ABTA issues new plea for government support | News

first_imgIn response, ABTA has renewed its calls to government to deliver a plan which provides tailored support for the industry and put measures in place to ensure a swift return to travel and boost consumer confidence after the lockdown has lifted.It acknowledges that while positive developments this week, in terms of securing a vaccine, will go some way to restoring consumer confidence in booking future travel plans, travel businesses need help now. It highlights that while other sectors – like hospitality, culture and the arts – have received specific support from the Government, travel businesses have been left wanting. – Advertisement – New figures from ABTA suggest nine in ten holidays were either cancelled or rearranged in July and August, as the Covid-19 pandemic caused havoc in the travel sector.The new findings are from a survey of members carried out at the end of October before the latest lockdown measures were announced. – Advertisement – OlderCampbell Gray Hotels signs for new project in Cairo – Advertisement –center_img They also reveal that a third of businesses have not yet resumed active operations since the UK-wide national lockdown – demonstrating the constraints on the sector.The lack of an opportunity to recover means that in the current trading conditions businesses expect to end the year 93 per cent down on bookings compared to this time last year. Even before the latest lockdown, redundancies are estimated to have almost doubled over a three-month period – with 164,000 people either losing their jobs or having their jobs at risk in the travel and wider industries, up from 90,000 in August.- Advertisement – Mark Tanzer, chief executive of ABTA, said: “The travel industry has had no meaningful chance to recover – bookings have largely vanished, cancellations are common as destinations move on and off the travel corridor list and the government is yet to deliver a testing framework for industry and customers. “The results are stark for businesses – job losses mounting at an alarming rate and viable, longstanding businesses closing their doors for good.”He added: “But there is demand for travel and we are starting to see people booking for summer 2021 – demonstrating the importance of travel and resilience of the market. “This will no doubt be boosted by the news of a vaccine, but we must remember that a robust vaccine programme is many months away and the industry is struggling now.“It is short-sighted of the government to overlook the industry as travel is fundamental to our economic recovery.”last_img read more

Read Full Article

Novak Djokovic still does not know whether ATP Cup will take place in Australia in January | Tennis News

first_img Djokovic helped Serbia win the inaugural ATP Cup earlier this year Djokovic helped Serbia win the inaugural ATP Cup earlier this year

Read Full Article

WHO updates rules to prevent spread of disease

first_imgMay 24, 2005 (CIDRAP News) – Member countries of the World Health Organization (WHO) yesterday approved the first major revision of the WHO’s rules to prevent the international spread of diseases in decades.The new version of the International Health Regulations reflects lessons learned over the past 30 years and especially the world’s experience with SARS (severe acute respiratory syndrome) in 2003 and avian influenza in the past 2 years, the WHO said yesterday.”The new regulations bring disease control into the twenty-first century,” Dr Anarfi Asamoa-Baah, WHO assistant director-general in charge of communicable diseases, stated in a WHO news release. “With this framework, we can now support the work of countries in controlling outbreaks more effectively. The regulations provide WHO with new, clearly defined roles and responsibilities as we help countries to respond to disease outbreaks.”The new regulations, which take effect 2 years from now, were approved by the World Health Assembly yesterday in Geneva. The rules require member countries to have or develop specific capabilities to identify and respond to public health emergencies of international concern and to take routine preventive measures at ports, airports, and border stations.”Every country already has some of these capacities but almost no country has a perfect system,” said Dr Max Hardiman of WHO, who coordinated the revision of the regulations. “The new regulations set clear standards and will help countries to identify where their disease surveillance and response must improve.”The WHO originally adopted what were then called the International Sanitary Regulations in 1951; they were renamed in 1969 and modified in 1973 and 1981. The rules were originally designed to help monitor and control six serious infectious diseases: cholera, plague, yellow fever, smallpox, relapsing fever, and typhus.”The new rules will govern a broader range of public health emergencies of international concern, including emerging diseases,” the WHO said.The rules include a list of diseases that must be reported to the WHO, such as smallpox, polio, and SARS, along with guidelines to help countries decide whether other outbreaks or threats are of international concern. Under the existing regulations, only cholera, plague, and yellow fever must be reported to the WHO.The regulations also address the “natural occurrence, accidental release or deliberate use of biological and chemical agents or radionuclear material,” according to an Agence France-Presse (AFP) report published yesterday.WHO officials have said the revised rules largely reflect existing informal procedures that have been developed in recent years, the AFP report said.Dr Guenael Rodier, WHO director of communicable disease surveillance and response, commented in the news release, “The existing regulations were written for a very different world from the one we live in today. Air travel was a luxury and the movement of goods and people around the world was relatively slow. Today, travel and trade have expanded far beyond what was envisaged under the original regulations. The new rules respond to a globalized, 24-hour world in which a disease outbreak in one country can rapidly move around the world.”The revision of the regulations has taken several years and “an enormous amount of work” by all 192 member countries of the WHO, the agency said. The project was capped by several long sessions of a working group chaired by Ambassador Mary Whelan of Ireland.See also:May 23 WHO news releasehttp://www.who.int/mediacentre/news/releases/2005/pr_wha03/en/index.htmlWHO International Health Regulations pagehttp://www.who.int/csr/ihr/en/Full text of regulations (60 pages)https://apps.who.int/gb/ebwha/pdf_files/WHA58/A58_55-en.pdflast_img read more

Read Full Article

Canada reports 10th case of BSE

first_imgMay 4, 2007 (CIDRAP News) – Canada recently confirmed its tenth case of bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE), or mad cow disease—its second of 2007. The age of the animal falls within the age range of Canada’s previous BSE cases and is consistent with the known incubation period of the disease, the CFIA report noted. CFIA officials determined that the 66-month-old animal was born after a 1997 feed ban, imposed by Canada and the United States to prevent the spread of BSE from contaminated protein from cattle and other ruminants in cattle feed. The preliminary investigation suggests that the animal was probably exposed to a very small amount of infective material, most likely during its first year of life. The CFIA said it would launch an epidemiologic investigation to identify the animal’s herdmates at its time of birth and how it might have become infected. “It is not unexpected to find BSE-infected animals born after the feed ban. This has proven to be the case in most other countries with targeted surveillance, similar to that in Canada,” the CFIA report said. The case was found in a mature dairy cow from British Columbia, the Canadian Food Inspection Agency (CFIA) said in a May 2 statement. The disease was detected through Canada’s ongoing surveillance program. The cow’s carcass is under CFIA custody, and no part of it entered the human food or animal feed systems, the CFIA said. On Jul 12, an extension of Canada’s feed ban goes into effect. It bans potentially infective cattle parts (specified risk materials) to all animal feeds, not just feed for ruminants.last_img read more

Read Full Article

H5N1 hits second farm in UK

first_imgNov 19, 2007 (CIDRAP News) – A second turkey farm in the Suffolk-Norfolk area of England has been hit by the H5N1 avian influenza virus, though the flock there appeared healthy, British authorities announced today.A BBC News report identified the affected farm as Hill Meadow Farm, Knettishall, a few miles northwest of the farm where the virus was confirmed on Nov 13. The earlier outbreak site is near the town of Diss, about 107 miles northeast of London. Both farms are operated by the same company, the report said.The second outbreak site is one of four farms that the UK Department of Environment, Food and Rural Affairs (DEFRA) listed as “Dangerous Contact” premises last week. “On clinical inspection the flock appeared healthy which indicates the infection was in its early stages,” DEFRA said in a statement today.All the poultry at the four “Dangerous Contact” sites, totaling about 28,600 birds, had been culled as of yesterday, DEFRA said. Culling at the second outbreak site was completed Nov 17.Hill Meadow Farm lies outside a 3-kilometer protection zone that was set up around the first outbreak site, Redgrave Park Farm, but inside a wider restricted area that encompasses Suffolk and parts of Norfolk, the BBC story said.DEFRA said it was setting up a 3-kilometer protection zone around the new outbreak site and extending a surveillance zone established earlier.The BBC said DEFRA is still awaiting the results of lab tests on poultry at two other area farms where culling was carried out.Authorities have not yet reported the full results of an investigation into possible sources of the virus. Last week DEFRA officials said initial genetic sequence data indicated the strain was closely related to H5N1 viruses found recently in the Czech Republic and Germany.In the DEFRA statement, Acting Chief Veterinary Office Fred Landeg said, “The laboratory test results today highlight the importance of poultry keepers in the area being extremely vigilant. It is essential they practice the highest levels of biosecurity and report any suspicions of disease to their local Animal Health office.”The United Kingdom has had one previous H5N1 outbreak in poultry, at the Bernard Matthews turkey operation about 70 miles northeast of London in February. Authorities never firmly identified the source of the virus but said it probably came from turkey meat imported from Hungary.last_img read more

Read Full Article

UN: H5N1 responses improving, but threat persists

first_imgNov 30, 2007 (CIDRAP News) – Many countries have improved their responses to H5N1 avian influenza outbreaks in poultry in the past year, but the disease remains entrenched in six countries, according to a new report from the United Nations and the World Bank.Amid the persisting threat that the H5N1 virus will spark a human flu pandemic, governments need to do more to coordinate their pandemic planning efforts, according to a UN news release about the report. The report itself was not released online.”The pandemic threat has led most Governments to improve services to detect, contain and lessen the impact of dangerous pathogens,” the UN statement says. “Many national pandemic plans, however, are not sufficiently operational and the coordination of pandemic planning between countries needs greater attention.”Dr. David Nabarro, the UN’s senior influenza coordinator, commented in the statement, “The most urgent need, now, is for the Governments of different countries to work together. First, they must contain avian influenza and other animal diseases that might affect humans. Second, they must prepare for influenza and other possible pandemics.”The report was released in advance of a global conference on avian and pandemic flu, scheduled Dec 4 to 6 in New Delhi. The document comes a week after a World Health Organization (WHO) conference in Geneva made little headway toward solving a dispute over the international sharing of H5N1 virus samples and in the wake of poultry outbreaks in Romania, the United Kingdom, Saudi Arabia, Vietnam, Bangladesh, and Pakistan.The report says H5N1 avian flu has been reported in 60 countries since 2003, according to a Nov 29 Reuters story. The UN statement does not list the six countries in which the virus remains well established, but the Reuters story quotes the report as saying the virus “is currently entrenched in Indonesia, Egypt and Nigeria, and possibly in some locations in China and Bangladesh.”Nabarro said H5N1 is being “continuously transmitted” in at least half the districts of Indonesia, according to an Agence France-Presse (AFP) report .”Intensive control efforts—including vaccination of poultry—are being mounted in these settings [countries where the virus is entrenched] to get the disease under control and eliminate outbreaks when they occur,” the UN said. “Under present conditions, most other countries are able to control outbreaks when they occur in other settings.”Reuters quoted the report as saying, “Outbreaks are being detected more rapidly and the response is more effective. However, animal health services are still substandard in most countries—they lack necessary regulatory frameworks, budgets, laboratory capacity and implementation of biosecurity measures.”In regard to governmental responses to poultry outbreaks, the report largely echoes a UN Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO) statement issued in June. At that point the FAO said responses to H5N1 outbreaks had improved significantly in the preceding 3 years but that the virus remained entrenched in several countries and would continue to spread.The UN said nations that initially treated avian flu as an emergency are now developing “longer-term sustainable strategies for the healthy rearing and management of waterfowl, and investing in animal health, including better-run veterinary services.”The document also calls on countries to share H5N1 virus samples. Indonesia, the country hit hardest by avian flu, has shared very few samples over the past year, contending that the long-standing international system for flu surveillance is unfair because rich countries use virus samples from poor countries to develop vaccines that the poor countries can’t afford.A Nov 29 story from the UN News Service says the report calls for the urgent creation of a 3- to 5-year road map to drive intergovernmental action to control avian flu and improve global readiness for other health crises.The UN report is based on data provided by 143 countries, the UN said. Ninety-five percent of the countries said they are planning for a pandemic. Some of these have taken steps to ensure continuity of vital infrastructure in a pandemic, and some have tested their plans in simulation exercises.See also: Nov 29 UN press releasehttp://www.un.org/News/Press/docs//2007/sag417.doc.htmNov 29 story from UN News Servicehttp://www.un.org/apps/news/story.asp?NewsID=24848&Cr=avian&Cr1=fluJun 27 CIDRAP News story “FAO says avian flu entrenched as new outbreaks appear”last_img read more

Read Full Article

NEWS SCAN: Avian flu, Lassa fever in UK, farm workers and food contamination, meningitis in Nigeria, Salmonella update

first_imgFeb 20, 2009H5N1 outbreaks strike Nepal, LaosNepal’s agriculture ministry today reported another H5N1 outbreak in poultry, the second since mid January, Xinhua, China’s state news agency, reported today. The virus hit birds in Jhapa district in the eastern part of the country. Elsewhere, animal health officials in Laos recently reported H5N1 avian influenza outbreaks in five villages in Phongsaly province that prompted authorities to cull 903 chickens and 39 ducks to control the spread of the virus, the Vientiane Times reported yesterday.[Feb 20 Xinhua story]UK reports two Lassa fever cases, one fatalA patient died from Lassa fever in London on Feb 17 after becoming ill while working in Mali, the United Kingdom’s Health Protection Agency (HPA) said in a Feb 18 statement. The HPA said it was working with London’s University College Hospital to identify staff who helped care for the patient. The patient is UK’s second such case in as many months. On Jan 23, the HPA said a resident who returned home from Nigeria was diagnosed as having Lassa fever.[Feb 18 HPA statement][Jan 23 HPA statement]Minimizing farm workers’ role in food contaminationHealth officials should keep in mind the role of farm workers in disease transmission when addressing food safety issues, according to a report that will appear in the March issue of the Journal of Environmental Health. The author, Jennifer Ibrahim, PhD, from Temple University, wrote that produce companies can prevent the spread of foodborne disease by vaccinating all workers, enforcing occupational health and safety laws, and providing understandable information on sanitation.[Feb 20 Temple University press release]WHO reports meningitis outbreak in NigeriaThe World Health Organization (WHO) yesterday reported a meningococcal disease outbreak in Nigeria, where the health ministry has reported 1,364 suspected cases and 108 deaths in 19 of the country’s 35 states and Abuja. An international vaccine-coordinating group approved the release of 268,750 polysaccharide vaccine doses for mass vaccination campaigns in two affected areas in Jigawa state.[Feb 19 WHO statement]Salmonella cases and recall numbers riseThe number of people sickened in the nationwide peanut-related Salmonella outbreak rose to 654 cases in 44 states, the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) said yesterday. The most recent illness onset date was Feb 3. The Food and Drug Administration said the number of recalls related to the outbreak has risen to more than 2,500 products in 19 different categories.[CDC investigation update][FDA outbreak recall update]last_img read more

Read Full Article

An agreement has been reached, union representatives are giving up on the announced strike

first_imgNa sastanku koji je u četvrtak, 3. kolovoza održan u Ministarstvu mora, prometa i infrastrukture, a na kojem su uz ministra Olega Butkovića, sudjelovali predsjednik Uprave Croatia Airlinesa Krešimir Kučko te predstavnici sindikata Croatia Airlinesa, postignut je dogovor.Zaključeno je kako se najavljeni štrajk sindikata zaposlenika za 8. kolovoza neće održati, a pregovori o novom kolektivnom ugovoru nastavit će se 1. rujna 2017. godine.Podsjetimo, na sastanak koji je jučer najavljen, ministar mora, prometa i infrastrukture Oleg Butković pozvao je Upravu Croatia Airlinesa i predstavnike sindikata Croatia Airlinesa. Dio traženih zahtjeva Uprava Croatia Airlinesa je prihvatila, a o ostalim zahtjevima sindikata pregovori će se nastaviti u rujnu ove godine. U pregovore oko postizanja dogovora i sklapanja novog kolektivnog ugovora za zaposlenike Croatia Airlinesa uključit će se i Ministarstvo mora, prometa i infrastrukture s ciljem iznalaženja najboljeg rješenja, kako za prava i dobrobit radnika tako i kompanije te postizanja njene stabilnosti i održivosti.last_img read more

Read Full Article

HUP supports the Proposal of the Decision on determining the annual quota of permits for employment of foreigners

first_img&lt;br /&gt;<br />
&lt;a href=”https://bs.serving-sys.com/Serving/adServer.bs?cn=brd&amp;pli=1074171063&amp;Page=&amp;Pos=-1477388646″ target=”_blank”&gt;&lt;br /&gt;<br />
&lt;img src=”https://bs.serving-sys.com/Serving/adServer.bs?c=8&amp;cn=display&amp;pli=1074171063&amp;Page=&amp;Pos=-1477388646″ border=0 width=1280 height=200&gt;&lt;/a&gt;&lt;br /&gt;<br />
The Croatian Employers’ Association supports the Proposal of the decision on determining the annual quota of permits for employment of foreigners for the calendar year 2018. Adoption of the proposed decision will greatly facilitate employment in branches that are in high expansion such as construction and tourism, HUP points out.The proposed quota totals 29.000 work permits, of which 17.810 for new employment, 9000 for the extension of already issued permits and 1940 for seasonal employment permits (1.400 tourism and 540 agriculture). HUP points out that they are satisfied with the proposed quota and understanding for the issue of labor shortage expressed by the relevant Ministry, but they point out two key things that HUP has been warning about for several years.First, for a long-term solution to the problem, it is necessary to implement a comprehensive reform of education, which is key to restructuring the entire system that should monitor the needs of the economy and adjust educational programs accordingly, because only in this way labor shortages can be solved by hiring domestic workers. As this is not possible today, the future Croatian labor market, despite the fact of approximately 180.000 unemployed people is not able, given their structure to meet the needs of the economy and Croatian entrepreneurs are forced to turn to foreign workers to fulfill their contractual obligations. Secondly, in addition to the reform of education, a series of measures should be implemented that will enable the needs for labor force to be met in the coming years by employing domestic workers.The current quota system is not a permanent solution, it is a firefighting measure that tries to overcome the problem of lack of skilled labor, which is the result of many years of neglect of workers and the tourism profession, of course with lower fixed costs and increased earnings. Man is the key to success in tourism, but obviously not in Croatia.Related news:last_img read more

Read Full Article