Saved by reader sponsors Borderlands Books now aims to buy a building

first_imgHe’s now eight days and $500,000 in – with another $300,000 pending.“The only reason I have the nerve to do something like asking people to lend me $1.9 million – a dude who runs a bookstore – is the way that the sponsorship program worked out.” he said. “I have no idea if this is going to work out, but it beats figuring we’ll be out of business in 2025, so I might as well take a stab at it.”Back in 2016, Beatts floated the idea of buying a building to secure a permanent future for the bookstore. “Unless something really astonishing and perhaps almost biblical happens in San Francisco, we will not be able to pay rent in San Francisco,” he told sponsors at the time.More recently, the idea became more concrete. He found a building. It is at 1373 Haight Street. Lenders weren’t terribly interested in loaning Beatts and his bookstore more than a million dollars, so he’s turned to readers. Already, some have stepped up with loan offers of $100,000 and more. Daunting as it may seem for a small business to crowdfund a real estate purchase in 21 days, this is by no means a do-or-die affair. If the deadline isn’t met, the purchase will fall through, but Beatts still has about three years left on the bookstore lease on Valencia Street and eight years on the cafe. 0% When Alan Beatts announced in early 2015 that he would close his science fiction, mystery, and horror bookstore Borderlands, his customers did something extraordinary: They refused to let it happen. At a meeting that packed the Borderlands Cafe next door to the bookstore, they mourned the loss – and then made suggestions ranging from the tame to the bizarre to save it. They didn’t want to lose this bookstore and the community it harbored. Instead they suggested, and immediately offered up the money for, a sponsorship program that would make up for the widening gap between revenue and costs of running the business.Emboldened by that experience, Beatts has decided to pursue another idea that seems slightly mad. He’s buying a building, and to finance it, he had 21 days to raise $1.9 million in loans from bookstore customers. Tags: books • bookstores • Borderlands Books Share this: FacebookTwitterRedditemail,0% “It’s either buy [a building] or shoehorn the bookstore into the cafe space,” he said.But the possibilities opened up by property ownership are inarguably tantalizing – not as a moneymaking scheme, but to bookworms of all stripes who simply want to see the medium of “ink on dead trees” as Beatts puts it, continue to be available in San Francisco. And the sponsorship numbers – some 900 the first year, around 630 last year, and 692 this year – are one indicator of how much customers value the place, not just for its wares. “I’m doing all of this because I want to run my bookstore,” Beatts said. “In bookselling, just like in writing, winning consists of being able to keep doing it, and not having to go do something else,” he said.In the short term, if the deal is sealed, Borderlands could also run out its lease on Valencia while renting the commercial space on Haight Street to someone testing their business model who is looking for a short term lease. Either way, the cafe next to the bookstore – a self-sufficient business – will remain open, since its lease doesn’t expire until 2025.In all, the prospect of buying a building was sweet enough to prompt a bookseller with 20 years of business under his belt, 16 of them on Valencia Street, to leave the Mission for Haight Street. The shifting nature of Valencia Street has not escaped him. “I think it’s in trouble,” Beatts said. “Valencia used to be a really nice mix of neighborhood serving businesses.”Still, it’s not easy to leave the Mission.“It’s been wonderful to be here, and I hope we do get to move to Haight and it gets to be wonderful there too,” Beatts said. last_img read more

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Life as it is beloved Mission District photographer dies at 71

first_imgIn one of Ted Pushinsky’s photos, three boys stand at the 24th Street BART plaza. Two of them wear Stetson hats, one of them dances, and all three wear baggy slacks and shined-up shoes. Two of them read a sheet of paper whose words remain hidden from view.While it is only a black-and-white photograph — one taken in the ’80s, when the McDonald’s roof was still gabled and the newsstands still provided news — it’s not hard to hear the bustling sounds of the intersection or feel a slight breeze cut through what seems like a lazy Sunday afternoon.More than anything, it’s easy to imagine yourself being Pushinsky, the fly-on-the-wall street photographer who died of prostate cancer two weeks ago at the age of 71, and who most say lived and breathed through his camera lens.He was also known for his documenting — particularly 30 years of change in the Mission District. “I’m mad for the Mission,” he said in an interview with El Tecolote just weeks before he died. “It’s the place for me.” Pushinsky grew up in Queens, New York, until the age of 10, when his family moved to Pennsylvania. His father’s hobby was painting, so art was a part of the family atmosphere, Pushinsky’s brother, Jon, recalled.Pushinsky went to Penn State University, studied abroad in Mexico, and, after graduating in the early ’70s, moved to San Francisco.Most who knew Pushinsky or his work said that his photos come to life because of his unique gift of becoming invisible.“He left a legacy of being able to see and experience and feel what he was doing through his photographs,” said René Yañez, co-founder of Galería de la Raza.Yañez met Pushinsky in the 1980s at The Farm, an artistic community center and punk rock venue formerly located at the corner of Cesar Chavez and Potrero. “His wife was a dancer,” Yañez recalled, “and she would do a political act” with the iconic 1970s dance collective Tumbleweed. “I met him through his wife,” Yañez said.Later on, they ran into each other at the Bayview Boat Club. “He was always taking photographs,” Yañez said. “He was a quiet guy — but with a lot of talent and vision.”Amanda Lopez, a Los Angeles–based photographer, said Pushinsky inspired her own photography. They met at Hamburger Eyes, a photographers’ hub in Lilac Alley, near 24th and Mission, that has since closed.“There was a group of core crew members. Ted was one those,” she said. “When I think of Hamburger Eyes, I think of his work.”Lopez said that seeing Pushinsky’s work was especially important to her as a member of the Latino community.“As a Latina, there’s not really a lot of representation of myself” in artwork, she said. “Seeing Ted’s work and recognizing myself in some of it — it’s a powerful thing for someone to see this.”Courtesy of Tedpushinsky.com.“What especially spoke to me were the photos of the Mission, the kids and people coming up in the neighborhood,” she said.Ray Potes, a co-founder of Hamburger Eyes, said he frequently hung out with Pushinsky — at the studio and around the city. They would talk about photography and sports, Potes recalled, and would often go to lunch.“At any given time, you could run into him — he was a man about town,” Potes said. “We never had to call each other for anything. I would just run into him.”Potes said Pushinsky played a huge role in building up the Hamburger Eyes magazine when it first began in 2003. He remembers Pushinsky ringing his doorbell one day at his apartment on 24th Street. It was their first meeting.“I don’t even know how he got the address, and he said, ‘I want to give you guys photos for Hamburger Eyes,’” Potes said.“His work fit right into what we were trying to do,” he said.During the 1980s, Pushinsky was among the first to hang his work at the now-closed Eye Gallery in the Mission, recalled Tom Ferentz, who owns Sixth Street Photography Workshop and once co-ran Eye Gallery.“He brought in his work when we were having our first actual show,” Ferentz said. Pushinsky was a fan of jazz music, he added, and they had run into each other at jazz clubs several times. “That makes sense because of the improvisational quality of street photography,” Ferentz said.“That kind of photography was a practice, and he really practiced it,” Ferentz continued. “He was trying to capture life as it is.”Sometime in the early 1970s, photographer Henry Wessel remembers, he and Pushinsky were standing on a street corner in the Mission, waiting for the light to change.Suddenly, Pushinsky broke away and approached two men who were having a heated conversation. Standing five feet away from them, Pushinsky took out a pencil and pad and started writing.The two men eventually moved on, and when Pushinsky came back, Wessel asked what he was doing. Pushinsky said he was gathering dialogue for screenplays he often worked on.“I realize now that Ted was after authenticity,” Wessel said. “This turned out to be the power and driving force of all his photographs. When you look at Ted’s books, you believe the things he described existed in our physical world.”“Not an easy thing to accomplish.”A tribute to Pushinsky’s work runs through Feb. 24 at Acción Latina. A memorial reception will take place on Saturday, February 24th from 3-6pm at the Juan R. Fuentes Gallery at Accion Latina (2958 24th Street). This will be a free event open to the public. Visitors are encouraged to contribute anything they would like to a community altar the gallery currently has on display within his exhibition.  Tags: arts • Photography • street photography Share this: FacebookTwitterRedditemail,0%center_img 0%last_img read more

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PORTICO Vine have been shortlisted for DIY makeove

first_imgPORTICO Vine have been shortlisted for DIY makeover in National competition from talkSPORT and WickesThey are up against clubs from Kent and London who play football and cricket so respectively.Let’s ALL get behind ARLFC Portico Vine Panthers representing the North of England and the great sport of rugby league!Voting closes will close at 23:59 on Sunday May 10.Please vote for Portico Vine (Panthers) ARLFC here.last_img

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In the modern era Saints have won 34 of the 46 co

first_imgIn the modern era, Saints have won 34 of the 46 contests between the two sides but have fared indifferently on the road.Since 2011, they have only secured two Super League wins at the John Smith’s Stadium.Super League Summary:Huddersfield won 11 St Helens won 34 (includes wins in 2009 and 2010 play-offs) 1 drawHighs and Lows:Huddersfield highest score: 48-20 (MW, 2016) (Widest margin: 40-4, A, 2013) St Helens highest score: 68-18 (H, 1998) (Widest margin: 68-18, H, 1998; 54-4, H, 2007)Milestones:Luke Thompson is set to make his 100th career appearance this Friday. He has played 98 times for Saints since 2013 and once for Rochdale on dual-registration.Alex Walmsley needs one appearance to reach 150 for St Helens. He made his Saints debut as a substitute in a 22-22 home draw with Hull FC on February 15, 2013.Tommy Makinson needs three tries to reach a century of touchdowns for St Helens. He has scored 97 tries in 169 games for the Saints since 2011.James Roby needs three tries to reach a century of touchdowns for St Helens. He has scored 97 tries in 401 games for the Saints since 2004.Jonny Lomax is one game away from 150 Super League appearances.Betfred Super League Leading Scorers:Tries: 1 = Fetuli Talanoa (Hull FC), Liam Marshall (Wigan Warriors) 4 3 = David Mead (Catalans Dragons), Jimmy Keinhorst (Leeds Rhinos), Mark Percival (St Helens), Tom Johnstone (Wakefield Trinity), Krisnan Inu (Widnes Vikings) 3Goals: 1 Danny Richardson (St Helens) 11 2 Sam Tomkins (Wigan Warriors) 10 3 Tom Gilmore (Widnes Vikings) 9 4 Marc Sneyd (Hull FC) 8 5 = Danny Brough (Huddersfield Giants), Bryson Goodwin (Warrington Wolves) 6Points: 1 Danny Richardson (St Helens) 23 2 Sam Tomkins (Wigan Warriors) 20 3 = Tom Gilmore (Widnes Vikings), Ryan Shaw (Hull Kingston Rovers) 18 5 = Bryson Goodwin (Warrington Wolves), Liam Marshall (Wigan Warriors), Marc Sneyd (Hull FC), Fetuli Talanoa (Hull FC) 16last_img read more

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Shots fired at Columbus County home with children inside

first_img The three women, two men, and the 7-year-old boy, 10-year-old girl, and 13-year-old girl were not hurt.The Sheriff’s Office says a home and a vehicle on the property were damaged during the shooting.A Columbus County Sheriff’s Deputy attempted to stop a suspicious vehicle in reference to the shooting. The vehicle did not stop when the deputy turned on his lights and siren.Related Article: Sheriff: 5-year-old North Carolina boy killed by crossfireThe vehicle sped off and the deputy lost track of it.The shooting is still under investigation. COLUMBUS COUNTY, NC (WWAY) — Five adults and three children were inside a home in Bolton when they heard an explosion and then several gunshots, according to the Columbus County Sheriff’s Office.It happened at 11:15 p.m. on Wednesday on 8th Street.- Advertisement – last_img read more

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Man convicted of trafficking heroin into Wilmington

first_imgMusa Halley (Photo: NHSO) WILMINGTON, NC (WWAY) — A New Jersey man pleaded guilty to trafficking drugs into the Cape Fear.Musa Halley, 31, was charged with trafficking heroin, conspiracy to traffic heroin, and felony flee to elude arrest.- Advertisement – Judge L. Lamont Wiggins sentenced Halley Monday to at least seven and half years in prison and to pay a $100,000 fine.On the morning of October 31, 2016, Halley picked up Courtney Allen in the parking lot of the Wal-Mart on Sigmon Road. Allen had just arrived in Wilmington on a bus from Newark, New Jersey and was seen carrying a suspicious bag.When Vice and Narcotics Detectives from the Wilmington Police Department attempted to pull over Halley and Allen to investigate, Halley drove away and lead officers on a lengthy chase through midtown Wilmington. Allen and Halley were finally arrested at the corner of Independence Boulevard and Wrightsville Avenue, but the suspicious bag Allen was seen with was not found inside of the vehicle. Officers say they later found that the bag had been thrown out of their vehicle at the 200 block of Henry Street.Related Article: Suspect in Trooper Conner’s murder charged in unrelated murderInside the bag, officers found 7,886 bindles of heroin. Allen later admitted to law enforcement that she brought the bag down at Halley’s request.Halley has several prior convictions for drug distribution in New Jersey.last_img read more

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US House approves 17 billion in disaster aid for Carolinas

first_imgWASHINGTON (AP) — The House on Wednesday overwhelmingly passed legislation that would provide $1.7 billion to help residents of the Carolinas and elsewhere recover from recent natural disasters.The aid was added to legislation to keep Federal Aviation Administration programs running beyond month’s end. The bill passed 398-23.- Advertisement – Lawmakers describe the disaster aid as a down payment. They say billions more will be needed in the months ahead to help communities devastated by Hurricane Florence.Lawmakers are working to extend the FAA’s programs for five years while tackling other priorities such as disaster relief. Lawmakers sought to address several concerns of the flying public in the bill. For example, it requires the FAA to set minimum requirements for seat width and legroom on airplanes to ensure that passengers could evacuate a plane quickly in an emergency. Lawmakers were also responding to complaints about cramped seating with the directive.“Safety should not take a back seat, especially a shrunken seat, to airline profits,” said Rep. Steve Cohen, D-Tenn., who sponsored the seat legislation.Related Article: Pregnant? Here’s what NHRMC recommendsAnother provision would prohibit the involuntary bumping of passengers who have already boarded a plane, a response to the public outrage over a passenger who was dragged off a United Express flight last year when he refused to leave.Lawmakers declined to include in the final bill a provision from Sen. Ed Markey, D-Mass., to ensure that fees airlines increasingly charge passengers are “reasonable and proportional to the costs of the services provided.”Airlines raised about $7.4 billion in fees last year, mostly through baggage fees and fees for changing their flight.Markey said the consolidation among major airlines has reduced competition, and that has allowed the airlines to increasingly rely on fees to boost their profits without fear of losing customers.“We know that when choice goes down, fees go up. And these sky-high fees bear almost no resemblance to the cost of the services being provided,” Markey said.Lawmakers also added to the legislation a bill giving the FBI and Homeland Security officials the authority to track and down drones deemed a “credible threat” to people or federal facilities. That’s something Attorney General Jeff Sessions had sought. Sessions said drones promise to strengthen the U.S. economically but “can also be used to wreak havoc by criminals, terrorists and other bad actors.”Privacy advocates criticized the provision. Neema Singh Guliani, a lawyer for the American Civil Liberties Union, said it gives the government new power to spy on Americans without a warrant and to interfere with press freedom by restricting coverage using drones. The Electronic Frontier Foundation and a press-photographers group also oppose the measure.The Senate must also pass the bill before it can be signed into law by the president. Lawmakers are racing to address a range of issues before the end of the fiscal year. If the Senate doesn’t pass the bill before then, it will need to pass a short-term measure that would keep FAA programs going.The bill also makes changes to Federal Emergency Management Agency programs by putting more money into such things as rebuilding levees and building seawalls before hurricanes hit so that the damage won’t be as severe.“This will save lives, save money, and bend the cost curve of disasters,” said Rep. Bill Shuster, R-Pa., and chairman of the House Committee on Transportation and Infrastructure.Lawmakers from South Carolina and North Carolina had urged Speaker Paul Ryan and Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi to provide some quick relief for the states as officials assess the full scope of the damage that has occurred. At least 47 deaths have been attributed to the storm. The lawmakers described the damage in a letter to Ryan and Pelosi. They said entire communities have been isolated because of flooding that was worse than any previous natural disaster in those states.last_img read more

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Holland Shelter Creek Restaurant torn down Tuesday

first_img “When I drove by and saw that Holland’s was actually being torn down today, I had to stop,” said Cathy Claris. “It’s my favorite restaurant in the world.”Claris says it is heartbreaking to see a landmark going away.Owner Stephen Holland says the restaurant was always busy.Related Article: Man arrested following high-speed crash in Pender County“Most of my customers travel 30 to 100 miles to get here, and they come every week,” said Holland.Holland says flooding from Hurricane Florence moved the restaurant off its foundation but, he does not have flood insurance and cannot afford to rebuild.“We don’t qualify for low interest loans,” said Holland. “We qualify for the highest loans you can get, which is over 7.5 percent. You can’t build back after 7.5 percent.”Holland says he does not want to go, but he is now focused on restoring the power and plumbing to the campground next to the restaurant.He says there are many campers with nowhere to go who need a home.If you are looking to help, support the ‘Rebuild Holland’s Shelter Creek’ GoFundMe. BURGAW, NC (WWAY) –One day before his 71st birthday, a Pender County business owner says goodbye to his 37-year-old restaurant.Some in Pender County consider Holland’s Shelter Creek is an icon.- Advertisement – last_img read more

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Local food bank gets hearty donation

first_imgWILMINGTON, NC (WWAY)– Smithfield Foods and Food Lion made a hearty donation of fresh vegetables and meat to the Food Bank of Central and Eastern North Carolina, Friday morning.40,000 pounds of protein-rich meat and 9,000 pounds of produce were donated at the Wilmington branch.- Advertisement – Since the start of recovery, the food bank has delivered 3.6 million meals.  Branch Director Beth Gaglione says they will continue serving until recovery is over.“I stood with one of our partner agencies and tears came down her face, when she heard about all the help,” said Gaglione. “…and she knows we’ll be here will her for the long haul.”Gaglione says the donations will be split with the Greenville and Jacksonville branches. The food will be prepared and distributed in the next week.Related Article: Virginia man trucks over 2,000 lbs of fresh food to CarolinasIf you are interested in helping support affected families, visit the Food Bank of Central & Eastern North Carolina website.last_img read more

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Cape Fear Academy athletes on to the next level

first_imgWILMINGTON, NC (WWAY)– College athletic signings continued throughout the area this afternoon, as Cape Fear Academy had three student athletes sign their letters.It’s been a banner year athletically for the Cape Fear Academy Hurricanes and now three more student athletes are headed to the college ranks.- Advertisement – Henry Murtagh signed his national letter of intent to play mens lacrosse for Stevens Institute of Technology. “I knew when I started playing lacrosse that I dont know, I loved it. An freshman year when I saw Tony Bachuro play, he only had good things to say about it. I just knew this was something that I wanted to do,” said Murtagh.His teammate and classmate Preston Meehl will also play lacrosse at Rhodes College. “Its been big because my grandpa and my dad have been college athletes and its something I have wanted to do my whole life. So, this is a big moment for me,” said Mehhl.Ethan Miles will continue his soccer career at Virginia Military Institute. “Its a dream come true all the hard work finally pays off and now its the next step. Next chapter in my life. Hopefully I can do very well at VMI and keep the generation of D1 soccer,” said Miles.For the athletes that signed this afternoon it has been years in the making, and we wish them the best of luck.last_img read more

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