when a quantum system is left alone to evolve without any outside interference, its degree of entanglement tends to increase. That is, quantum systems tend to drift over time into states with a large degree of quantum superposition. On the other hand, making a measurement on an entangled state tends to decrease its entanglement. This happens because a measurement on a spin state (for example) collapses that spin into a definite state, which causes that spin to become disentangled from the other spins, whose states remain in a superposition. This reduces the amount of entanglement in the system overall.In the new paper, the physicists have demonstrated via computer simulations and theoretical arguments that, when measurements are made at a rate that exceeds a critical value, a measurement-induced phase transition occurs. This causes the system to sharply transition from an “entangling” phase, in which the amount of entanglement grows continuously over time, to a “disentangling” phase, in which some entanglement still exists, but its growth rate drops to zero.The physicists, Brian Skinner at MIT, Jonathan Ruhman at MIT and Bar-Ilan University, and Adam Nahum at Oxford University, have published their paper on the phase transition for entanglement in a recent issue of Physical Review X.”One of the great successes of physics is its ability to describe phase transitions—the abrupt change of material properties when some external parameter is varied, like water suddenly freezing into ice when it drops below 32 degrees Fahrenheit,” Skinner told Phys.org. “What we have shown is that this same language can be applied to a dynamical process involving quantum entanglement. That is, the dynamical properties of entanglement growth also have a phase transition as a function of an external parameter, which is the rate at which measurements occur. For us, this is a beautiful and surprising connection!” This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only. Physicists develop new method to prove quantum entanglementlast_img read more

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Sporting pink for a cause

Pink might not be the new black, but it surely is the colour of the season. October is internationally the breast cancer awareness month and Delhi is living it up to inform about this one disease that can be fully cured if detected early. Hand in hand with Hard Rock Cafe, Ogaan foundation the breast cancer awareness foundation organised a documentary followed by a candid discussion to clear all doubts about the disease. The documentary featured women who had fought breast cancer and lived to talk about it. Doctors present at the event also spoke up to dispell the great cancer myth. While breast cancer has no specific risk, some facets can be kept in mind. Chances are high if she might be susceptible to the risk if she has a family history. The main precaution is not to ignore abnormalities if they arise and are detected, say doctors. read more

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Goas Capital calling

first_imgBharadwaj is an Indian entrepreneur, poet, artistic Director and Founder of Ferriswheel Entertainment Pvt. Ltd. Currently based in Mumbai. A pioneer in the field of arts, Bharadwaj has a comprehensive and impressive body of work that lists creative services in more than fifty countries ranging from mid-sized festivals to large scale events.Please tell us more about your contribution to the 28th edition of Surajkund MelaAns: Goa is the theme state at the Surajkund Mela this year. I am working as a  consultant to the government of Goa and Ministry of Tourism, Goa for this event.  The creatives and operations are being handled by my company Ferriswheel Entertainment Pvt Ltd. I decided that unlike the previous theme states, instead of just showcasing the state’s tradition, we should also bring out the festive and fun side of Goa. Witness both the traditional and modern and colourful side of Goa this year at the Surajkund Mela.  Also Read – ‘Playing Jojo was emotionally exhausting’What are the highlights of this year’s Surajkund Mela?Ans: The major attraction this year at the Surajkund Mela is the Goan carnival that is being run through the Mela every day. Led by King Momo on a massive float covered with LED lights, the carnival parade brings to you the real Goan essence. It is basically a celebration of life and depicts the fun and frolic of four days of festivities. As a jolly monarch, King Momo orders his subjects to sing, dance and make merry for four days. The carnival was brought to Goan shores by the erstwhile Portuguese rulers. Since then Goans have appropriated it and made it very different from the other leading carnivals of the world – namely Rio de Janeiro and Venice. Tourists from all over India and the world flock to Goa to be a part of this unique cross-cultural phenomenon. Also Read – Leslie doing new comedy special with Netflix300 artists from such a small state have come to Surajkundmela to showcase their talent. Apart from handicrafts and artifacts, we also have customized dance performances which have been specially choreographed to give you a taste of the culture and tradition of Goa. You can’t miss the Goan cuisine at the food stalls. From all kinds of sea-food to traditional Goan sweets, all that’s mouth-watering is available at the stalls. The décor needs a special mention here. The whole place has been designed keeping in mind the Goan essence. A Goa pavilion has been constructed with a little beach and other elements to bring the sun and sand of Goa to Surajkund itself. And then there is Casa Goa or ‘Apna Ghar’ which is a life size replica of an actual Goan household. The house has been adorned with LED lights and real Goan vegetation. A Goan couple welcomes you into their household with a traditional Goan welcome. You can even sample local Goan food here. All the furniture, even the little knick-knacks in the ‘Apna Ghar’ have been brought straight from Goa. How do you see the future of performing arts in the country? Ans: The future of performing arts in the country is very bright. People slowly are getting a better understanding of this industry. We have a massive cost effective skilled workforce that is the backbone of the entertainment industry. People are seeing it as a viable career option now. There is maturity in the audience’s choice in terms of spending their money and free time. That shift is visible in the success of EDMs, the public outreach festivals, comedy stores, large-scale live public festivals. We are now also on an infrastructural upswing as far as venues are concerned. There are better quality stadiums and venues available. Even high quality technical equipment is available within the country now. There is a whole dynamic shift in the perception of the performing arts industry and for us to be a part of this shift is very exciting. Our aim would be to create an educated performing arts community that has multiple avenues to generate business and Ferriswheel being a key player in that large shift.Ferriswheel is committed to changing the game of the performing arts market of the country.What changes should the government bring in to promote artisans and artists both at national and international level? Ans: The big change should come in the layman grass root understanding of artisans’ rights and privileges, concessions and schemes. Normally grants get given away to people who network at senior levels. The government should work on making outreach programmes to make their schemes heard by performers. A certain strata of performers also suffer immensely from taxation. The entertainment industry should unite to get a policy shift from the government. As a business, even though we are bracketed under the service industry, our output is seen as something that cannot be a primary collateral to bankers. A lot of young entertainment businesses collapse due to lack of funding and financial support. The government will have to work as a triangle focusing on artists, financing and entertainment businesses that create platforms for employment. How big is the Indian art market?Ans: The Indian art market is unstructured and nascent and does not have a collaborative figure that can be put together. But with serious players like us uniting in the market, we should hopefully be able to change the scenario in the next few years.last_img read more

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Sticking along in a bad marriage is wrong

first_imgPublishers believe pretty faces sell more books. Which is why the author picture on the back cover is paid more attention to at times than the content of a book. Which is not to say Shruti Sharma’s debut novel Abyss to Abyss is not interesting between the covers. It’s a good-hearted story of a girl stuck in a bad marriage who still believes in the power of dreams. Millennium Post had a quick tête-à-tête with Sharma. Read on…This being your debut book, how much of you is in protagonist Ria? Most writers end up making their first book autobiographical. Also Read – ‘Playing Jojo was emotionally exhausting’ This book is a work of fiction. But I think there is a little bit of Ria in all of us. Her character is very real, she does stupid things, she has fears like any one of us, she cries, she gets excited,  she has her gloomy moments. At the same time she also embodies someone who has the courage to go  beyond the boundaries, yes she is scared but she challenges herself and dares to explore the unknown which I think is admirable and inspiring.  Ria goes through an arranged marriage and moves to US with a stranger. You live abroad. How prevalent is arranged marriage among NRIs today? Also Read – Leslie doing new comedy special with Netflix I think it’s very common for guys here to get married to girls from India. In general, it’s so common for professionals here to just fly to India for 15 days, meet girls and then just marry one of them.  I live in Silicon Valley and most Indian girls that I have met here were here because of  arranged marriage. Here is the sad part, not many are happily married. And even more sad? No one talks about it. They choose to live through it because they are scared. And I think a lot of  this is cultural. It’s embedded subconsciously that once you are married you got to make it work…which is twisted because people should not be together if they are not meant to be together. I am not saying that all the marriages that are arranged are bad, what I am saying is that not very often do the girls (in bad marriages) take a decision of saying ‘You know what I am not going to put up with this crap anymore.’ In this novel, Ria recognises that sticking along in a bad marriage is wrong. And in the end everything turns out just fine and that’s the message I wanted to  convey. That people in bad marriages should not think that it’s the end. Pursue your dreams what may be…The universe guides you.Every character in my book is telling a story and it has a deeper meaning.  Ria seems to be all good. Do you think you could have painted her a little more grey? I think she does a lot of ‘wrong’. She does her fair share of ‘stupid’ things. She kept thinking her husband Jay would change then she chased Tanishq in desperate hope to find love so she wasn’t all that good. I painted her naive, that’s a color too. What prompted you to write a book? I grew up seeing my mom who has authored many books and I always wanted to write one. The timing was just right, professionally I had met all my goals so I thought of pursuing my long time dream of writing a novel. Why an e-book? There are takers for ebooks in the West, in India it is trend yet to catch upPaperback is also available through Amazon , Author House website and Barnes & Noble. Right now my publisher told me that the distribution channels (US based) will be able to sell the books internationally as well. Link: http://amzn.to/1sRRfZ8 What next for you? Plot of the next book in mind?Next book? I have a story in my mind but it’s very embryonic, again it’s going to be the one that can leave some sort of a message in the hearts of those who read the book. Did you have a specific readership in mind when you started writing? Mostly everyone but I think girls, who have been or are going through a rough relationship/ marriage will be able to relate to it. I hope this story can inspire people.last_img read more

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